Course Descriptions

courses are listed alphabetically by subject prefix

  

ACCOUNTING (ACT)

ACT 215

Principles of Financial Accounting I

3 credit hours

A conceptual study of the principles of financial accounting that emphasizes the balance sheet, income statement, and the basic bookkeeping system. Specifically includes deferrals and accruals, adjusting and closing entries, special journals, the voucher system, and payroll accounting.

 

ACT 216

Principles of Financial and Managerial Accounting II

3 credit hours

A continuation of financial accounting as it relates to partnerships and corporations, with some coverage of topics in the managerial accounting area, including manufacturing accounting, control accounting, CVP relationships, financial statement analysis, cash flow statements, and special management reports.

Prerequisite: ACT 215.

 

ACT 320

Quantitative Analysis

3 credit hours

A study of the quantitative analysis interpretations of data for business decision-making; probability theory, linear programming, special purpose algorithms, inventory models, PERT/CPM, forecasting, and other quantitative methods.

Prerequisites: MAT 232, ACT 215, and ACT 216.

 

ACT 327

Intermediate Accounting I

3 credit hours

A comprehensive study of intermediate accounting theory and technique. Emphasizes financial statement relationships with a balance sheet approach to the study. The course moves from the most current and liquid categories to the least current along balance-sheet lines covering all of the major balance sheet classifications and account groupings individually and in depth. The first in a two-course sequence, it covers roughly one-half of the comprehensive intermediate accounting volumes. (Cross listed with GACT 527.)

Prerequisite: ACT 216.

 

ACT 328

Intermediate Accounting II

3 credit hours

A continuation of the study of intermediate theory, which includes proper coverage of any official pronouncements of the FASB or other official bodies of the AICPA. Includes the balance sheet approach to the systematic study of the theory as well as the analysis of financial statements. (Cross listed with GACT 528.)

Prerequisite: ACT 327.

 

ACT 380

Nonprofit Accounting and Finance

3 credit hours

An overview of accounting and finance concepts as they pertain to nonprofit organizations. Emphasizes the balance sheet, cash flow statement, and accounting and finance systems for non-financial managers, administrators, and employees of nonprofit organizations. Special consideration is given to managerial skills required to sustain and enhance the performance of nonprofit organizations through the accounting and finance process of reporting, compliance, research, analysis, interpretation, and application. (Cross listed with GACT 580.)

Prerequisite: ACT 215.

 

ACT 432

Managerial Cost Accounting

3 credit hours

A study of basic cost relationships, cost systems design, variance analysis, CVP analysis, and standard costing techniques. Considers the relative income effects of alternative product-costing methods together with relevant cost evaluations and inventory planning and control techniques. (Cross listed with GACT 533.)

Prerequisite: ACT 216.

 

ACT 435

Accounting Information Systems

3 credit hours

Examines accounting information systems as an integrated framework within a business entity. Highlighted topics include data retrieval for report preparation, evaluation of accounting information systems, and the design of charts of accounts. Discusses the role of accounting systems, controls, and auditing. (Cross listed with GACT 570.)

Prerequisite: ACT 216.

 

ACT 439

Auditing

3 credit hours

A course designed to acquaint the student with the theoretical knowledge to successfully perform the attest function. Although practical knowledge is best acquired while working with actual records, problems and case studies are used extensively to give practical exposure to the student. (Cross listed with GACT 539.)

Prerequisite: ACT 328.

 

ACT 442

Federal Income Tax Accounting

3 credit hours

A study of personal federal income tax accounting designed primarily to acquaint the student with both an exhaustive study of personal income tax and a brief explanation of the basic differences between the personal income tax regulations and the corporate income tax regulations. (Cross listed with GACT 542.)

Prerequisite: ACT 216.

 

ACT 443

Advanced Tax Accounting

3 credit hours

Continued study of the Internal Revenue Code and regulations considering advanced aspects of income, deductions, exclusions, and credits, especially as they relate to partnerships, corporations, LLCs, and LLPs. Includes problems that require research utilizing return preparation software and various tax reference services. (Cross listed with GACT 543.)

Prerequisite: ACT 442.

 

ACT 451

Accounting Internship

1-3 credit hours

A special problem in accounting for the student of special ability in lieu of a regular course. It is also possible, upon receiving written approval from the instructor, to obtain an on-the-job apprenticeship for one semester to provide data for writing a formal paper. (Credit is determined by the nature and scope of the project.)

Restriction: Accounting majors only.

 

ACT 462

Advanced Accounting I

3 credit hours

An in-depth study of business combinations, consolidated financial statements, and accounting for partnership creation, operation, dissolution, and liquidation. Emphasizes worksheet techniques for the preparation of consolidated statements. (Cross listed with GACT 532.)

Prerequisite: ACT 328.

 

ACT 463

Advanced Accounting II

3 credit hours

Completes the study of financial accounting theory begun in ACT 327. Covers various topics, with primary emphasis on not-for-profit accounting (for government, universities, hospitals, and voluntary organizations), fiduciary accounting (for estates, trusts, and insolvent companies), and advanced financial statement presentations (interim reporting, foreign currency transactions, financial statements, segment reporting, and accounting for derivatives). (Cross listed with GACT 563.)

Prerequisite or corequisite: ACT 327.

 

ACT 471

Estate and Gift Taxation

3 credit hours

A broad overview of the federal transfer tax system including federal gift taxation, federal and state estate taxation, and federal generation-skipping transfer taxation. The course examines various forms of property ownership, transfers of those various ownerships, and related tax implications. (Cross listed with GACT 571.)

Prerequisites: ACT 215, 216, and 327.

 

ACT 474

Tax Seminar

3 credit hours

A tax seminar focused on various contemporary federal taxation, tax planning opportunities, and tax compliance issues. (Cross listed with GACT 574.)

Prerequisite: ACT 216.

 

ACT 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition of department chair.

 

 

ADVERTISING (ADV)

 

ADV 211

Workshop: Advertising

3 credit hours

Teaches students to work as part of a sales team with defined sales objectives in an active media sales office through ORU’s Student Media Publications. Provides experience in prospecting, cold calling, personal selling, contracting, customer service, and relationship-building activities to service both in-house and newly acquired accounts. Also includes creative services account support and collections of outstanding payments. Students use Adobe Creative Suite® and Microsoft Office® software. (May be repeated for credit.)

 

ADV 216

Advertising Fundamentals and Design

3 credit hours

An introduction to foundational theories and practical application of principles of advertising and marketing for print.

Prerequisite: INT 101.

Course fee: $40.

 

ADV 221

Branding, Promotions and Storytelling

3 credit hours

Study of a product, service, cause, or organizational promotional campaign. Branding, promotions, advertising, marketing, public relations, social media, graphic design, and primary and secondary research are studied and utilized in building a promotional package for the adopted class client.

 

ADV 320

Communication Research

3 credit hours

An introduction to commonly used marketing, advertising, and public relations research methods including survey research, focus groups, experiments, and content analysis. Research requires hands-on learning. Students complete multiple research projects that reflect industry research experiences.

 

ADV 421

Media Planning

3 credit hours

Provides students with a framework for understanding the role of strategic media planning and buying in the overall context of marketing and advertising decisions. Covers audience research as well as selection, evaluation and planning of all major advertising. Focuses on the media sales industry and ethical business selling and negotiation approaches.

Prerequisite: ADV 221 or MKT 130.

 

ADV 499

Senior Research Project

3 credit hours

Specialized research culminating in a senior paper and/ or other approved project.

Restriction: Permission of instructor required.

Course fee: $40.

 

ADV 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

arabic (ara)

 

ARA 101

Elementary Arabic I

4 credit hours

A beginning course in Arabic. Covers oral/aural work, vocabulary, grammar, and composition. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL novice-mid competencies. (This course does not count toward the Bachelor of Arts language requirement or a minor in Arabic but can be used for elective credit.)

Lab fee: $40.

 

ARA 102

Elementary Arabic II

4 credit hours

Builds on the skills from ARA 101. Includes oral/aural practice and covers additional vocabulary and grammar, including various verb tenses. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL novice-high competencies.

Prerequisite: ARA 101 with a grade of “C” or higher.

Lab fee: $40.

 

ARA 203

Intermediate Arabic I

3 credit hours

Continued study of Arabic with review of grammar and composition. Includes selected readings in addition to text. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL intermediate-low competencies.

Prerequisite: Proficiency examination or ARA 102 with a grade of “C” or higher.

Lab fee: $40.

 

ARA 204

Intermediate Arabic II

3 credit hours

An intensive practical conversational workshop. Grammar review, vocabulary expansion, with emphasis on spoken Arabic, both oral and aural skills. Includes presentations, videos, and additional means to promote active student participation. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL intermediate mid-level competencies.

Prerequisite: ARA 203 with a grade of “C” or higher.

 

ARA 219

Travel Study

3 credit hours

A two-week trip to an Arabic-speaking country. Includes an in-depth study of history, geography, and art. Students learn everyday customs and have an opportunity to put grammar principles to practical use. (May substitute for ARA 203 to fulfill general education language requirement only).

Prerequisite: ARA 102 or demonstrated proficiency.

 
ARA 301

Phonetics and Conversation

3 credit hours

Instruction in advanced conversation for proficiency with practical phonetics and drills for improvement of students’ aural-oral skills. Focuses on particular problem areas for English speakers, such as difficult vowels and consonants, correct usage of ‘liaisons,” silent e’s, intonations, rhythms, accents, and pauses. Includes speech patterns ranging from versification to slang of different degrees. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL intermediate-high competencies. (Taught in Arabic.)

Prerequisite: ARA 204 or equivalent.

 

ARA 302

Literature and Composition

3 credit hours

A course to develop writing skills using applied stylistic analysis and practical compositional exercises. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL intermediate-high competencies. (Taught in Arabic.)

Prerequisite: ARA 204.

 

ARA 305

Civilization and Culture

3 credit hours

A study of the historical, political, and cultural development of China with emphasis on contemporary aspects. Coves most activities listed in the ACTFL intermediate-high competencies. (Taught in Arabic.)

Prerequisite: ARA 204 or equivalent.

 

ARA 450

Internship

1-3 credit hours

Systematic and supervised practicum in a Arabic-speaking community. Application of Arabic oral communication and writing skills. Credit varies, depending on time involved on-site.

Prerequisite: ARA 204.

Restriction: Permission of the department chair required.

Lab fee: $30.00

 

ARA 451

Special Readings

1-3 credit hours

Special readings course in Arabic to cover general or specific areas as determined by the professor to meet the need of the student.

Restrictions: Arabic minor, arrangement with professor, and departmental permission.

 

 

ART (ART)

 

ART 101

Fundamentals of Art I

3 credit hours

The study and application of the visual elements and principles of visual organization in the second dimension. Includes an introduction to lateral thinking as it applies to the generation of ideas. Includes devotions to help validate the student’s call as a Christian artist. (Class contact for lecture and studio—6 hours per week.)

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 102

Fundamentals of Art II

3 credit hours

A continuation of Art 101 with an emphasis on the application of the principles of design to the third dimension. (Class contact for lecture and studio—6 hours per week.)

Prerequisite: ART 101 or permission of the instructor.

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 103

Art History Survey I

3 credit hours

A study of the world arts, artists, and their cultures from prehistoric times through the Gothic Period. (Crosslisted with HUM 250.)

Course fee: $15.

 

ART 104

Art History Survey II

3 credit hours

A study of world painting, sculpture, and architecture from the birth of the Italian Renaissance through the eighteenth century. (Crosslisted with HUM 255.)

Course fee: $15.

 

ART 106

Elementary and Secondary Methods/Evaluation

1 - 3 credit hours

A seminar class including--but not limited to--pertinent subjects, guest speakers from the education community, demonstrations, and exercises that are outside the scope of other art courses. (Can be taken more than once for credit.)

 

ART 107

Digital Fundamentals

3 credit hours

An introduction to contemporary graphic design software titles relating to the production of design artifacts across a diverse range of media–word process, vector, raster, page layout, web, and motion. The course will focus on visual problem solving through the tools of digital technology. (Class contact for lecture and studio–6 hours.)

Prerequisite: Design Technology Requirement.

Course Fee: $40.

 

ART 201

Ceramics I

3 credit hours

The study of a variety of hand-building techniques. It includes a study of form and generation of ideas in clay with an introduction to the application of glaze and loading and firing a kiln. (Class contact for lecture and studio—6 hours per week.)

Course fee: $80.

 

ART 202

Sculpture I

3 credit hours

Develops student skills in the methods and study of the sculptural form. Emphasizes methods, materials, concepts, and artistic style. (Class contact for lecture and studio—6 hours per week.)

Prerequisite: ART 102.

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 203

Painting I

3 credit hours

An introduction to the materials and techniques of oil painting. Emphasizes color, surface, and composition. Traditional to contemporary styles are explored. (Class contact for lecture and studio—6 hours per week.)

Prerequisites: ART 101, 213, and 214.

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 204

Printmaking I

3 credit hours

A course covering the basic media and processes involved in the relief and intaglio processes, serigraphy, and creative printmaking. (Class contact for lecture and studio—6 hours per week.)

Prerequisites: ART 101 and 213.

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 205

Typography

3 credit hours

Intermediate application of language, letterforms, and accompanying devices across a diverse range of media. Development of visual and audible representation of language to solve complex communication requirements. Develops theoretical and technical design skills including organization, hierarchy, aesthetics, and production technology. Assessment via written and verbal critiques, research, analysis, and descriptions of project-based work. (Class contact for lecture and studio—6 hours per week.)

Prerequisites: ART 101, 118, 218, and design technology requirement.

Course fee: $40.

 
ART 213

Drawing

3 credit hours

A course intended to develop the student’s understanding of the basic concepts of drawing and their powers of observation. Students work with various media utilizing a variety of sources and environments (Class contact for lecture and studio—6 hours per week.)

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 214

Figure Drawing

3 credit hours

Introduction to fundamentals of drawing the human figure from gesture to finished work. Emphasis on shape, form, value, structure, and individual expression. (Class contact for lecture and studio—6 hours per week.)

Prerequisite: ART 213.

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 218

Graphic Design I

3 credit hours

Introductory application of visual literacy and cognitive strategies to aide in solving communication problems using appropriate technology. Introduction to procedures and methodologies for problem identification, research, analysis, and evaluation. Assessment via written and verbal critiques, research, analysis, and descriptions of project-based work. (Class contact for lecture and studio—6 hours per week.)

Prerequisite: ART 101.

Corequisite: ART 118.

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 223

Crafts

3 credit hours

A survey course of craft techniques for the beginning student. Historical and cultural concepts with practical application. (Class contact for lecture and studio—6 hours per week.)

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 304

Advanced Printmaking

3 credit hours

Extensive exploration in studio problems with emphasis on historical and current issues as they apply to individual direction and expression on printmaking. (Class contract for lecture and studio-6 hours per week. Course can be repeated for credit for up to six hours).

Prerequisite: ART 204.

Course fee: $15.

 

ART 307

Art History Survey III

3 credit hours

A survey and topical study of issues in the nineteenth and twentieth century art of Europe and North America.

Course fee: $15.

 

ART 313

Advanced Drawing

3 credit hours

Advanced Drawing will continue to develop the student’s understanding of the concepts of drawing. Students will continue to develop ther skills in media by using a variety of sources and environments. (Class contact for lecture and studio-6 hours per week. Course can be repeated for credit up to six hours)

Prerequisite: ART 213.

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 315

Advanced Painting

3 credit hours

Extensive exploration in studio programs with emphasis on historical and current issues as they apply to individual expression in painting (Class contact for lecture and studio-6 hours per week. Course can be repeated for credit up to six hours)

Prerequisite: ART 203.

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 318

Graphic Design II

3 credit hours

Intermediate application of aesthetic principles to design media, including visual hierarchy, identity, organization, and artifacts with social and cultural implications across a wide variety of media. Development of conceptual understanding relating to the competencies and principles integral to design. Complex communication and usability problem solving via analysis and usability testing. Includes an introduction to the history, theory, and criticism of design. Assessment via written and verbal critiques, research, analysis, and descriptions of project-based work. (Class contact for lecture and studio—6 hours per week.)

Prerequisite: ART 218.

Corequisite: ART 118.

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 321

Advanced Ceramics

3 credit hours

Extensive exploration in studio problems with emphasis on historical and current issues as they apply to individual expression in ceramics. (Class contact for lecture and studio-6 hours per week. Course can be repeated for credit up to six hours)

Prerequisite: ART 201.

Course fee: $80.

 

ART 331

Illustration

3 credit hours

An introduction to the historic and contemporary materials, techniques, and processes of illustration. Addresses the creation of communicative solutions through conceptual development, compositional variation, and the characteristics of various media. Assessment via written and verbal critiques, research, analysis, and descriptions of project-based work. (Class contact for lecture and studio—6 hours per week.)

Prerequisites: ART 101 and 213.

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 333

Watercolor

3 credit hours

Watercolor will develop skills in watercolor painting, stressing form and composition, visual perception, and individual expression. (Class contact for lecture and studio--6 hours per week.)

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 341

Advanced Sculpture

3 credit hours

Extensive exploration in studio problems with emphasis on historical and current issues as they apply to individual expression in sculpture. (Class contact for lecture and studio-6 hours per week. Course can be repeated for credit up to six hours)

Prerequisite: ART 202.

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 355

Graphic Design Studio

1.5-3 credit hours

Introduction to characteristic procedures relating professional practice via a studio environment. Problem solving, prototype development, usability testing, and technical delivery of diverse client-based projects. Assessment via written and verbal critiques, research, analysis, and descriptions of project-based work. (Class contact for studio—5 hours per week. Course can be repeated for credit for up to six hours.)

Prerequisites: ART 218, 318, and design technology requirement.

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 363

Black and White Photography

3 credit hours

A course in basic photographic procedure using black and white film with available light. Includes use of both camera and darkroom equipment, composition through the viewfinder of the camera and through the lens of the enlarger, development of film and paper, contact printing, cropping, and mounting. Also includes the application of visual devices (art elements and art principles) to photography. (Class contact for lecture and studio—6 hours per week.)

Prerequisites: ART 101, 102, and 213.

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 365

Digital Photography

3 credit hours

A course in basic photographic procedures using digital SLR camera and available light. Includes use of the camera to control mode, ISO, white balance, focus exposure, framing, and other parameters. Uses a photo-journalistic approach (i.e., storytelling through imaging) with a final project demonstrating technical knowledge and artistic competence. (Class contact for lecture and studio—6 hours per week.)

Prerequisite: ART 101.

Course fee: $60.

 

ART 378

Motion Design

3 credit hours

Intermediate and advanced application of moving images, animation, and interactive navigation across a diverse range of media. Development of visual and audible representation of movement to solve complex communication requirements. Assessment via written and verbal critiques, research, analysis, and descriptions of project-based work. (Class contact for lecture and studio—6 hours per week.) (Can be taken more than once for credit.)

Prerequisite: ART 218 and design technology requirement.

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 435

Advanced Photography

3 credit hours

The application of advanced tools and techniques of photography. Exploration of personal expression and client satisfaction developed through the critique process. Assessment via verbal critiques, analysis, and descriptions of project-based work. (Class contact for lecture and studio--6 hours.) (Can be repeated once for credit.)

Prerequisites: ART 101 and 365.

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 442

Web Design

3 credit hours

Intermediate and advanced application of two and three-dimensional design principles to web page and web site design. Includes perceptual, psychological, and functional conventions of electronic network media. Develops theoretical and technical multimedia design skills including HTML, CSS, FTP, multimedia integration and usability. (Can be taken more than once for credit.)

Prerequisites: ART 318 and design technology requirement.

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 452

Directed Study

1-3 credit hours

Supervised study within a chosen discipline.

Restriction: Permission of instructor.

Course fee: $40 for directed study in ceramics, photography, print, media, and sculpture.

 

ART 453

Practicum Infield Study

3 credit hours

Provides the senior graphic design student with the opportunity to work full time for an entire semester in a fully equipped state-of-the-art graphics studio, producing art and design projects for an international media ministry. (Class contact for studio—6 hours.)

Prerequisites: ART 353, advisor consent, and design technology requirement.

Course fee: $40.

 

ART 499

Senior Project

3 credit hours

A course with an emphasis on portfolio preparation and presentation.

Restriction: Permission of department.

 

ART 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE (ASL)

 

ASL 111

Beginning American Sign Language

3 credit hours

A beginning study of American Sign Language. (This course is for elective credit only.)

 

 

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING (BE)

 

BE 310

Biomedical Engineering Survey

3 credit hours

A survey course of the theory and principles of biosystems and biomedical instrumentation.

Prerequisites: BIO 111/111L, CHE 111/111L, PHY 111/111L, and MAT 211.

Course fee: $55.

 

BE 450

Special Topics

3 credit hours

Courses of current interest.

Restriction: Permission from instructor.

Course fee: $55.

 

BE 495

Directed Study

1-3 credit hours

Directed study on problems of limited scope approved on an individual basis. May require written and/or oral presentation.

Restrictions: Arrangement with professor and approval of department chair.

 

BE 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

BIBLICAL STUDIES (BIB)

 

BIB 222

Old Testament Introduction

3 credit hours

A general introduction to the various books of the Old Testament dealing with the problems of canon, authorship, composition, date of writing, and providing some background in the cultural, historical, geographical, and archaeological setting in which the Bible events occurred.

 

BIB 251

Biblical Greek I

3 credit hours

The beginning course in the study of Biblical Greek, emphasizing grammar and basic vocabulary.

 

BIB 252

Biblical Greek II

3 credit hours

A continuation of Biblical Greek I with an emphasis on reading the Greek text of the New Testament and identifying grammatical forms. This completes the student’s preparation for basic Greek exegetical and hermeneutical study of the New Testament.

Prerequisite: BIB 251.

 

BIB 261

New Testament Introduction

3 credit hours

A general introduction to the various books of the New Testament with an emphasis on content and an examination of questions such as authorship, source, reliability, and canonicity.

 

BIB 302

Historical Geography of the Holy Land

3 credit hours

A study of the geography and history of Palestine since antiquity, especially in relation to the nation of Israel and the Early Church.

 

BIB 303

Jewish Civilization

3 credit hours

Explores Jewish civilization as expressions of history, faith, culture, social, and religious practice of the Jewish people.

 

BIB 306

Hermeneutics: Principles of Biblical Interpretation

3 credit hours

A study of the problems and methods of Biblical interpretation, including the factors of presuppositions, historical context, grammatical relationships, vocabulary, figurative language, and genre.

 

BIB 311

Biblical Hebrew I

3 credit hours

A basic introduction to Biblical Hebrew. Introduces students to the fundamentals of Biblical Hebrew grammar, morphology, and syntax. Also emphasizes developing reading skills in the Biblical text.

 

BIB 312

Biblical Hebrew II

3 credit hours

A continuation of Biblical Hebrew I with an emphasis on reading the Hebrew text of the Old Testament and identifying grammatical forms. This completes the student’s preparation for basic Hebrew exegetical and hermeneutical study of the Old Testament.

Prerequisite: BIB 311.

 

BIB 313

Jewish History and Culture of New Testament Times

3 credit hours

A study of the Jewish historical, cultural, and ideological matrix of the New Testament and early Christianity.

 

BIB 319

Hebrew Exegesis

3 credit hours

An exegetical study of selected Old Testament passages. Attention is given to sound exegetical method and to critical problems and hermeneutics of the passages. Also studies doctrinal significance.

Prerequisite: BIB 312.

 

BIB 332

Old Testament Historical Books

3 credit hours

A study of the two major histories in the Old Testament and ancient Israel in its historical and cultural milieu. Concentrates on the period from the monarchy to the conquest of Palestine by the Romans. Gives attention to the religious institutions, worship, and formative theological ideas.

Prerequisites: BIB 222, 306, and THE 217.

 

BIB 346

Luke-Acts

3 credit hours

A study of the Gospel of Luke and the Book of Acts. Covers the Lukan redactional emphasis as well as a review of the content. Also examines events in the life of Jesus in the Early Church and in the journeys of Paul.

Prerequisites: BIB 261, 306, and THE 217.

 

BIB 349

Israel in Christian Theology

3 credit hours

Presents an overall theological perspective on Israel in Christian theology. Discusses the pertinent questions of Israel in Biblical exegesis, patristic literature, and Christian theology.

 

BIB 351

Greek Exegesis I

3 credit hours

An intermediate study of New Testament Greek to develop reading vocabulary and exegetical skills through intensive study of selected passages in the Greek New Testament. (May be repeated for credit.)

Prerequisite: BIB 252.

 

BIB 352

Greek Exegesis II

3 credit hours

Exegetical study of selected portions of the Greek New Testament, applying and developing exegetical skills and knowledge of the language and content of the New Testament writings. (May be repeated for credit.)

Prerequisite: BIB 351.

 

BIB 358

Turkey Study Tour

3 credit hours

A study trip investigating the geographical, historical, archaeological, and cultural setting of Asia Minor (Anatolia) in the New Testament times. Students visit many of the Biblical sites in Turkey related to Paul’s three missionary journeys, the communities of Peter, and the seven churches addressed in John’s Revelation.

 

BIB 362

Jesus and the Gospels

3 credit hours

A study of the life and teachings of Jesus Christ, as presented in the Gospels and early Christian literature.

Prerequisites: BIB 261, 306, and THE 217.

 

BIB 363

Eschatology and the Book of Revelation

3 credit hours

A study of Old and New Testament Teachings on eschatology, including those aspects of the Kingdom of God already present and those yet to be fulfilled. Specific attention is given to concepts such as Messiah, resurrection, tribulation, millennium, judgment, signs of the times, and Kingdom of God. (May be taken for either Old Testament or New Testament elective.)

Prerequisites: BIB 261, BIB 306, and THE 217.

 

BIB 364

The Pauline Epistles

3 credit hours

A study of the ministry and teachings of the Apostle Paul as recorded in the Pauline Epistles. The life setting of each letter is related to Paul’s journeys described in the book of Acts. Special attention is given to the major theological themes of the epistles.

Prerequisites: BIB 261, 306, and THE 217.

 

BIB 372

Johannine Literature

3 credit hours

An exegetical study of the Gospel and Epistles of John. The study explicates the literary and theological themes related to these books. Investigates key historical issues, such as authorship, date, and community.

Prerequisites: BIB 261, 306, and THE 217.

 

BIB 376

Hebrews and General Epistles

3 credit hours

An analysis of Hebrews, James, I and II Peter, and Jude, as seen in the light of their original historical settings and their relevance for today.

Prerequisites: BIB 261, 306, and THE 217.

 

BIB 401

Israel Study Trip

3 credit hours

Explores the land of the Bible through field experience, expert guidance with scholarly precision, and directed study of the cultural background of early Christianity.

Students participate in a specialized tour of the Holy Land as they study the Bible.

 

BIB 421

Pentateuch

3 credit hours

A study of the first five books of the Bible, treating historical beginnings, content of the covenant, and worship. Introduces the student to the cultural, geographical, and historical milieu of the Pentateuch.

Prerequisites: BIB 222, 306, and THE 217.

 

BIB 424

Hebrew Prophets

3 credit hours

A study of the major and minor prophets and their writings. An introduction to the origin and development of prophecy among the Hebrews, a study of the Hebrew prophets who lived and preached in the nations of Judah and Israel during the first millennium B.C., and an examination of the historical, social, and religious implications of their message.

Prerequisites: BIB 222, 306, and THE 217.

 

BIB 437

Psalms and Wisdom Literature

3 credit hours

A study of the wisdom books of the Old Testament (Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes) and of the action books (Psalms, Song of Solomon, and Lamentations). Emphasizes Hebrew poetry and its relation to other ancient literature, including Ecclesiasticus and Wisdom of Solomon.

Prerequisites: BIB 222, 306, and THE 217.

 

BIB 438

Intertestamental Literature

3 credit hours

A historical study of the intertestamental period with emphasis on readings from the literature of this period such as the apocrypha, pseudepigrapha, and the Dead Sea Scrolls. (May be taken for either Old Testament or New Testament elective.)

Prerequisites: BIB 222 and 261.

 

BIB 453

Jewish Perspectives on the Bible

3 credit hours

Topics vary by semester. Attention is given to critical and theological problems, relevant bibliography, contributions of significant scholars, and contemporary issues in interpretation.

 

BIB 455

Intensive Studies

3 credit hours

Specialized program of research and development of knowledge and skills in the area of Biblical studies.

Prerequisites: BIB 222, 306, and THE 217.

 

BIB 457

Honors Assistant Practicum

3 credit hours

A practicum in which the student works one-on-one with an ORU teacher to improve skills in course preparation and administration, time management, tutoring, and communication. The student has opportunities to become involved with professional teaching and/or research on the baccalaureate level in Biblical literature, theology, and church ministries.

 

BIB 483

The Jewish and Rabbinic Background to the Gospels

3 credit hours

A study of the historical, cultural, and religious background to the life and teachings of Jesus in light of early Jewish sources. Also examines post-Biblical Jewish literature to gain fresh insights into the Gospels and message of Jesus.

 

BIB 499

Senior Paper

3 credit hours

Designed research and writing project for seniors studying under the personal guidance of a professor, with each doing specialized research in Biblical literature.

Prerequisite: THE 217.

 

BIB 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

BIOLOGY (BIO)

 

BIO 101

Principles of Biology Lecture

3 credit hours

A study of the main principles of life common to both plants and animals, including scientific methods, levels of organization, cell structure and function, photosynthesis, respiration, molecular and Mendelian genetics, reproduction, development, evolution, classification, behavior and ecology, and their appropriate applications for solving current biological problems. (Open to biology majors by permission. BIO 101 and BIO 111 may not both be taken for credit.)

Corequisite: BIO 101L.

 

BIO 101L

Principles of Biology Laboratory

1 credit hour

Lab exercises, experiments, and audiovisual presentations involving cells, respiration, photosynthesis, classical and molecular genetics, protein synthesis, enzyme action, reproduction, development, behavior, and ecology.

Corequisite: BIO 101.

Lab fee: $25.

 

BIO 104

Tropical Biology

4 credit hours

A 9-day biology lecture and lab field trip to Puerto Rico or other location that introduces students to the biodiversity of tropical ecosystems. Emphasis is on habitats, organisms, biological relationships, conservation, stewardship of the planet, and the human impact on the environment. (Counts for general education or elective credit only.)

 

BIO 105

Introductory Biology and Chemistry

3 credit hours

A foundational course that teaches students to use a variety of learning techniques to develop an understanding of core principles and mathematical methods in biology and chemistry in preparation for BIO 111 and CHE 111. Emphasizes biological definitions and processes and acquaints students with the periodic table, chemical structures, and chemical calculation techniques. (Crosslisted with CHE 105.)

Restriction: Freshman standing and ACT composite score between 20 and 22 or SAT score between 940 and 1040.

 

BIO 111

Introductory Biology I Lecture

3 credit hours

An introduction to the study of general biology covering the scientific method, levels of organization, the cell, photosynthesis, respiration, classical and molecular genetics, and vertebrate anatomy and physiology. This is one of four courses (in addition to BIO 111L, 112, and 112L) comprising a sequence designed to serve as prerequisites to all other biology courses and as a comprehensive introduction to the study of biology. This series provides the biology major with the basic language and conceptual foundation for a major leading to a career in biological or preprofessional health-related fields. These courses are prerequisites to all other biology courses from which biology and pre-professional health career majors make their choices depending upon individual goals, interests, and departmental requirements. (Designed for biology majors and minors and pre-health profession majors.) (Honors sections are available for this course.)

Corequisite: BIO 111L.

 

BIO 111L

Introductory Biology I Laboratory

1 credit hour

A course designed to complement and supplement BIO 111 Lecture. Student learns by handling glassware, chemicals, organisms, and equipment; by observing, forming hypotheses, conducting experiments, analyzing data, and making conclusions; and by working in a more individualized atmosphere than is possible in the classroom. Includes dissection of a fetal pig. (Honors sections are available for this course.)

Corequisite: BIO 111.

Lab fee: $50.

 

BIO 112

Introductory Biology II Lecture

3 credit hours

An introduction to the taxonomy and characteristic structural and functional attributes of plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. Includes evolution, ecology, and behavior. Prerequisite: One semester of biology.

Corequisite: BIO 112L.

 

BIO 112L

Introductory Biology II Laboratory

1 credit hour

One 3-hour lab session each week devoted to the comparison, manipulation, identification, and dissection of selected specimens representative of different plant or animal groups.

Corequisite: BIO 112.

Lab fee: $50.

 

BIO 200

Human Cadaver Dissection

1 credit hour

An introductory laboratory course that presents the techniques and skills necessary to study the structure of the human organism. Models and cadavers are used for the dissection and study of the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, urinary, respiratory, endocrine, nervous, reproductive, gastrointestinal, and lymphatic systems. (Meets for one 3-hour lab per week. Does not count toward a major in biology.)

Prerequisite: 3.0 GPA, declared major with pre-med concentration, and permission of instructor.

Lab fee: $100.

 

BIO 209

Methods in Biotechnology

1 credit hour

Introduction to the latest cutting edge techniques used in the field of biotechnology. Laboratory activities include isolation and characterization of bacterial DNA, basic processes of DNA transfer, DNA finger printing, DNA sequencing, Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), tissue culture, Enzyme Linked Immuno-sorbant Assay (ELISA), and bioinformatics. (One 3-hour lab period per week.)

Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or higher in BIO 111L. Also includes a listening and speaking component.

Lab fee: $100.

 

BIO 212

Principles of Microbiology Lecture

3 credit hours

A study of the characteristics and importance of microorganisms with emphasis on their pathogenicity, control and relationships to health and disease designed for nursing majors. (This course does not count as upper division biology credit.)

Prerequisites: One semester each of general biology and chemistry, both with labs.

Corequisite: BIO 212L.

 

BIO 212L

Principles of Microbiology Laboratory

1 credit hour

An introduction to microbiology lab techniques including isolation, cultivation, characterization, and identification of micro-organisms designed for nursing majors. This course does not count as upper division biology credit. (One 3-hour lab period per week.)

Corequisite: BIO 212.

Lab fee: $100.

 

BIO 259

Medical Terminology

2 credit hours

Studies Greek and Latin word roots, prefixes, and suffixes commonly used in biology, science, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and other health professions.

Restriction: Permission of instructor required.

 

BIO 310

Microbiology Lecture

3 credit hours

A study of the classification, cultivation, physiology, growth, morphology, pathogenicity, and economic importance of micro-organisms, with emphasis on bacteria.

Prerequisites: One semester each of general biology and chemistry, both with labs; BIO 209.

Corequisite: BIO 310L.

 

BIO 310L

Microbiology Laboratory

1 credit hour

An introduction to microbiology lab techniques including isolation, cultivation, characterization, and identification of micro-organisms. (One 3-hour lab period per week.)

Corequisite: BIO 310.

Lab fee: $100.

 

BIO 311

Medical Genetics Lecture

3 credit hours

An introduction to the principles of heredity including Mendelian, molecular, and population genetics with an emphasis at the molecular level.

Prerequisites: One year of biology and BIO 209 required; statistics recommended.

Corequisite: BIO 311L.

 

BIO 311L

Medical Genetics Laboratory

1 credit hour

An opportunity to make crosses using Drosophila and other organisms, analyze data, and form conclusions. Other experiments demonstrate and complement the information being taught in the lecture portion.

Prerequisites: One year each of general chemistry and introductory biology, both with labs; BIO 209.

Corequisite: BIO 311.

Lab fee: $100.

 
BIO 312

Human Ecology Lecture

3 credit hours

A study of the interrelationships of plants and animals (including humans) with their environments. Topics include the ecosystems concept, biogeochemical cycles, energy flow, environmental factors, behavior, populations, communities, major ecosystems of the world, and Christian earthkeeping.

Prerequisites: One year each of general chemistry and introductory biology (with lab).

Corequisite: BIO 312L.

 

BIO 312L

Human Ecology Laboratory

1 credit hour

Field and lab investigations of both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems on a quantitative basis. (One 4-hour lab period per week.)

Corequisite: BIO 312.

Lab fee: $50.

 

BIO 360

Readings in Biology

1 credit hour

Directed readings and reports on topics of special interest to the student and approved by the instructor.

Prerequisites: One course in biology and permission of the instructor.

 

BIO 372

Introduction to Biological Research

1 credit hour

A course designed to introduce junior-level biology majors to scientific research in preparation for conducting their senior research projects. Introduces students to the nature of science and its methods and teaches the distinction between a “literature review” and “experimental” research project. Students then select a research topic, a research director for the senior research project. Students design an experimental project and write a research proposal.

 

BIO 410

Medical Parasitology Lecture

3 credit hours

Designed to introduce biology and nursing majors to the field of medical parasitology. Emphasis is placed on life cycles, pathology, modes of transmisson, prevention and treatment, and the diagnostic stages of medically important parasites. 

Restrictions: Student must be a biology major or minor, pre-medicine, international community development or nursing major or have permission from the instructor.

Corequisite: BIO 410L.

 

BIO 410L

Medical Parasitology Lab

1 credit hour

Discussion of procurement, handling and preparation of clinical specimens for laboratory analysis will be discussed.

Corequisite: BIO 410.

Lab fee: $100.

 

BIO 411

Molecular Cell Biology Lecture

3 credit hours

An introductory survey of biological processes of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells with special emphasis on the structure and function relationships, current biochemical theory and techniques, and the molecular basis of genetics and heredity.

Prerequisites: CHE 111 and 112 lectures and labs; BIO 111 and 112 lectures and labs; BIO 209, BIO 310 with a minimum semester grade of  "C".

Corequisite: BIO 411L.

 

BIO 411L

Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory

1 credit hour

Introduction to modern techniques frequently used in the study of molecular biology. Lab techniques studied include native gel electrophoresis, protein fingerprinting, peptide mapping, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, restriction digestion of plasmid DNA, cell fractionation and subcellular organelle isolation, DNA extraction, and DNA gel electrophoresis.

Corequisite: BIO 411.

Lab fee: $100.

 

BIO 421

General and Comparative Physiology Lecture

3 credit hours

Studies basic physiological principles, as exhibited by various mechanisms in different animals. Functions considered in the course include permeability, excitability, energy production, maintenance of health, and production of offspring.

Prerequisites: One year each of general biology and general chemistry both with labs.

Corequisite: BIO 421L.

 

BIO 421L

General and Comparative Physiology Laboratory

1 credit hour

Studies how internal and external conditions affect body functions of different organisms including the human. (One 3-hour lab per week.)

Corequisite: BIO 421.

Lab fee: $50.

 

BIO 429

Secondary Methods: Science

1 credit hour

A course designed to prepare science education students with ideas and practical knowledge for the classroom. Focuses on materials and methods of teaching biology, chemistry, physics, and physical science. (Intended to be taken three times.)

 

BIO 431

Developmental Biology Lecture

3 credit hours

A study of the ontogeny, morphogenesis, genetic and environmental factors, aggregation, differentiation, hormonal controls, and coordination of both plant and animal development.

Prerequisites: One year each of general biology and general chemistry; BIO 370.

Corequisite: BIO 431L.

 

BIO 431L

Developmental Biology Laboratory

1 credit hour

One 3-hour lab session per week with equal emphasis and time given to the study of prepared microscope slides and experimental manipulation of living, developing chickens, frogs, and sea urchins.

Corequisite: BIO 431.

Lab fee: $100.

 

BIO 451

Biology Seminar

1 credit hour

Provides an opportunity for seniors to make a professional presentation of their senior project. Each presentation is evaluated by student, peers, and faculty. Includes an assessment of overall biological knowledge by requiring the standardized ETS Biology Field Test. (Crosslisted with EVR 451.)

Restrictions: Biology major and senior standing.

Test fee: $30

 

BIO 454

Special Topics

1-4 credit hours

Selected topics in biology not covered in the core curriculum. A course designed for use by one student or groups under the guidance of a faculty member to study selected topics in biology that are not available by title in the catalog. (May be repeated once for credit if subject matter is different.)

Restrictions: Junior or senior biology majors or by consent of department chair and instructor.

Lab fee: $100.

 

BIO 456

Biomedical Ethics

3 credit hours

A capstone course for junior and senior biology students. Deals with ethical aspects of current biological technologies and issues such as creation-evolution, genetic engineering, biomedical issues, human population control, and environmental ethics, from a Christian perspective.

Prerequisite: 16 hours of biology.

 

BIO 457

Principles of Immunology Lecture

3 credit hours

A study of the basic biological concepts of immunology, which are fundamental to the participation in modern medicine, whether it be as a nurse, medical technologist, or physician. Presents immunology, a biological science, from the viewpoints of developmental biology, molecular biology, genetics, biochemistry, microbiology, anatomy, and medicine.

Prerequisites: BIO 310, 310L and CHE 211 with a grade of “C” or better; BIO 370. (Biochemistry, molecular cell biology, or genetics courses are recommended.)

Corequisite: BIO 457L.

 

BIO 457L

Principles of Immunology Laboratory

1 credit hour

Designed to allow students the opportunity to utilize the theories and concepts of immunology in practical, experimental projects. Emphasizes techniques involving serial dilutions, precipitation and agglutination reactions, nitrocellulose and gel electrophoresis, gel diffusion, isolation and identification of B-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes, immunoaffinity-based procedures and practice problem solving.

Prerequisites: BIO 310 and 310L and CHE 211 and 211L with a grade of “C” or better; BIO 370.

Corequisite: BIO 457.

Lab fee: $100.

 

BIO 458

Marine Ecology Lecture

3 credit hours

A course designed to familiarize the student with the physical, chemical, and biological factors of marine environments. Emphasis is on ecology. (Open to both science and non-science majors meeting the prerequisites.)

Prerequisites: BIO 101, 101L; 111, and 111L.

Corequisite: BIO 458 lab is strongly recommended.

 

BIO 458L

Marine Ecology Laboratory

1 credit hour

Designed to train students to apply many of the principles learned in the BIO 458 to the marine environment. The lab occurs primarily during the spring break trip to Cozumel, Florida, or Puerto Rico.

Prerequisites: BIO 101 and 101L or BIO 111 and 111L.

Corequisite: BIO 458.

Lab fee: $50.

 
BIO 499

Individual Research and Senior Paper

3 credit hours

Directed individual study for seniors pursuing research and the writing of the required senior paper.

Prerequisite: BIO 370 and BIO 372.

Restriction: Senior standing.

Lab fee: $50.

 

BIO 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

BIBLICAL LITERATURE (BLIT)

 

BLIT 110

Survey of Old Testament Literature

3 credit hours

A historical-thematic survey of the Old Testament. Gives special attention to the content of the Old Testament, with emphasis on the cultural, historical, and geographical background to the text and to the practical application of major Old Testament themes. Requires students to read through the Old Testament. (This course fulfills the general education requirement in Old Testament for non-theology majors. Honors sections are available for this course.)

 

BLIT 120

Survey of New Testament Literature

3 credit hours

A historical-thematic survey of the New Testament. Gives special attention to the content of the New Testament, with emphasis on the cultural, historical, and geographical background to the text and to the practical application of major New Testament themes. Requires students to read through the New Testament. (This course fulfills the general education requirement in New Testament for non-theology majors. Honors sections are available for this course.)

 

BLIT 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

BUSINESS (BUS)

 

BUS 099

Business Seminar

0 credit hour

Selected topics such as organizational behavior, human relations development, marketing, management, finance, accounting, computer applications, and international relations. (Undergraduate students in the College of Business need to take two of these seminars. One in the freshman year and one during senior year is recommended.) (Pass/fail only.)

 

BUS 201

Principles of Economics I (Macroeconomics)

3 credit hours

An overview of basic economic concepts and institutions. Modern national income formation theory; economic fluctuations, money, banking, monetary and fiscal policy; economic stabilization theory and policy; the public sector, aggregate demand, aggregate supply, Keynesian Theory, monetary theory; theory of economic growth and development; and comparative economic systems.

 

BUS 202

Principles of Economics II (Microeconomics)

3 credit hours

Theory of markets, price mechanism, production, distribution, and resource allocation; application of marginal analysis and equilibrium theory to the price and output decisions of the individual firm in pure competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, and monopoly; agriculture; labor, rent, interest, and profit theory; international trade; the economics of change.

Prerequisite: BUS 201.

 

BUS 325

Business Law I

3 credit hours

An introductory course of a two-semester study of law as it affects business and commerce in the United States. The scope and study include an overview of the development and function of law—jurisprudence and procedure—as well as the basic features of constitutional law, criminal law, torts, contracts, and property. Law is approached as a set of “enforceable rights.”

Prerequisite: BUS 202.

Restriction: Senior standing.

 

BUS 326

Business Law II

3 credit hours

A continuation of BUS 325 with emphasis upon the Uniform Commercial Code, the Uniform Consumers Code, the Truth in Lending Act, and their effects on sales, commercial paper, creditor rights and secured transactions, consumer credit sales, consumer loans, disclosure statements, limitations on consumer liability, home solicitation sales, and consumer and creditor remedies. Also, the study of the law of agency, partnerships, special ventures, corporations, and real property.

Prerequisite: BUS 325.

Restriction: Senior standing.

 

BUS 361

International Business

3 credit hours

An introduction to the opportunities and challenges of transacting commerce in a global market. Topics of discussion include culture, communication, economics, finances, legal and political considerations, missions, and social responsibility. Overview of major trading areas include Africa, Asia, Europe, North and South America, the Middle East, and the Pacific Basin.

 

BUS 372

Business Ethics

3 credit hours

A study of the interrelationships among individuals, business firms, service industries, nonprofit organizations, churches, and government in American society. Focuses on the issues and problems that confront the leaders exercising social responsibility and examines the nature and objectives of selected public policies impinging on business. Includes a comprehensive analysis and synthesis of philosophies that determine cultural values and an evaluation in terms of the student’s own personal value system. Addresses management’s role in upholding Christian principles as it interacts with government and society. (Cross listed with GBUS 572.)

 

BUS 450

Special Topics in Business

3 credit hours

A course designed to facilitate the study of contemporary issues germane to conducting business in the global economy. Content includes extensive reading and class discussion surrounding text materials and articles from leading business periodicals. Guest speakers provide direction to the discovery process and validate the course content.

 

BUS 451

Business Administration Internship

1-3 credit hours

A special problem in the area of business administration for the student of special ability in lieu of a regular course. Upon receiving written approval from the instructor, the student may obtain an on-the-job apprenticeship for one semester to provide data for writing a formal paper. (Credit received is determined by the nature and scope of the project. Honors sections are available for this course.)

Restriction: Business administration major.

 

BUS 454

International Business Internship

1-3 credit hours

Permits students with special ability to pursue a problem within the concentration. With written approval from the instructor, a student can obtain an on-the-job apprenticeship for one semester to provide data for writing a formal paper. (Credit received is determined by the nature and scope of the project.)

Restriction: International business major.

 

BUS 499

Senior Paper

3 credit hours

A capstone course that must be taken by all ORU College of Business seniors. The course emphasizes application of principles taught in lower-level business courses. The course contains two distinct but integrated phases: the seminar phase, which uses textbook readings and class discussion to provide an overview of the field of small business management, and the project phase, in which students write their senior paper.

Prerequisites: ACT 216, BUS 201, FIN 338, MGT 130 and MKT 130.

Restriction: Senior standing.

 

BUS 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Communication, Arts, and Media (CAM)

 

CAM 451

Communications Internship

1-3 credit hours

An arranged program of activities with a local employer for the development of communication skills in a job environment. Credit varies according to the job description. (May be taken for an additional three elective credits, as approved.)

Restrictions: Junior or senior standing and consent of the department.

 

CAM 453

Directed Study and Research

1-3 credit hours

A collaboration between student and professor on an approved topic. Content varies.

Restrictions: Junior or senior standing and consent of the department.

 

CAM 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Christian Care and Counseling (CCC)

 

CCC 301

Introduction to Christian Caregiving

3 credit hours

A study designed to examine the caring aspect of the Christian life from theoretical, theological, and practical perspectives. Implements the integration of the theoretical and theological perspectives with practical experiences and evaluation.

 

CCC 303

Issues and Identity of the Caregiver

3 credit hours

A study of the ethics, values, and litigation that affect the counseling field and professionals in that field. Examines the role of the professional counselor.

 

CCC 321

Pastoral Approaches to Counseling

3 credit hours

A study designed to acquaint students with the four basic paradigms of Christian counseling: insight-oriented, behavioral, cognitive, and faith healing. The philosophical assumptions and uses of specific techniques with each are explored.

 

CCC 324

Foundations of Personality Development

3 credit hours

A study of the principal interpretations of personality development, description, dynamics, and determinants.

Prerequisite: PSY 201.

 

CCC 332

Lifespan Development

3 credit hours

A study of human behavior in the social environment and the effect that environmental and psychological variables have upon the development of humans from conception to death. Gives special attention to the development of behaviors, attitudes, and problems specific to different subcultural and age groups, including the elderly.

 

CCC 339

Developing Helping Skills

3 credit hours

A study of the major theoretical concepts of counseling psychology presented with practical applications of those concepts in terms of counseling strategies and techniques. Expects the student to formulate appropriate hypotheses concerning representative client problems and propose competent methodologies/strategies for addressing those problems.

 

CCC 405

Crisis Intervention

3 credit hours

A study to acquaint the student with the nature and dynamics of crisis situations. Places emphasis upon intervention principles and procedures in the context of situational crises. The approach includes the concept of training the laity for basic crisis intervention.

 

CCC 411

Practical Applications of Helping Skills

3 credit hours

A counseling practicum designed to provide students with an opportunity to become acquainted with the practice of counseling. Working in various settings, students interact with counseling professionals and become familiar with counseling as it is practiced within an agency.

 

CCC 426

Assessment and Evaluation

3 credit hours

An introductory course for counselors. Its objective is to promote knowledge of and skills in assessment and evaluation.

 

CCC 429

Substance Abuse

3 credit hours

Presents the theological, ethical, moral, and practical considerations important in counseling those who are chemically dependent.

 

CCC 430

Special Issues in Counseling

3 credit hours

The study of contemporary problems, trends, or innovative developments in Christian counseling.

 

CCC 499

Senior Practicum/Project

3 credit hours

A capstone course in the form of a project or practicum related to the major.

 

 

Chemistry (CHE)

 

CHE 101

Principles of Chemistry Lecture

3 credit hours

An introductory course requiring no prior background in chemistry. Emphasizes applying chemical principles to everyday situations and acquaints the student with the periodic table and chemical nomenclature.

Corequisite: CHE 101L.

 

CHE 101L

Principles of Chemistry Laboratory

1 credit hour

A lab experience that provides the student with an opportunity to apply the scientific method focusing on the relationship of chemistry to daily life. (One-hour recitation per week immediately followed by a 3-hour lab. This is a writing-intensive course.)

Corequisite: CHE 101.

Lab fee: $50.

 

CHE 105

Introductory Biology and Chemistry

3 credit hours

A foundational course that teaches students to use a variety of learning techniques to develop an understanding of core principles and mathematical methods in biology and chemistry in preparation for BIO 111 and CHE 111. Emphasizes biological definitions and processes and acquaints students with the periodic table, chemical structures, and chemical calculation techniques. (Crosslisted with BIO 105.)

Prerequisite: ACT composite score between 20 and 22 or SAT score between 940 and 1040.

Restriction: Freshman standing.

 

CHE 111

General Chemistry I Lecture

3 credit hours

An introduction to the concepts of chemical bonding, electronic configurations, periodic trends, solution properties, chemical problem solving, and physical properties of gases. Teaches naming of inorganic ions and covalent molecules and dimensional analysis.

Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry and minimum score on the Chemistry placement test.

Corequisite: CHE 111L.

 

CHE 111L

General Chemistry I Laboratory

1 credit hour

A laboratory study of the properties of elements and simple covalent and inorganic materials. Measures physical and chemical properties. Experiments are conducted in stoichiometry, gas laws, atomic line spectra, replacement reactions, and others. (One hour recitation per week immediately followed by a 3-hour lab.)

Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or permission based on placement test.

Corequisite: CHE 111.

Lab fee: $50.

 

CHE 112

General Chemistry II Lecture

3 credit hours

Continues the basic study of the physical and chemical properties of matter. Topics include thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibria, colligative properties, and electro-chemistry.

Prerequisites: CHE 111 and 111L.

Corequisite: CHE 112L.

 

CHE 112L

General Chemistry II Laboratory

1 credit hour

The lab experience provides an opportunity to correlate the physical and chemical properties of different substances with concepts examined in the lecture. Experiments are conducted in kinetics, calorimetry, electrochemistry, and solutions. (One hour recitation per week immediately followed by a 3-hour lab. Honors sections are available for this course.)

Prerequisites: CHE 111 and 111L.

Corequisite: CHE 112.

Lab fee: $50.

 

CHE 211

Organic Chemistry I Lecture

3 credit hours

An introduction to organic structures and reactions. Course includes a review of general chemistry, alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, and polymers.

Prerequisites: CHE 112 and 112L.

Corequisite: CHE 211L.

 

CHE 211L

Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

1 credit hour

An introduction to methods of synthesis and analysis of pertinent organic reaction types. Project sessions give the student adequate training in the use of organic lab techniques and report writing. (One hour recitation per week immediately followed by a 3-hour lab.)

Prerequisites: CHE 112 and 112L.

Corequisite: CHE 211.

Lab fee: $50.

 

CHE 212

Organic Chemistry II Lecture

3 credit hours

A treatment of organic reactions and mechanisms as applied to synthesis. Gives special emphasis to spectroscopic methods of molecular structural identification. Emphasizes the major functional groups and arene chemistry.

Prerequisites: CHE 211 and 211L.

Corequisite: CHE 212L.

 

CHE 212L

Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

1 credit hour

Emphasizes the analysis of unknown organic mixtures. These mixtures are representative of the major functional group differences. Uses various spectroscopic instrumental methods in the analysis, (NMR, IR, UV, and mass spectrometry). (One hour recitation per week immediately followed by a 3-hour lab.)

Prerequisites: CHE 211 and 211L.

Corequisite: CHE 212.

Lab fee: $50.

 

CHE 300

Quantitative Analysis Lecture

2 credit hours

A study of inorganic and organic analyses based on chemical equilibrium as applied to chromatography, solubility, titrimetry, spectrophotometry, and electrochemistry.

Prerequisites: CHE 112 and 112L.

Corequisite: CHE 300L.

 

CHE 300L

Quantitative Analysis Laboratory

2 credit hours

An examination of quantitative methods of analysis of inorganic, organic, and biological samples. Integrates modern instrumentation (ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, potentiometric titration, and liquid chromatography) into the analyses. (Two 3-hour labs per week.)

Prerequisites: CHE 112 and 112L.

Corequisite: CHE 300.

Lab fee: $100.

 

CHE 303

Physical Chemistry I Lecture

3 credit hours

The mathematical modeling of chemical systems, including derivations and limitations of equations. Systems studied include gases, kinetics, and thermodynamics of chemical reactions and equilibrium.

Prerequisites: CHE 212 and 212L and MAT 201.

Corequisite: CHE 303L.

 

CHE 303L

Physical Chemistry I Laboratory

1 credit hour

Lab sessions in computer modeling of physical systems as well as a study of physical characteristics of molecules with IR, NMR, and UV spectroscopy emphasized. (One 3-hour lab per week.)

Prerequisites: CHE 112 and 112L; MAT 201.

Corequisite: CHE 303.

Lab fee: $100.

 

CHE 304

Physical Chemistry II

3 credit hours

An in-depth study of the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions with an emphasis on current tools of research employed in understanding reaction mechanisms and physical characteristics of molecules.

Prerequisites: CHE 303 and 303L.

 

CHE 400

Chemical Instrumentation Lecture

2 credit hours

The practical and theoretical investigation of principles, operating parameters, and applications of instruments used for chemical analysis. Gives special attention to electrochemistry and spectroscopy.

Prerequisites: CHE 300 and 300L.

Corequisite: CHE 400L.

 

CHE 400L

Chemical Instrumentation Laboratory

2 credit hours

Emphasis on projects that elucidate the lecture material along with pertinent electronics experiments. Most of the experiments are in spectroscopy, electrochemistry, radiochemistry, thermal analytical methods, and special topics. (Two 3-hour labs per week.)

Prerequisites: CHE 300 and 300L.

Corequisite: CHE 400.

Lab fee: $100.

 

CHE 449L

Chemistry Research Laboratory

1 credit hour

A coverage of the scientific method, problem selection, and proposal writing. Students begin their project bibliography and write a project proposal. (One-hour recitation per week followed by a 3-hour lab.)

Prerequisites: CHE 212 and 212L; CHE 400 and 400L.

Lab fee: $100.

 

CHE 452

Seminar

1 credit hour

A study of research methods. Attention is given to the American Chemical Society’s style guide for professional presentation techniques. Students give a formal presentation of the results of their projects.

Prerequisite: CHE 499.

 

CHE 455

Oncological Chemistry

3 credit hours

Examines the causes of cancer, the chemistry of approved anti-cancer drugs, mechanisms of interaction with the body, side effects, classifications of drugs, and environmental carginogens.

Prerequisites: CHE 212 and 212L; one year of biology.

 

CHE 456

Inorganic Chemistry

3 credit hours

Examines bonding, structure, and reactions of coordination complexes. Discusses acid-base theories, homogeneous catalysis, and heterogeneous catalysis.

Prerequisite: CHE 212 and 212L.

 

CHE 458

Chemistry Internship

1-4 credit hours

Student involvement in an industrial or academic internship that is approved, planned, and documented.

Prerequisite: CHE 400 and 400L.

 

CHE 459

Biochemistry Lecture

3 credit hours

An introductory study of biochemistry with emphasis on intermediate metabolism. Topics include protein structure and function, enzyme kinetics, the major metabolic pathways, and integration of metabolism. (Highly recommended for all those planning to take the MCAT, PCAT or DCAT.)

Prerequisite: CHE 212 and 212L.

 

CHE 459L

Biochemistry Laboratory

1 credit hour

An introduction to basic laboratory techniques for biochemistry. Topics include protein assays, protein purification, kinetics of enzyme catalyzed reactions, spectroscopy, centrifugation, dialysis, electrophoresis, and chromatography.

Prerequisites: CHE 459.

Lab fee: $100.

 

CHE 469

Biochemistry II Lecture

3 credit hours

A continuation of the concepts discussed in CHE 459.

Prerequisite: CHE 459.

 

CHE 471

Structure and Bonding

3 credit hours

A study of the fundamental basis of all chemistry—the chemical bond and molecular structure. Places emphasis on developing a modern understanding of bonding and modeling theories. Gives the student practical experience in using current molecular modeling software and its application towards solving problems of modern chemical, medical, and biochemical research and practice.

Prerequisite: CHE 303.

 

CHE 473

Medicinal Chemistry

3 credit hours

Emphasis on organic reactions and reaction mechanisms, selected heterocyclic chemistry, polymer chemistry, nucleic acid chemistry, chemistry of pesticides, drugs of use and abuse, biogenic amines, biosynthesis, and relevant mechanistic concepts.

Prerequisites: CHE 212 and 212L.

 

CHE 474

Environmental Analysis

3 credit hours

Focuses on acids, bases, chemical equilibria, electronics for scientists, and modern methods of analysis.

Prerequisite: CHE 212 and 212L.

 

CHE 499

Individual Research and Senior Paper

3 credit hours

Directed individual study in research and writing required for the senior paper.

Prerequisites: CHE 400 and 400L; CHE 449.

Restrictions: Senior standing; chemistry or biomedical chemistry major.

Lab fee: $50.

 

CHE 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

ChInese (CHI)

 

CHI 101

Elementary Chinese I

4 credit hours

A beginning course in Mandarin Chinese. Covers oral/aural work, vocabulary, grammar, and composition. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL novice mid competencies. (This course does not count toward the Bachelor of Arts language requirement or a minor in Chinese but can be used for elective credit.)

Lab fee: $40.

 

CHI 102

Elementary Chinese II

4 credit hours

Builds on the skills from CHI 101. Includes oral/aural practice and covers additional vocabulary and grammar, including various verb tenses. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL novice high competencies.

Prerequisite: CHI 101 with a grade of “C” or higher.

Lab fee: $40.

 

CHI 203

Intermediate Chinese I

3 credit hours

Continued study of Chinese with review of grammar and composition. Includes selected readings in addition to text. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL intermediate low competencies.

Prerequisite: Proficiency examination or CHI 102 with a grade of “C” or higher.

Lab fee: $40.

 

CHI 204

Intermediate Chinese II

3 credit hours

An intensive practical conversational workshop. Grammar review, vocabulary expansion, with emphasis on spoken Mandarin Chinese, both oral and aural skills. Includes presentations, videos, and additional means to promote active student participation. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL intermediate mid level competencies.

Prerequisite: CHI 203 with a grade of “C” or higher.

 

CHI 219

Travel Study

3 credit hours

A two-week trip to a Chinese-speaking country. Includes an in-depth study of history, geography, and art. Students learn everyday customs and have an opportunity to put grammar principles to practical use. (May substitute for CHI 203).

Prerequisite: CHI 102 or demonstrated proficiency.

 

CHI 301

Phonetics and Conversation

3 credit hours

Instruction in advanced conversation for proficiency with practical phonetics and drills for improvement of students’ aural-oral skills. Focuses on particular problem areas for English speakers, such as difficult vowels and consonants, correct usage of ‘liaisons,” silent e’s, intonations, rhythms, accents, and pauses. Includes speech patterns ranging from versification to slang of different degrees. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL intermediate high competencies. (Taught in Chinese.)

Prerequisite: CHI 204 or equivalent.

 

CHI 302

Literature and Composition

3 credit hours

A course to develop writing skills using applied stylistic analysis and practical compositional exercises. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL intermediate high competencies. (Taught in Chinese.)

Prerequisite: CHI 204.

 

CHI 305

Civilization and Culture

3 credit hours

A study of the historical, political, and cultural development of China with emphasis on contemporary aspects. Coves most activities listed in the ACTFL intermediate high competencies. (Taught in Chinese.)

Prerequisite: CHI 204 or equivalent.

 

CHI 306

Business Chinese

3 credit hours

A study of Chinese in its application to business, including terminaology with respect to office procedures and international marketing. (Taught primarily in Chinese.)

Prerequisite: CHI 204.

 

CHI 450

Internship

1-3 credit hours

Systematic and supervised practicum in a Mandarin-speaking community. Application of Chinese oral communication and writing skills. Credit varies, depending on time involved on-site.

Prerequisite: CHI 204.

Restriction: Permission of the department required.

Lab fee: $30.00

 

CHI 451

Special Readings

1-3 credit hours

Special readings course in Chinese to cover general or specific areas as determined by the professor to meet the need of the student.

Restrictions: Chinese minor, arrangement with professor, and departmental permission.

 

CHI 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Church Ministries (CHRM)

 

CHRM 302

Christian Leadership

3 credit hours

Provides the student with an understanding of the nature of Christian leadership and how to develop as a leader called to serve the body of Christ. Designed to help students discover how they are to live their lives in such a way that they become the Gospel in every person’s world. A guided self-study into one’s calling. Includes discussion of what it means to be called and what is Jesus’ model of leadership as well as other Biblical and modern models of leadership.

Restriction: Sophomore standing or above.

 

CHRM 304

Introduction to Christian Education

3 credit hours

A study of the basic principles and practices of organizing, administrating, and supervising a balanced program of Bible teaching ministries in the local church. Surveys all of the educational agencies for the various age levels, particularly the Sunday school. (Offered only through distance learning.)

 

CHRM 305

Teaching the Bible

3 credit hours

Practical exploration of the teaching/learning process as a foundation for Bible study and teaching all age levels in the church. Studies and demonstrates learning/teaching theory and process, objectives, lesson planning, and methodologies.

Prerequisites: BIB 222 and 261.

 

CHRM 307

Urban Outreach Ministries

3 credit hours

Examines Christ’s life as a Biblical model for ministry. His teaching and example have special relevance for those who serve the poor. A scriptural, theological, and experiential perspective for mission outreach among the world’s poor. Course study uses Biblical, theological, and contemporary practice resources.

Restriction: Sophomore standing or above.

 

CHRM 310

Youth Culture and Faith Development

3 credit hours

Seeks to develop an advanced understanding of the culture of young people and how to minister to adolescents in the throes of the physical, social, educational, and faith development issues. This course recognizes that youth ministry is cross-cultural and endeavors to consider and discover new ways to equip adolescents to live as fully functional Christian adults.

Restriction: Junior or senior standing.

 

CHRM 315

Charismatic/Pentecostal Approaches to Pastoral Caregiving

3 credit hours

Acquaints students with philosophy, methods, and resources suitable for those in professional or lay ministry, equipping students for application of knowledge and skills to a broad range of pastoral settings.

 

CHRM 317

Introduction to Youth Ministry

3 credit hours

An overview of youth ministry within the local church including foundations for ministry, roles and relationships of the youth minister, and administrative principles and strategies.

Restriction: Sophomore standing or above.

 

CHRM 335

Introduction to Evangelism

3 credit hours

Explores the Biblical, theological, ethical, and sociological foundations and implications of the Great Commission. Introduction to several presentations of the Gospel while challenging students to formulate their own Gospel presentation fit for a variety of cultural settings. Encourages students to be aware of the philosophical presuppositions that influence their personal proclamation and living out the Gospel.

Restriction: Sophomore standing or above.

 
CHRM 340

Sermon Preparation and Preaching

3 credit hours

A study of the fundamentals of preaching. Gives attention to the Biblical perspectives of preaching and the principles of sermon construction, as well as to the delivery of the sermon.

Prerequisites: BIB 222, 261, 306, and THE 217

Restriction: Junior or senior standing.

 

CHRM 351

Team Ministry

3 credit Hours

A study of the role of the vocational church staff team member as leader, teacher, trainer, supervisor, and evaluator int he local church. Also studies the tasks and relationships with the pastor, congregation, and other staff--both paid and volunteer.

 

CHRM 398

Ministry Practicum

3 credit Hours

Supervised ministry in a local church or ministry setting under the auspices of an assigned mentor. The supervised activities are ministries in areas of the student’s gifts and call as well as those meeting church needs.

Restrictions: Junior or senior standing; summer or semester just prior to writing senior paper.

 

CHRM 402

Discipleship and Small Groups

3 credit hours

A study of how to develop and direct discipleship and small group programs within the church. Includes small group principles, dynamics, and problems. Also considers the way to develop Christian disciples and gives practical guidelines for implementing discipleship in the church.

 

CHRM 430

Local Church Outreach

3 credit hours

Focuses on the practice of evangelism in the local church, exploring what it means for the church to be in missions to the unchurched.

Restrictions: Sophomore standing or above.

 

CHRM 431

Media and Technology in Ministry

3 credit hours

A broad study of the various types of mass communication media and technology and their practical use in evangelism and local church ministry. Provides the student with a set of contemporary media technology skills compatible with post-modern Christianity.

Restrictions: Sophomore standing or above.

 

CHRM 453

Pastoral Care of Families with Youth

3 credit hours

Discusses how to help families with adolescents. Addresses the family system, the characteristics of the “at risk” adolescent, and ways to guide adolescents and their families as they face such topics as divorce, sexuality, unplanned pregnancy, chemical abuse, boundaries, parental roles, single parenting, sibling relationships, respect, independence, career planning, and goal setting.

Prerequisite: CHRM 317.

Restriction: Junior or senior standing.

 

CHRM 455

Intensive Studies

3 credit hours

Investigation of selected issues in the practices of ministry. Areas of study vary so that the course may be repeated.

 

CHRM 456

Children’s Ministry

3 credit hours

Provides an overview of Christian education for children from birth through the sixth grade including age group characteristics, leadership of various ministries, spiritual development, methods, resources, and current trends.

 

CHRM 457

Honors Assistant Practicum

3 credit hours

A practicum in which the student works one-on-one with an ORU teacher to improve skills in course preparation and administration, time management, tutoring, and communication. The student has opportunities to become involved with professional teaching and/or research on the baccalaureate level in Biblical literature, theology, and church ministries.

 

CHRM 460

Church Administration

3 credit hours

Emphasizes church administration, including organization, programming, aspects of leadership, and the relationship of the church to the denomination and to society. Gives attention to various aspects of the minister’s work, including his or her schedule.

 

CHRM 499

Senior Paper/Portfolio

3 credit hours

Designed for seniors who, after completing 150 hours of church-related practicum experience, write a major paper that takes into account their practicum experiences, philosophy of ministry, and a research component that deals with a specialized area of ministry.

Prerequisites: THE 217; CHRM 398 or MISS 397.

 

CHRM 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (CIT)

 

CIT 216

Project Management

3 credit hours

Addresses the management of communication, cost, human resource, integration, procurement, quality, risk, scope, and time, as well as a project manager’s social and professional responsibilities. Covers how project management proficiency is measured in the areas of initiation, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, closing, and professional and social responsibility. Also provides an introduction/overview of project software.

 

CIT 302

Enterprise Development

3 credit hours

Addresses quality assurance, software development, methodology, and testing. Demonstrates what constitutes professional business principles and practices that encourage free enterprise and advance science and technology innovation.

Prerequisite: CSC 206.

 

CIT 304

System Analysis/Design

3 credit hours

An overview of a system’s development life cycle. Emphasizes current system documentation through the use of both classical and structured tools/designs, input and output designs, program specifications and a study of structured systems development. Emphasizes strategies and techniques of structured design for producing logical methodologies to deal with complexity in development information systems. Includes in-depth discussion of information gathering and reporting activities of transitioning from analysis to design.

Prerequisite: CSC 111.

 

CIT 306

Database Development

3 credit hours

An introduction to the concepts and techniques of structuring data on secondary storage devices. Introduces concepts and techniques encountered in database systems. Topics include data independence, data modeling techniques, data normalization, data description languages, query languages, design and implementation strategies, security, integrity, and reliability and an in-depth study of SQL. Various data storage implementations such as operational databases, data warehouses, distributed databases, Big Data, NoSQL, etc., will be explored.

Prerequisite: CSC 206.

 

CIT 314

Programming in the Linux Environment

3 credit hours

An introduction to Linux operating systems and developing application software in the Linux environment. Linux topics include general operating system functions and principles, file systems and security, text editors, file processing, shell script programming and Linux commands and utilities. Also covers working in a graphical desktop environment such as GNOME. Programming topics include functional syntax and constructs of programming languages used in the Linux environment, structured and object-oriented program design and implementation, including topics such as class design, polymorphism and inheritance. This course requires a functional knowledge of programming and is designed for individuals with previous programming experience in another object-oriented language such as Java.

Prerequisite: CSC 206.

 

CIT 352

Mobile Application Development

3 credit hours

Application software development and deployment for mobile devices. Covers both Android and IOS platforms.

Prerequisite: CSC 206.

 

CIT 428

Information Systems

3 credit hours

An introduction to planning, coordinating, directing research, and facilitating computer-related activities. Examines activities associated with installing and upgrading hardware and software, programming and systems design, development of computer networks, and implementing Internet and Intranet sites. Includes upkeep, maintenance, and security of networks. Students analyze computer and information needs of organizations from an operational and strategic perspective.

Prerequisite: CSC 111.

 

CIT 442

Information System Security

3 credit hours

An overview of information system security to include managing security, protecting information technology assets, of attacking and of guarding against attacks and failures in various types of information systems. Includes computer, network, and data protection technologies (e.g., firewalls, packet filters, proxy servers, user authentication and validation techniques, encryption, backup methodologies, and system and component redundancies. Examines various threats and attack methods (e.g., hackers, crackers, viruses, worms, sniffers, identity spoofs, hardware vulnerabilities).

Prerequisite: CSC 111.

 

CIT 450

Computer Internship

3 credit hours

An exposure to the computer information industry in which a student works within an organization to better understand the basic skills required to secure a position and advance in this industry. The student learns about the operation of different hardware and/or software components, uses and tests skills acquired in the classroom, gains confidence, and returns to campus with a better understanding of the competencies needed by a professional in the computer information industry. (Can be taken twice for credit.) (Not counted toward a minor in computer information technology.)

 

CIT 454

Special Topics in Computer Information Technology

3 credit hours

Selected topics covered in the core curriculum considered in response to student interest and need. Information technology is a rapidly evolving field and career. This course exposes students to new technologies as they are introduced into the profession. Each course will have its own specific description and objectives. (Can be taken more than once if subject matter is different).

Restriction: Permission from instructor.

 

CIT 498

Senior Paper/Project Preparation

1 credit hour

Assists students in preparing for the senior paper/project and in completing their Whole Person Assessment artifacts.

 

CIT 499

Senior Paper/Project

2 credit hours

The design, implementation, and documentation of a substantial programming project or investigation into one of the topics in the discipline of computer science.

Prerequisite: CIT 498.

 

CIT 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

COMPUTER ENGINEERING (CMPE)

 

CMPE 312

Computer Networks and Communications

3 credit hours

An introduction to the growing areas of computer networks and communications. Topics include ISDN, LANs, fiber optics, and bridges with a detailed study of OSI protocols.

Restriction: Senior standing in CMPE or EE or instructor's permission.

Course fee: $55.

 

CMPE 340

Digital Systems Design Lecture

3 credit hours

Design of combinational and sequential logic circuits. Design of practical digital circuits using PAL, PLA and FPGA. Application of VHDL in design.

Corequisite: CMPE 340L.

 

CMPE 340L

Digital Systems Design Laboratory

1 credit hour

Analysis and design of combinational and sequential digital systems. Computer simulation of digital circuits. Digital breadboarding debugging techniques, and application of software tools in design.

Corequisite: CMPE 340.

Lab fee: $55.

 

CMPE 441

Microprocessor Systems Design

3 credit hours

Introduction to Intel-8085 and ARM microprocessors, their architecture, instructions, and assembly-level language programming techniques. Interfaces Intel-8085 with peripheral devices, study, and use of Intel-8085 (ARM) cross-assembler and simulator. Incorporates lab experience in the course.

Prerequisites: CMPE 340 and 340L.

Course fee: $55.

 

CMPE 443

Computer Architecture

3 credit hours

A study of the evolution of computer architecture and the factors influencing the design of hardware and software elements of computer systems. Topics may include instruction set design, processor implementation techniques, and I/O and interrupts. Also includes advanced architectural features, pipelining, virtual memory, cache memory, and concepts of operating systems.

Prerequisite: CMPE 441.

Course fee: $35.

 

CMPE 450

Special Topics

3 credit hours

Courses of special interest. Topics vary.

Restriction: Junior or senior standing or permission from instructor.

Course fee: $55.

 

CMPE 495

Directed Study

1-3 credit hours

Directed study of problems of limited scope approved on an individual basis. May require written and/or oral presentation.

Restriction: Permission from instructor or approval of department chair.

 
CMPE 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Communication Arts (COM)

 

COM 101

Oral Communication

3 credit hours

An investigation of basic principles of communication and their application to intrapersonal, interpersonal, small group, and public communication. (Honors sections are available for this course.)

Course fee: $5.

 

COM 102

Voice, Diction, and Phonetics

3 credit hours

The study of voice production and phonetics. Topics include the purpose of vocal production, the characteristics of good speech, the identification, evaluation, and correction of improper speech techniques, and the individual analysis of and drill to correct inadequacies of vocal production and vocal variety. Involves exercises and activities to correct specific vocal problems, learning the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) to enable precise and improved articulation, and classroom transcription activities using IPA, combined with the phonetic analysis of each sound and the study of pronunciation standards.

 

COM 110

Teaching Communications Arts

0.5 - 3 credit hours

An investigation of and practice with specific methods in teaching secondary students teaching speech, drama, debate, and related subject areas. (Course is taken six times.)

 

COM 202

Oral Interpretation of Literature

3 credit hours

Analysis of prose, poetry, and drama for emotional and intellectual meaning, with reference to the author’s background, philosophy, and intent. Application of the principles of oral presentation to the interpretation and recreation of that meaning for various audiences.

 

COM 203

Interpersonal Communication

3 credit hours

A study of the theory and practice of communication skills in at least three areas: functional intelligence, social decision-making, and self-expression. Encourages a Biblical whole-life approach to communication, acknowledging the integration of body, mind, and spirit into the interpersonal experience. Gives special attention to the application of theory to life situations.

Prerequisite: COM 101.

 

COM 251

Communication Seminar

1 credit hour

A seminar including pertinent subjects, guest speakers from the organizational/interpersonal industry, demonstrations, exercises, field trips, and experiences that are outside the scope of standard organizational/interpersonal courses.

 

COM 300

Organizational Communication

3 credit hours

A study of the theory and practice of organizational communication skills including assumptions, processes, roles, relationships, and responsibilities. Addresses skills and applications of organizational communication. Focuses on the analysis of an organization of the student’s choice and on the understanding and completion of a communication needs assessment with an organization in the Tulsa area.

Prerequisite: COM 101.

 

COM 302

Advanced Public Speaking

3 credit hours

Instruction in the theory and practice of public speaking skills in a broad range of situations. Emphasis is on formulation and presentation skills and public speaking as a vehicle for the discovery and artful presentation of truth, the promotion of responsible personal development, and the encouragement of constructive social action. Each speech needs to reflect Christian principles and present ethical ways to enhance audience participation and acceptance.

Prerequisite: COM 101.

Course fee: $10.

 

COM 309

Argumentation and Persuasion: Theory and Practice

3 credit hours

An examination of reasoning skills with an emphasis on many of the fallacies used in argumentation today. Covers debate, both Lincoln/Douglas and cross examination, and expands the students’ world perspective through examination of print editorials, Sunday news programs, and pundit news programs.

Prerequisite: COM 101.

 

COM 315

Forensics, Debate and Tournament Directing

3 Credit Hours

Covers how to prepare students to teach forensics, organize a school forensics squad, and teach presentation skills at a secondary level in competitions (e.g. prose and poetry reading, oratory, extemporaneous speaking, dramatic duo, communication analysis, dramatic and humorous presentations, and readers’ theatre). Includes training for and participation in campus and intercollegiate forensics/debate activities.

Prerequisite: COM 309.

 

COM 322

Interviewing

3 credit hours

The theory and practice of developing interviewing skills appropriate to a broad range of situations. Emphasis is on the interview as a communication process, a tool for management of communication effectiveness, a means of collecting and disseminating information by means of the media, and a strategy for research.

Prerequisite: COM 101.

 

COM 342

Communication Theory

3 credit hours

A study of theories of communication, including intrapersonal, interpersonal, organizational, mass communication, nonverbal, and rhetorical. Encourages application of these theories to the present day situation so that students gain a greater understanding of all areas of communication and how each theory influences their lives.

Prerequisite: COM 101 or consent of instructor.

 

COM 400

Debate and Forensics Team

3 credit hours

Focuses on researching and creating debate plans and/or forensic scripts for intercollegiate competition. Includes extensive research in preparation for creating cross-examination debate plans, Lincoln/Douglas debate plans, extemporaneous speaking. Students also compete within the class to earn the right to represent the university in CEDA, NDA, and AFA tournaments.

 

COM 409

Gender and Family

3 credit hours

An examination of interpersonal and intrapersonal communication theories in light of current societal and historical Biblical considerations concerning gender and family relationships. Allows for an integration of theory and practicality in the communication process with special attention to the Christian responsibility of both the male and female and their roles in the family. Compares current research concerning the communication changes taking place in society today.

Prerequisite: COM 101.

 

COM 410

Conference Leadership/Event Planning

3 credit hours

A study of the theory and practice of group dynamics and the use of small groups in the processes of information-seeking and problem-solving. Includes examination of leadership styles. Students organize conferences and present seminars.

Prerequisite: COM 101.

 

COM 412

Training and Development

3 credit hours

A theoretical and practical study of various training techniques, the field of training, how training is used in industry today, and the elements that constitute successful training in the development of successful organizations.

Course fee: $10.

 

COM 425

Intercultural Communication

3 credit hours

A study of the processes involved in communicating with individuals from other cultural backgrounds. Focuses on developing, maintaining, and strengthening interpersonal relationships with people with various cultural backgrounds and using cultural knowledge to succeed in a globalized workplace.

Prerequisite: COM 101.

 

COM 444

Advanced Interpersonal Communication

3 credit hours

An examination of conflict reduction, listening, nonverbal communication, proxemics, self-disclosure, self-esteem, and other facets of interpersonal communication from a theoretical approach.

Prerequisites: COM 101 and 203.

 

COM 446

Business and Professional Speech

3 credit hours

A study of the most common communications necessary for the contemporary professional--including presentations, meetings, performance appraisals, and employment interviews. Focuses on communicating in the boardroom, staff meeting, or consultation arena. Students develop presentation skills by participating in a service-learning project through Junior Achievement of Oklahoma, and they also develop numerous self-marketing tools such as resumes, cover letters, and interviewing portfolio, and a Linked-In profile.

Prerequisites: COM 101, 300, and 302.

 

COM 498

Senior Paper Preparation

1 credit hour

Discussion and exploration of possible topics and a review of research techniques and methods.

Restrictions: Must be within three semesters of graduation; approval of instructor and departmental mentor.

 

COM 499

Research and Senior Paper/Project

2-3 credit hours

Specialized research culminating in a senior paper and/ or other approved project.

Prerequisite: COM 498.

Restrictions: Senior standing and consent of department chair.

 

COM 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

COMPOSITION (COMP)

 

COMP 099

Preparation for Composition I

3 credit hours

This course provides fundamental prescriptive grammar instruction with a communicative approach in a self-directed format. Students sharpen their skills in the following areas: punctuation, mechanics, spelling, sentence formation, and language usage. Students learn from their own mistakes, while improving their writing skills. Through the use of an online program that provides feedback, the student is provided with numerous opportunities to apply newly learned writing skills to various writing activities. The course also provides writing practice, with feedback from the instructor. (This course increases the number of hours in a degree program by three credit hours.)

Prerequisite or corequisite: READ 099 or TOEFL score of 500.

*Students must receive a “C” or higher to continue to COMP 101.

*Students can take COMP 099 up to 3 times if needed.

*This course is NOT designed to prepare students for the TOEFL exam.

 

COMP 101

Composition I

3 credit hours

Focuses on writing in response to readings in the humanities and on organization of essay writing, such as narration, description, illustration, and argumentation. Includes review of grammar and mechanics. Requires 24 hours of tutoring (two hours per week) in the Writing Center with an assigned tutor. (must receive a “C” or higher to continue in COMP 102. This course can substitute for a general education humanities course for students who qualify for COMP 101 and who have not already taken COMP 102.)

Prerequisite: SAT Verbal score 490 or lower or ACT composite score of 21 or lower.

Lab fee: $30

 

 

COMP 102

Composition II

3 credit hours

Writing based on selected readings (essay, nonfiction, poetry, and short story), summary and paraphrase, and at least five formal essays including synthesis, analysis, and critique. Emphasizes analytical thinking, critical reading, and ethical incorporation of sources. Includes a five to eight page research paper. Students participate in peer review and revisions. (This is the first of two reading and writing courses required in the general education curriculum. Honors sections are available for this course and are required for Honors Program Scholars and for students with high ACT or SAT scores.)

Prerequisite: SAT Verbal score of 500-630 on traditional version; ACT English score of 22-27; TOEFL score of at least 550 on the written exam, completion of COMP 101 with at least a “C”; or 70% on ORU placement exam (available only for students without scores or COMP 101 grades).

Prerequisite for COMP 102 Honors: SAT verbal score of at least 640 on traditional versions or ACT English score of at least 28.

 

COMP 303

Critical Reading and Writing

3 credit hours

An advanced writing course emphasizing writing skills such as analysis, synthesis, and critique. Uses representative readings from a variety of fields with an emphasis on the literary arts. Exercises include critical reading, reasoning skills, and writing in response to a variety of readings, as well as writing assignments that incorporate summary, paraphrase, quotation, practice in argument and persuasion. (This is the second of two composition and reading courses required in the general education curriculum. Honors sections are available for this course.)

Prerequisites: COMP 102 or equivalent.

Restriction: At least junior standing for spring and summer sections and senior standing for fall sections.

 

 

COMPUTER SCIENCE (CSC)

 

CSC 101

Computer Concepts

3 credit hours

A general overview of competing ideas that provides an understanding of computers, computer technology, computer hardware and software, and how computers are used to produce meaningful and useful information. (Does not count toward a major or minor in computer science.)

 

CSC 111

Introduction to Computing

3 credit hours

An introduction to the art of programming, including such concepts as data representation, algorithm design, structured programming, step-wise refinement, programming style, testing, debugging, and program documentation. An integral part of this course includes experience in the design and implementation of computer programs.

 

CSC 112

Microcomputer Applications in Business

3 credit hours

An introduction to commercially available software packages commonly used in business environments. Representative packages include word processors, spreadsheets, and data bases. Provides a foundation for computer applications encountered in upper-level business courses. (Does not count toward a major or minor in computer information technology.)

 

CSC 206

Intermediate Programming

3 credit hours

An intermediate introduction to the art of object-based programming. Includes such concepts as advanced structured and object-oriented programming structure, programming styles, testing, debugging, and documentation. Emphasizes experience in the design and implementation of advanced computer programming techniques and applications.

Prerequisite: CSC 111.

 

CSC 255

Data Structures

3 credit hours

A study of the design of structures for representing information and the design of algorithms for manipulating that information. Expertise in the design of structures is developed through consideration of abstract structures and implementation techniques and implementing various structures in specific programming languages. Develops expertise in the design of algorithms by solving problems, including searching and sorting. Programming projects throughout the course provide a synthesis experience in which the student designs data structures and algorithms to solve a given problem.

Prerequisite: CSC 206 or EGR 252 with a grade of “C” or higher.

 

CSC 341

Internet Programming

3 credit hours

Covers some topics encountered in developing applications for the Internet, including client-side and server-side technologies used in webpage development.

Prerequisite: CSC 206.

 

CSC 441

Data Communication

3 credit hours

The study of concepts of data communication, network design, and distributed information systems.

Prerequisite: CSC 111.

 

CSC 454

Special Topics in Computer Science

1-3 credit hours

Selected topics covered in the core curriculum considered in response to student interest and need. (May be repeated if subject matter is different.)

Restriction: Permission from instructor.

 

CSC 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Dance Performance (DANP)

 

DANP 100

Beginning Ballet

1-2 credit hours

A study of beginning classical ballet techniques with emphasis on developing a foundation in body alignment, vocabulary, technique, and artistry. (This class is designed for two semesters.)

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 101

Beginning Modern Dance

1-2 credit hours

A study of beginning modern dance technique with an emphasis on developing a foundation in body alignment, vocabulary, technique, and artistry. (This class is designed for two semesters.)

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 102

Beginning Related Dance Forms

1 credit hour

A study of beginning dance forms other than ballet and modern dance technique. May include tap, pointe, hip-hop, jazz, variations, pas de deux, world dance, among others. (This class is designed for two semesters.)

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 103

Ballet I

1-2 credit hours

A study of elementary classical ballet techniques with emphasis on developing a foundation in body alignment, vocabulary, technique, and artistry. (This class is designed for two semesters.)

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 104

Modern Dance I

1-2 credit hours

A study of elementary modern dance technique with an emphasis on developing a foundation in body alignment, vocabulary, technique, and artistry. (This class is designed for two semesters.)

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 105

Related Dance Forms I

1 credit hour

A study of elementary dance forms other than ballet and modern dance technique. May include tap, pointe, hip-hop, jazz, variations, pas de deux, world dance, among others. (This class is designed for two semesters.)

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 106

Dance Seminar

.5 credit hour

A seminar covering pertinent subjects outside the scope of the other dance classes. Includes exercises, experiences, and guest artists from the dance world.

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 107

Improvisation I

1 credit hour

A class of movement exploration that involves elements of movement, use of props, solo and group work, creative problem solving, and individual creation of movement.

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 108

Improvisation II

1 credit hour

Explores partnering, contact improvisation, improvisation as a creative tool for choreography, and performance improvisation.

Prerequisite: DANP 107

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 109

Dance Ensemble

0.5 credit hour

A practicum that includes concerts, festivals, workshops, and conferences both regionally and nationally. Gives credit to dancers participating in ORU’s performing dance ensemble.

Restriction: Permission of the department.

Course fee: $10.

 

DANP 125

History of Dance I

3 credit hours

A history and philosophy of dance up to the twentieth century and an introduction to dance as a career.

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 203

Ballet II

1-2 credit hours

A study of intermediate classical ballet techniques with emphasis on developing a foundation in body alignment, vocabulary, technique, and artistry. (This class is designed for two semesters.)

Prerequisite: DANP 100.

 

DANP 204

Modern Dance II

1-2 credit hours

A study of intermediate modern dance technique with an emphasis on developing a foundation in body alignment, vocabulary, technique, and artistry. (This class is designed for two semesters.)

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 205

Related Dance Forms II

1 credit hour

A study of intermediate dance forms other than ballet and modern dance technique. May include tap, pointe, hip-hop, jazz, variations, pas de deux, world dance, among others. (This class is designed for two semesters.)

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 207

Fundamentals of Choreography

2 credit hours

An introduction to the fundamentals of choreography exploring space, shape, effort, time, and design, with the creation of a solo work.

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 230

Dance for Worship

1 credit hour

Explores ways of creating and utilizing dance in a worship experience. Considers the spiritual and artistic dynamics of dance worship and its practical application in a ministry setting. (Can be taken more than once.)

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 303

Ballet III

1-2 credit hours

A study of advanced classical ballet techniques with emphasis on developing a foundation in body alignment, vocabulary, technique, and artistry. (This class is designed for two semesters.)

Prerequisite: DANP 200 or permission of the department.

 

DANP 304

Modern Dance III

1-2 credit hours

A study of advanced modern dance technique with emphasis on developing a foundation in body alignment, vocabulary, technique, and artistry. (This class is designed for two semesters.)

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 305

Related Dance Forms III

1 credit hour

A study of advanced dance forms other than ballet and modern dance technique. May include tap, pointe, hip-hop, jazz, variations, pas de deux, world dance, among others. (This class is designed for two semesters.)

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 307

Intermediate Choreography

2 credit hours

An intermediate study of choreography exploring small group composition.

Prerequisite: DANP 207 and permission of the department.

 

DANP 325

History of Dance II

3 credit hours

Combines history and philosophy of American dance, dance from the twentieth century to present day, and an introduction to dance in education.

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 403

Ballet IV

1-2 credit hours

A study of pre-professional ballet techniques with emphasis on developing a foundation in body alignment, vocabulary, technique, and artistry. (This class is designed for two semesters.)

Prerequisite: DANP 300 or permission of the department.

 

DANP 404

Modern Dance IV

1-2 credit hours

A study of pre-professional modern dance technique with emphasis on a foundation in body alignment, technique, and artistry. (This class is designed for two semesters.)

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 406

Pedagogy I: Dance Techniques for Children

2 credit hours

Focuses on dance education theories and teaching methodologies for children, using National Dance Standards for Dance Education. Includes teaching practicum.

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 407

Advanced Choreography

2 credit hours

An advanced study of choreography exploring large group composition.

Prerequisite: DANP 307.

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 420

Performing Arts Management

3 credit hours

An overview of studio management, non-profit organizations, grant and proposal writing, concert production, and touring.

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 426

Pedagogy II: Dance Techniques for Secondary Education

2 credit hours

Focuses on dance education theories and teaching methodologies for secondary school, using National Dance Standards for Dance Education. Includes teaching practicum.

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 490

Senior Performance

3 credit hours

Designed for senior dance performance majors to demonstrate their strongest areas of interest including performance, choreography, teaching, studio management, dance ministry, arts education, arts integration, or performance/tour management.

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DANP 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

DOCTOR OF MINISTRY (DMIN)

 

DMIN 711

Ministerial Identity and Personal Assessment

3 credit hours

Designed to help the student examine the role(s) of the minister, develop a profile of personal ministerial style, and articulate a description of his or her ministerial identity. Leads students into the development of personal goals for the doctor of ministry degree experience.

 

DMIN 719


Holy Spirit and Healing

3 credit hours

Guides the student in a comprehensive study of the distinctives of ORU; the Holy Spirit and Healing. Examines the theological, historical, and practical dimensions of these topics. Examines various models and contexts for healing. Assists the student in formulating and enunciating a personal theology of charismatic ministry.

DMIN 726

Theological Reflection in the Ministry Context

3  credit hours

Examines how the Bible, church history, and cultural setting inform critical reflection on ministry issues. Emphasizes the discernment of the Holy Spirit at work in and speaking through these theological components, Develops theological reflection on contemporary issues in light of these foundations. Provides structure for chapter two of the Applied Research Project.
 

DMIN 730

Missional Leadership Strategies for Today’s Church

3 credit hours

Examines the principles and dynamics of church growth for implementation in the local church. Concepts and skills are developed that undergird the ministry of the church, both pastoral and missionary, and facilitate the task of evangelism and the incorporation of believers into Christian groups.

 

DMIN 732

Leading for Ministry Effectiveness

3 credit hours

Presents a concept of servant leadership based in the Scriptures and contemporary literature. Views the leader in various roles and relationships within the context of the local church or ministry. Gives assistance in determining the student’s leadership and management styles. Stresses the integration of ministry and management.

 

DMIN 735

Communicating the Gospel

3 credit hours

Examines the role of the minister as related to preaching and teaching. Explores societal trends for the purpose of influencing strategies of preaching and teaching in order to increase relevance and effectiveness.

 

DMIN 737

Leadership Theory and Practice for the Church

3 credit hours

Guides students in the study of leadership in the Bible for application in contemporary ministry leadership contexts. Examines current leadership theories and their potential relevance for today's ministry leader. Discusses the facilitation of personal and church leadership development.

 

DMIN 738

Principles of Supervision in Pastoral Care and Chaplaincy

3 credit hours

Discusses common theologies, theories, and techniques of supervision. Uses written case studies and ethical dilemmas to engage students in developing a personal supervisory contract that can guide their own supervision and the supervision they provide to others.

 

DMIN 740

Clinical Pastoral Education

3 credit hours

An onsite clinical experience in which students work with clergy, pastoral counselors, or chaplains from various denominations. Incorporates a highly supervised process of ministering to people in clinical settings. (May be completed at any certified clinical pastoral education site with appropriate supervision.)

 

DMIN 749

Directed Study

3 credit hours

Research and writing under the supervision of a faculty member. Topics need to be related to subject matter in the academic D.Min. curriculum and approved by the professor, advisor, and academic dean.

Restriction: Approval of instructor and dean.

 

DMIN 752

Advanced Seminar in Marriage and Family Ministry

3 credit hours

Discusses the latest research in marriage and family therapy. Special emphasis is placed on responding theologically and therapeutically to specific contemporary issues such as multiple family forms, sexual orientation, caring for aging parents, and marital infidelity. Also addresses preventative care, parent education, divorce recovery, and re-marital counseling.

 

DMIN 753

Advanced Workshop for Addictive Behaviors

3 credit hours

A workshop that uses the case study method to present students with vignettes that demonstrate differing addictive disorders. Students learn to make assessments, assess risks, and guide people through the change process. Includes an orientation to the 12-step methodology.

 

DMIN 761

Pastoral Care for Spiritual Formation and Healing

3 credit hours

Acquaints students with various models of spiritual formation and strategies for facilitating that development. Special attention is given to the framework of systems theory and the concept of second order change. Creating an environment conducive for spiritual formation and recognizing growth opportunities inherent in crises is emphasized. Class material is presented within the context of a Pentecostal/charismatic theology, with a focus on the major theme of Scripture--redemption.

 

DMIN 768

Pastoral Care and Chaplaincy in the 21st Century

3 credit hours

Using case studies that depict common pastoral counseling-related situations, students discuss what makes counseling pastoral. Students identify and evaluate perspectives of humanity and how they relate to pastoral counseling. Includes theological tasks of counseling and familiarity with specific techniques that orient students to the diverse 21st century church.

 

DMIN 787

Methods of Ministry Research

3 credits hours

An opportunity for students to offer reports of progress on applied research projects to peers and supervisors. The group is encouraged to critique the proposed research design and offer suggestions for improvement. Includes additional instruction in research design, gathering and treating data, and writing the final report. Orients students to Doctor of Ministry research design in the ministry context and in the design of an appropriate applied research project.

 
DMIN 788

Tools of Ministry Research

3 credit hours

Designed to prepare the student to identify literature related to his/her research problem, to design appropriate data collection tools and to analyze the data.

 

DMIN 790

Research Project

1 credit hour

The implementation of an approved project proposal, the writing of a final report, and the oral defense before the student’s project committee.

 

DMIN 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Drama (DRAM)

 

DRAM 105

Theatre Seminar

0-0.5 credit hours

A seminar including pertinent subjects, guest speakers from the entertainment industry, demonstrations, exercises, field trips, and experiences that are outside the scope of the other drama courses offered at ORU.

 

DRAM 107

Film Acting Technique

3 credit hours

An acting experience organized as a single-camera acting workshop. Provides the students opportunity to study single camera techniques, the studio rehearsal, and filming the scene. The students gain exp,mmmmm4ekyuj3vc erience by rehearsing and acting in scenes that are videotaped.

 

DRAM 150

Drama in the Church

1 credit hour

An overview surveying current trends utilizing dramatic elements in a church setting. Includes a study of quality sketches, plays, creative dramatics, exercises, and interactive theatre. Discusses using drama in all facets of the church community.

 

DRAM 204

Playwriting

3 credit hours

Surveys the current styles and genres of short plays utilized in a church setting. Examines the basics of dramatic writing, including plot, conflict, format, characterization, and dialogue. Studies the process of developing a short play from concept to performance.

 

DRAM 205

Fundamentals of Acting

3 credit hours

Provides basic techniques and approaches to the art of acting. Covers the fundamentals of stage terminology, stage movement, and improvisation.

 

DRAM 215

Introduction to Theatre

3 credit hours

A study of the various elements and functions of theatre in society. Focuses on becoming an intelligent artistic critic and evaluating art from a Christian perspective. Provides the student with an overall introduction to the theatre arts. Includes theatre as an art form, the basic elements of a play, the role of the critic, the audience, the scene designer, the director, the customer, and the director. Places special emphasis on developing evaluative skills while watching theatre. (Crosslisted with HUM 270.)

 

DRAM 216

Introduction to Technical Production

3 credit hours

Fundamentals of scenery construction with instruction and practice in stagecraft and lighting coordinated with university theatre productions.

Course fee: $20.

 

DRAM 227

Theatre Forms

3 credit hours

A study of various theatrical forms, elements, and techniques needed to foster versatility in the theatre artist.

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

DRAM 232

Acting Styles

3 credit hours

An advanced course requiring no background in styles of acting. Covers the history, background, and various acting styles of period dramas from the Greeks through the Comedy of Manners. Students rehearse and perform the various scenes in class.

 

DRAM 233

Theatrical Lighting Design and Technology

3 credit hours

Designed to expose the student to theatrical lighting design from theory to practice and to give a broad spectrum of knowledge of available lighting technology. Provides a foundation on which a student builds a theatrical lighting design experience.

 

DRAM 301

Acting for Musical Theatre

3 credit hours

Provides basic techniques and approaches to the art of acting for musical theatre. Emphasis on using acting tools to create expression through song. Students develop skills through stage performance with a classroom audience.

 

DRAM 304

Theatre History I

3 credit hours

A study of the history of theatre from the Greeks to Ibsen. The course provides an in-depth study of the plays, playwrights, physical theatre, social structure, and theatre criticism. Surveys the social, political, religious, and theatrical aspects of the various periods to better acquaint the student with these areas and their place in the development of modern drama.

 

DRAM 305

Theatre History II

3 credit hours

A historical study of the plays, playwrights, physical theatre, and specific theatre movements that characterize theatre from 1800 to the present.

 

DRAM 306

Advanced Acting

3 credit hours

An advanced study of acting that stimulates the actor’s imagination, develops an analytical approach to creating a character, and exposes the student actor to various viewpoints on training and role preparation. Introduces the student to a method of breaking down speeches, scenes, and plays into units, sequences, and apogees. Through this comparative study, students develop their own acting techniques from a Christian perspective. Students use this practical analysis in a rehearsal and performance of an assigned final recital project.

Prerequisite: DRAM 205.

Restriction: Theatre Arts majors.

 

DRAM 336

Directing

3 credit hours

Covers the principles and theories of stage movement, blocking, casting, rehearsing, and performance. Lab work is coordinated with university theatre productions. Requires students to direct scenes for presentation to a live audience.

Prerequisites: DRAM 205, 215 and 216.

Course fee: $20.

 

DRAM 350

Radio Drama

3 credit hours

A workshop experience in radio drama in which students are exposed to both live radio drama as well as post-production experience. Provides experience in microphone use, recording, editing, and mixing with Pro-Tools audio software.

Prerequisites: DRAM 205, MMC 127 and MMC 345.

 

DRAM 403

Costume Design

3 credit hours

An introduction to the process of costume design. includes studying design elements, production organization from a design perspective, and practical historical research. Places special emphasis on applying the principles of design to improving the student’s appearance and self-image by relating these things to a relationship with God, Jesus, and the Holy Spirit.

 

DRAM 404

Theatrical Scene Design

3 credit hours

Designed to expose the student to theatrical scene design from theory to practice. Its purpose is to provide a foundation on which the student builds a theatrical design experience.

Prerequisite: DRAM 216.

 

DRAM 405

Makeup Design

3 credit hours

A study of the methods and materials utilized in stage makeup. The class utilizes “hands on” makeup projects to teach various theatrical styles. Special emphasis is on skin care and enhancing self-image as it relates to the student’s identity in Christ.

Course fee: $20.

 

DRAM 498

Senior Paper Preparation

1 credit hour

Discussion and exploration of possible topics and a review of research techniques and methods.

Restrictions: Within three semesters of graduation and approval of instructor and departmental mentor.

 

DRAM 499

Research and Senior Paper/Project

2 credit hours

Specialized research culminating in a senior paper and/or other approved project.

Prerequisite: DRAM 498

Restrictions: Senior standing and consent of department chair.

 

DRAM 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Early Childhood Education (ECE)

 

ECE 212

Foundations of Early Childhood Education and Physical Development

3 credit hours

Addresses all aspects of physical growth and development for children from birth through age 8 as well as methods for supporting this development. Covers developmentally appropriate practice, advocacy, health, safety, nutrition, playground design, and physical education.

 

ECE 250

Infant and Toddler Development

3 credit hours

A study of the physical, psychosocial, and cognitive development of children from birth through age two. Emphasizes parent and caregiver practices that promote optimal development. (Includes a 10-hour practicum.)

 

ECE 303

Symbol Development and Creativity of the Young Child

3 credit hours

Covers all aspects of symbol development and creativity including language, literacy, art, music, and drama for children from birth through age 8. Addresses special needs of the language-different child in the development of literacy. Both the research base and practical applications are addressed. (Includes 10 hours of practicum.) (This is a writing-intensive course.)

 

ECE 313

Psychosocial Development and Guidance of the Young Child

3 credit hours

Examines the social, emotional, and moral development of the young child from birth through age 8. Investigates the research base and practical application of early childhood history, ethics, techniques for supporting psychosocial development, organizing and managing the early childhood classroom, and behavior problems ranging from normal to psychopathological. Both parent and community collaboration are considered.

 

ECE 323

Cognitive Development of the Young Child

3 credit hours

A study of the basic principles of cognitive growth and development of children from birth through age 8 as well as methods for guiding cognitive development. Covers development and evaluation of curriculum, assessment principles, and specific methods and rationales for teaching math, science, and social studies. (Includes ten hours of practicum.)

 

ECE 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Electrical Engineering (EE)

 

EE 311

Network Analysis II

3 credit hours

Continuation of EGR 210. Topics covered include impulse and sinusoidal responses of second-order networks, two-port theory, design of filters, Fourier transforms and LaPlace transforms. Includes application of MATLAB.

Prerequisite: EGR 210.

Course fee: $55.

 

EE 321

Electronics I Lecture

3 credit hours

An introduction to the basic concepts underlying the analysis and design of circuits using diodes, transistors, and Field Effect Transistors. Includes bias stability of amplifiers, design of power amplifiers and power supplies, and frequency response of active circuits. (Crosslisted with PHY 321.)

Prerequisite: EGR 210.

Corequisite: EE 321L.

 

EE 321L

Electronics I Laboratory

1 credit hour

Companion lab to EE 321 Lecture. Covers measurements of the characteristics of semi-conductor devices and the analysis and design of single-stage BJT and FET amplifiers. (Crosslisted with PHY 321L.)

Corequisite: EE 321.

Lab fee: $55.

 

EE 322

Electronics II Lecture

3 credit hours

Continuation of EE 321. Topics include frequency analysis and design of amplifiers, analysis of operational amplifiers, design of operational amplifier based circuits, integrated circuits, analysis of feedback techniques, and design of active filters. Uses SPICE software.

Prerequisite: EE 321.

Corequisite: EE 322L.

 

EE 322L

Electronics II Laboratory

1 credit hour

The companion lab to EE 322 Lecture. Topics include frequency analysis and design of amplifiers, analysis of operational amplifiers, design of operational amplifier based circuits, integrated circuits, analysis of feedback techniques, and design of active filters. Uses SPICE software.

Corequisite: EE 322.

Lab fee: $55.

 

 

EE 325

Design With Standard Components

3 credit hours

An introduction to ASIC. Application of VHDL, FPGAs, and PLCs in digital systems design. A study and practice of practical design using available digital and analog components.

Prerequisites: CMPE 340, CMPE 340L and EE 321.

Course fee: $55.

 

EE 360

Electromagnetic Theory

3 credit hours

A study of electrostatics, electric and magnetic circuits and fields, electromagnetic induction, and Maxwell’s equations in differential and integral forms. (Crosslisted with PHY 331.)

Prerequisites: PHY 112 and MAT 211.

Course fee: $55.

 

EE 361

Power Systems Analysis

3 credit hours

A study of symmetrical components, per-unit representation, transmission line analysis, power transformer analysis, synchronous machine analysis, and introductory computer power flow analysis.

Prerequisites: EGR 210 and EE 311.

Course fee: $55.

 

EE 363

Electromechanical Devices

3 credit hours

An introduction to electrical machines and transformers. Direct and alternating current machines are reduced to equivalent circuits.

Prerequisite: EGR 210.

Course fee: $35.

 

EE 450

Special Topics

3 credit hours

Courses of special interest taught as needed.

Prerequisite: EGR 210 or permission from instructor.

Course fee: $35.

 

EE 462

Design of Power Systems

3 credit hours

A study of the design of power systems using extensive computer analysis. Topics include balanced and unbalanced faults, system protection, system performance, and load flow studies.

Prerequisite: EE 361.

Course fee: $35.

 

EE 495

Directed Study

1-3 credit hours

A directed study of problems of limited scope approved on an individual basis. Written and/or oral presentation may be required.

Restriction: Permission from instructor or approval of department chair.

 

EE 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

ENGINEERING (EGR)

 

EGR 100

Engineering/Physics Seminar

0 credit hour

A discussion of current topics and practical aspects of engineering and engineering physics. (Engineering and engineering physics majors are required to enroll in this course every semester.)

 

EGR 101

Introduction to Engineering

2 credit hours

An introduction to the profession of engineering. Topics include problem solving, engineering design of simple electrical and mechanical systems, introduction to the use of computers in engineering, and introduction to economics and ethics of engineering practice.

Course fee $55.

 

EGR 140

Engineering Graphics

2 credit hours

Preparation of engineering drawings using 2-D and/or 3-D computer-aided design (CAD) packages.

Course fee: $55.

 

EGR 210

Network Analysis I Lecture

3 credit hours

Designed to provide beginning engineering students with knowledge of the fundamentals and methods of analysis of electrical networks consisting of passive components (resistors, inductors, capacitors) and sources (voltage, current).

Prerequisite: PHY 112.

Corequisites: MAT 211 and EGR 210L.

 

EGR 210L

Network Analysis I Laboratory

1 credit hour

Experiments designed to demonstrate principles discussed in EGR 210 Lecture, including measurement of resistance, voltage, current, and step responses of first- and second-order networks.

Corequisite: EGR 210.

Lab fee: $55.

 

EGR 221

Mechanics I: Statics

3 credit hours

A study of statics of particles and rigid bodies; equilibrium of rigid bodies; concentrated and distributed force systems; shear and bending moment stresses in beams and other rigid bodies; force analysis of machines, frames, and trusses; force resultants using vectors in two and three dimensions; friction forces; center of gravity; moments of inertia. (Cross listed with PHY 311)

Prerequisites: PHY 111 and 111L; MAT 202.

Course fee: $55.

 

EGR 222

Mechanics II: Dynamics

3 credit hours

A study of the dynamics of particles and systems of particles; rectilinear kinematics and curvilinear motion, relative motion of two particles, Newton’s laws of motion; work and energy; impulse and momentum; planar kinematics and kinetics of a rigid body; and vibrations. (Cross listed with PHY 312.)

Prerequisite: EGR 221.

Course fee: $35.

 

EGR 225

Circuits and Electronics Lecture

3 credit hours

An introduction to the analysis of electric and electronic circuits. Topics include resistive circuit analysis, transients of capacitive and inductive circuits, steady-state sinusoidal analysis, electronic devices and applications such as diodes, field-effect transistors, bipolar junction transistors, operational amplifiers and ac machines.

Prerequisite: PHY 112 and PHY 112L.

Corequisites: EGR 225L and MAT 211.

Restrictions: Engineering majors with a mechanical engineering concentration.

 

EGR 225L

Circuits and Electronics Lab

1 credit hour

Experiments designed to demonstrate and verify the principles discussed in the lecture component of the course as well as basic electric measurement skills. Topics include measurement of resistance, voltage, current, step responses of first-order and second-order RC and RL circuits, sinusoidal AC circuits, FET and BJT circuits, stepper motor control, etc.

Corequisite: EGR 225.

Course fee: $55.

 

EGR 231

Heat and Thermodynamics

3 credit hours

A course in thermodynamics, including first and second law, thermometry, kinetic theory, thermodynamic property relations, ideal gas mixtures, and elementary power and refrigeration cycle analyses. Includes lab experiments. (Cross listed with PHY 302.)

Prerequisites: PHY 111 and 111L and MAT 202.

Course fee: $55.

 

EGR 252

Engineering Computational Methods

3 credit hours

This course will teach the programming skills needed for basic problem solving using MATLAB programming language. The course consists of a sequence of programming assignments that require students to write computer programs to solve engineering problems. All of the assignments and the project will be written in MATLAB.

Prerequisite or corequisite: MAT 201.

Course fee: $55.

 

EGR 330

Control Systems

3 credit hours

Analysis and design of first-and second-order linear feedback control systems. Presents both classical and modern techniques. Topics discussed include LaPlace transforms, transfer functions, Bode, Nyquist, and root-locus methods, signal flow diagrams, state equations, and stability.

Prerequisites: EGR 210 or EGR 225 and MAT 211.

Course fee: $55.

 

EGR 331

Design of Control Systems

3 credit hours

An introduction to the design of automatic control systems, including classical control systems, robust control systems, state-variable feedback systems, and digital control systems. A mini design project is required for each topic, based on the theories learned in the lecture.

Prerequisite: EGR 330.

Course fee: $55.

 

EGR 461

Engineering Management and Economy

2 credit hours

A study of the management of engineering projects and a consideration of investments and economic analysis as applied to engineering.

Restriction: Junior or Senior standing.

Course fee: $35.

 

EGR 498

Senior Design and Research I

2 credit hours

First part of a two-semester, project-oriented course. Topics include research techniques, time management, patent searches, and manufacturing. Oral and written presentations are required at various stages. Student teams apply the design process by developing a project from research and proposal through construction and testing. (Cross listed with PHY 498.)

Prerequisite: For electrical concentration, EE 322; for computer concentration, CMPE 441; for mechanical concentration, ME 321 and 444. Full admission to the engineering/physics program and at least 50 credit hours in the major and cognate, or permission from the instructor.

Restriction: Senior standing.

Course fee: $55.

 

EGR 499

Senior Design and Research II

2 credit hours

A continuation of EGR 498. Student teams apply the design process by developing a project through construction and testing. Requires oral presentations and a written report. (Cross listed with PHY 499.)

Prerequisite: EGR 498.

Course fee: $55.

 

EGR 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Elementary Education (ELE)

 

ELE 314

Reading and Language Arts

3-4 credit hours

A study of the scope and sequence of skill development in language arts (listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and visually representing for students in grades 1-6). Emphasizes the interrelationship of language arts with the entire elementary curriculum, thus using an integrated teaching approach. Includes a 10-hours practicum.

 

ELE 323

Children’s Literature and the Library

3 credit hours

Acquaints the student with outstanding authors and illustrators of the best literature for children, with emphasis on meeting emotional, intellectual, and aesthetic needs. Includes library use.

 

ELE 344

Elementary Reading Methods

4 credit hours

A study of the major approaches to reading instruction in elementary grades 1 through 8. Presents methods and materials as a means of developing the student’s awareness of the reading process. The practicum component provides an opportunity to observe a reading/language arts instruction in an elementary classroom. Includes a 30-hour practicum.

Prerequisite: ELE 314.

 

ELE 403

Literacy Assessment with Clinical Experience

3 credit hours

Includes interpretation of tests and data, placement of individuals, and the diagnosis and assessment of reading disabilities. Addresses the development of case reports, including recommendations and remediation; corrective and remedial instruction utilizing appropriate materials and methods for individuals having reading problems; and instruction designed to accommodate student needs through special techniques and adaptations of instructional materials. Includes a 15-hour practicum.

Prerequisite: ELE 344.

Pre- or corequisite: ELE 314.

 

ELE 490

Research in Elementary Education

1-3 credit hours

A course designed to provide the student with an opportunity to select readings in education that pertain to the degree program. Special activities and/or projects may be suggested by the professor.

 

ELE 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

English Language Learner (ell)


ELL 304

Structure of Modern English

3 credit hours

A study of the structure of modern English through the analysis of conventional grammar and usage. Focuses on verbs and the form and function of words, phrases, and clauses. Compares and contrasts sentence structure and language variation from both descriptive and prescriptive viewpoints. Uses a linguistics approach to the analysis and structure of English. (Honors section is available.) (Cross listed with WRT 304.)

 

ELL 315

Descriptive Linguistics

3 credit hours

A general introduction to the field of descriptive linguistics, including phonetics, morphology, and syntax, especially as they relate to the second language teacher. Includes a 10-hours practicum.

 

ELL 343

TESL Methods and Materials

3 credit hours

A survey and production of TESL techniques and teaching materials. Students receive training in presentation procedures used to teach ESL effectively.

 

ELL 353

TESL Curriculum Design

3 credit hours

An overview of the field of instructional design and curriculum development with a special emphasis on curriculum for English language learners.

 

ELL 393

TESL Assessment

3 credit hours

An examination of the principles of testing and evaluation as applied to the acquisition of English as a second language. Emphasizes testing skills needed by the classroom teacher. Also covers the principles, procedures, and basic terminology of educational research to aid the classroom teacher in the interpretation of research. Includes a 15-hour practicum.

 

ELL 413

Cross-Cultural Communication

3 credit hours

An overview of the field of cross-cultural communication, including theories and models, major concepts, terminology, and current research. Also emphasizes effective interpersonal communication and teaching in the multicultural classroom. 

 

ELL 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

ENGLISH (ENG)

 

ENG 201

Introduction to Literature

3 credit hours

An introductory course designed for English and writing majors, emphasizing analysis skills and techniques for writing about literature. Uses representative readings from fiction, poetry, and drama, with an emphasis on the elements of literature. Includes reading from various genres, exploring critical approaches, and writing analytical and evaluative essays.

Prerequisite: COMP 102.

 

ENG 307

Culture and the Christian Imagination

3 credit hours

An interdisciplinary study in theology and the arts. Explores various Christian approaches to art and aesthetics. Readings and course projects are designed to help students develop critical thinking and writing skills by studying various art forms, specifically the visual arts, literature, music, and film. Fosters a Christ-centered approach to the arts and a mature understanding of how Christian doctrines (e.g., creation, the Fall, Incarnation, and stewardship) are relevant to understanding the arts, how the modern Church can express its deepest truths through art, and how the arts, in general, can be ways of experiencing God and life more fully.

 

ENG 309

Young Adult Literature

3 credit hours

Explores literature for and about the young adult. Includes critical study and evaluation of the genre, examination of the themes found in the literature, examination of authors and award-winning books found in the literature, and the selection of the literature for use in school programs.

 

ENG 310

World Literature

3 credit hours

A study of selected authors, themes, and trends representing literature outside the American and British realms. Emphasizes modern literatures of Continental Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

 

ENG 311

British Literature I

3 credit hours

A survey of major authors and works of English literature from Old English to the Romantic period (1798).

 

ENG 312

British Literature II

3 credit hours

A survey of major authors and works of English literature from the Romantic period (1798) to the present.

 

ENG 317

Multicultural Literature

3 credit hours

Explores American Literature as written by American authors of four cultural groups: African-American, Latin-American, Asian-American, and Native American. Genres include narratives, poetry, short stories, essays, dramas, and a novel.

 

ENG 323

American Literature I

3 credit hours

A survey of the major authors and works of American literature from the Puritan period to the mid-nineteenth century.

 

ENG 324

American Literature II

3 credit hours

A survey of the major authors and works of American literature from the mid-nineteenth century to the present.

 

ENG 351

Shakespeare

3 credit hours

A study of Shakespeare’s comedies, histories, and tragedies, with attention given to the development of the drama, the intellectual history of the Renaissance, and modern literary criticism.

 

ENG 352

Major Writers

3 credit hours

A study of major writers in the English language. The focus of the course varies from semester to semester, but each involves an in-depth study of a major author, such as John Milton, C.S. Lewis, D.H. Lawrence, and J.R.R. Tolkien. (May be taken twice for credit.)

 

ENG 359

English Medieval Period: 650-1500

3 credit hours

A survey of English literature during the Middle Ages, including both poetry and prose. Special emphasis is on the Medieval mystics and Arthurian romance.

 

ENG 370

American Romantic Period

3 credit hours

A study of representative authors of the Romantic Period in American literature (1820-1865). Focuses on the complex social, cultural, and political forces at work in these writings and in the Romantic movement in general, especially the influences of the earlier Romantic period in English literature (1798-1832).

 

ENG 420

English Romantic Period: 1798-1832

3 credit hours

A study of the lives, characteristics, and works of writers in the English Romantic Period. Discusses how the writings of this period influenced the Victorian writers.

 

ENG 421

English Victorian Period

3 credit hours

A survey of English literature during the Victorian Period, including both poetry and prose. Special emphasis is placed on the PreRaphaelite movement as well as the intertextual framework that existed between art and literature.

 

ENG 436

Modern American Fiction

3 credit hours

A study of American literature with emphasis on American fiction from the last half of the 20th century.

 

ENG 440

The Modern Period

3 credit hours

A study of representative authors of the Modern Period in Irish, British, and American literature (1914-1950). Includes Modernism as an international artistic movement that followed the Romantic and Realist movements.

 

ENG 450

Literary Criticism

3 credit hours

A study of the history of literary criticism and the important modern critical approaches and theories. Focuses on written exercises of the type expected of literary students, scholars, and critics.

 

ENG 451

Seminar

3 credit hours

A seminar examining aspects of literature, such as a genre or literary movement not covered in other English courses. Includes class discussion, research, and the presentation of papers. Examples of seminar subjects include early Christian literature, science fiction and fantasy, wilderness writings, minority literature, and women’s literature. (May be taken twice for credit.)

 

ENG 470

Teaching English

3 credit hours

A course designed to prepare English majors with ideas and practical knowledge for the secondary level (middle and senior high school levels) English classroom. Focuses on methods of teaching literature, composition, grammar and related subjects to current American students of varied backgrounds. (Includes 10 hour practicum).

 

ENG 498

Senior Paper Research

1 credit hour

The first of a two-course sequence designed to provide English and modern language majors with an opportunity to do specialized research in literature, language or their language of study. Includes instruction in research and bibliographical procedures and prepares students for writing of the senior research paper.

Restriction: Junior or senior standing in the English and Modern Languages Department.

 

ENG 499

Senior Paper Composition

2 credit hours

The second of a two-course senior paper sequence. The course culminates in the presentation of an in-depth research paper written for an academic audience.

Prerequisite: LANG 498.

Restriction: Senior standing.

 

ENG 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Entrepreneurship (ent)

 

ENT 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Environmental Science (EVR)

 

EVR 201

Global Development and Sustainability

3 credit hours

A survey of various global systems threatened by human misuse and contamination. Presents strategies and tools used to prevent or reduce pollution with the goal of protecting vulnerable culture groups and restoring damage ecosystems.

 

EVR 250

Environmental Science I Lecture

3 credit hours

A study of the physical and chemical factors that control the extent of contamination of Earth’s physical environment. Emphasizes soil, water, and air pollution and the chemical cycles that govern movement of pollutants from one environmental sector to another.

Prerequisite: One of the following: PSC 101, PSC 201, BIO 101, or CHE 101.

Corequisite: EVR 250 Laboratory.

 

EVR 250L

Environmental Science I Laboratory

1 credit hour

Demonstrates the practical and technical aspects of data acquisition for environmental analysis.

Corequisite: EVR 250.

Lab fee: $55.

 
EVR 251

Environmental Science II Lecture

3 credit hours

An interdisciplinary study of the biological, physical and chemical components of the environment and the effects on organisms. This second environmental science course will examine additional environmental topics not included in the first environmental science course. Similar themes will be examining environmental effects caused by humans and our role in conserving and protecting natural systems.

Corequisite: EVR 251L.

 

EVR 251L

Environmental Science II Laboratory

1 credit hour

Demonstrates the practical importance of understanding environmental science to every person, all majors, all careers at ORU and around the world.

Corequisite: EVR 251.

Lab fee: $55.

 

EVR 360

Readings in Environmental Science

1 credit hour

Directed readings and reports on topics of special interest to the student and approved by the instructor.

Restrictions: GES major and permission of the instructor.

 

EVR 380

Environmental Sustainability Internship

3 credit hours

On-the-job experience working with an agency, company, or non-governmental organization that practices environmental sustainability with the goal of being introduced to specialized techniques as well as work ethic and communication skills appropriate to a job in the environmental field.

Prerequisite: EVR 350.

Restriction: Junior standing.

 

EVR 390

Environmental Research

1 credit hour

Introduces junior environmental sustainability majors to scientific research and teaches the distinction between a “library” and “experimental” research project of experience. Students select a research topic, a research director, and an advisor for the senior research project or internship experience.

 

EVR 451

Environmental Seminar

1 credit hour

Provides an opportunity for seniors to make a professional presentation of their senior project. Each presentation is evaluated by student, peers, and faculty. Includes an assessment of overall biological knowledge by requiring the standardized ETS Biology Field Test. (Cross listed with BIO 451.)

Restrictions: GES major and senior standing.

Test fee: $30.

 

EVR 499

Senior Paper

3 credit hours

Research evaluating existing programs or concepts culminating in a senior paper that relates the topics of the chosen minors to an aspect of environmental sustainability.

Prerequisite: EVR 380.

Restriction: Senior status.

 

EVR 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

FIELD EDUCATION (FED)

 

FED 501

Teaching Methodology

0 credit hour

Prepares graduate fellows who serve as teaching assistants (TAs) in undergraduate theology classes to minister spiritually as well as academically to students in their discussion classes.

 

FED 672

Field Education (Church)

1.5 credit hours

A course enabling the student to integrate and employ Biblical/theological principles, practices of ministry, and charismatic empowerment in diverse contexts of supervised ministry in the local institutional church and in consultation-reflection groups in order to achieve competency in functioning as an effective minister of the Gospel.

Prerequisites: PRM 673 and 50% of degree program hours.

Course fees: Background check, $25.50; liability insurance, $15.

 

FED 673

Field Education (Community)

1.5 credit hours

Supervised experiences of ministry beyond the congregation of the local institutional church. Such ministries may be sponsored by a local church, parachurch organization, or community social agency. The student also integrates and employs Biblical/theological principles, practices of ministry, and charismatic empowerment in community settings and in consultation-reflection groups.

Prerequisites: PRM 673 and 50% of degree program hours.

Course fees: Background check, $25.50; liability insurance, $15.

 

FED 750

Ministry Practicum

3 credit hours

Provides the senior master of arts (in practical theology) student with practical experience in ministerial responsibilities and in a broad range of roles performed by the professional minister. Trainees gain competence in essential areas of local church ministry.

Prerequisites: PRM 673, 50% of degree program hours, and M.A. candidate in Practical Theology.

Course fees: Background check$25.50; liability insurance, $15.

 

FED 755

Teaching Ministries Practicum

3 credit hours

A practicum experience in teaching ministry and administration under the supervision of a professional educator or ministry leader. Students select practicum sites for approval by the professor.

Restriction: Completion of 50% of coursework for the teaching ministries concentration.

Course fees: Background check $25.50; liability insurance $15.

 

FED 760

Urban Ministry Practicum

3 credit hours

Provides a supervised urban ministry experience in local church and parachurch organizations in cities, small towns, or rural settings. Provides opportunities to develop practical, organizational, and leadership skills through the administration and implementation of urban programs.

Prerequisite: Completion of 50% of coursework for the urban ministry concentration.

Course fees: Background check $25.50; liability insurance $15.

 

FED 780

Pastoral Care and Chaplaincy Practicum

3 credit hours

A supervised ministry experience that teaches practical skills for ministry leadership and specialized skills for the various roles of a chaplain to serve in institutional or organizational contexts. Also helps students develop an understanding of their personal ministry gifts with appropriate support and evaluation.

Prerequisites: PRM 673 and completion of the field education requirements.

Course fees: Background check, $25.50; liability insurance, $15.

 

FED 781

Pastoral Internship

3 credit hours

Supervised ministry in a local church setting to provide opportunity for development of understanding of personal ministry gifts with appropriate support and evaluation.

Prerequisite: PRM 673 and completion of the field education requirements.

Course fees: Background check$25.50; liability insurance, $15.

 

FED 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

FINANCE (FIN)

 

FIN 244

Personal Financial Planning

3 credit hours

Focuses on the key concepts, tools, and techniques of contemporary personal finance. Financial problems are addressed in the context as a result of the lack of management rather than lack of money. Topics discussed to avoid financial problems include the time value of money, the importance of saving, how to establish good credit and a high credit score, the correct use of credit, the use of credit cards, the establishment of financial goals, how to reduce the costs of automobile and life insurance, purchase of an automobile, and rent versus purchase of a house. (Cross listed with GBUS 556.)

 

FIN 303

Money and Banking Finance

3 credit hours

A study of money and its functions, institutional banking, central banking, and the operational aspects of monetary policy. Also covers the definition and function of money in coordinating monetary policy; financial institutions, financial markets, and interest rates; the banking industry and its regulation; central banking and the functions of the Federal Reserve in conducting monetary policy; and the globalization of financial markets and institutions.

Prerequisites: BUS 201 and 202.

 

FIN 338

Financial Management

3 credit hours

A study of the basic principles and theories of business finance including the tax environment, cash-flow analysis, working capital management, effects of financial and operational leverage, capital budgeting, cost of capital analysis, investment banking, mergers, acquisitions, reorganizations, and liquidations.

Prerequisites: ACT 216, BUS 202, and MAT 232.

 

FIN 418

Investments

3 credit hours

Designed to serve investors who are or will be actively developing and monitoring their own investment portfolios. Includes techniques, vehicles, and strategies for implementing investment goals in a portfolio context and in light of risk-return trade-offs. Includes an overview of personal finance and investments and specific investment topics such as common stocks, mutual funds, commodities, and real estate. Emphasizes using Value Line Investment Survey to evaluate common stocks and Morningstar’s Mutual Fund Value to evaluate mutual funds.

Restriction: Junior or senior status.

 

FIN 428

Bank Management

3 credit hours

A study of various aspects of managing a commercial bank, covering topics of interest for potential bank investors, borrowers, and lenders. (Cross listed with GFIN 550.)

Prerequisite: FIN 338.

 

FIN 438

Advanced Financial Management

3 credit hours

A study of the acquisition and allocation of long-term sources of funds, emphasizing problems of measuring and influencing the cost of capital and the administration of fund-raising for nonfinancial corporations. Includes an examination of techniques to correctly consider cash-flow changes resulting from applications of long-term funds along with the effects of alternative investment decision rules. (Cross listed with GFIN 550.)

Prerequisite: FIN 338.

 

FIN 451

Finance Internship

1-3 credit hours

A special problem in finance for the student of special ability in lieu of a regular course. It is also possible, upon receiving written approval from the instructor, to obtain an on-the-job apprenticeship for one semester to provide data for writing a formal paper. (Credit received is determined by the nature and scope of the project.)

Restriction: Finance majors only.

 

FIN 452

Corporate Financial Decision Making

3 credit hours

An application of the principles learned in the basic financial management course to real-world problems. The case study method is used. Students learn to develop skills in analyzing problems and recommending solutions. Students make presentations of their recommended solutions individually and as part of a team.

Prerequisite: FIN 338.

 

FIN 460

International Financial Management

3 credit hours

Financial analysis and decision-making considerations of multinational corporations. Emphasis is on developing a conceptual understanding of the environmental factors that affect the decisions of financial managers in a global context. (Cross listed with GINB 560).

Prerequisite: FIN 338 with a grade of “C” or better.

 

FIN 461

Capital Markets

3 credit hours

An introduction to the methods of securing growth financing through domestic and global private capital markets. (Cross listed with GFIN 561.)

Prerequisite: FIN 338.

 

FIN 472

Principles of Estate Planning

3 credit hours

An overview of estate planning in light of the federal transfer tax system including federal gift taxation, federal and state estate taxation, and federal generation-skipping transfer taxation. Examines various forms of property ownership and introduces various tools and planning strategies that minimize the cost, fees, taxes, and time delays associated with the transfers of those various ownerships and the related tax implications. (Cross listed with GFIN 572.)

 

FIN 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

FRENCH (FRE)

 

FRE 101

Elementary French I

4 credit hours

A beginning course in French. Covers grammar and composition, but emphasizes oral/aural skills. Includes possessives, commands, present indicative, passe compose, and futur proche. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL novice mid competencies. (This course does not count toward the bachelor of arts language requirement, a minor, or major, but can be used for elective credit.)

Lab fee: $40.

 

FRE 102

Elementary French II

4 credit hours

Builds on the skills learned in FRE 101. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL novice high competencies.

Prerequisite: FRE 101 with a grade of “C” or higher or demonstrated proficiency.

Lab fee: $40.

 

FRE 203

Intermediate French I

3 credit hours

Continued study of French with review of grammar and composition. Focuses on improving aural/oral skills. Includes selected readings in addition to text. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL intermediate mid competencies.(Honors sections available.)

Prerequisite: Proficiency examination or FRE 102 with a grade of “C” or higher.

Lab fee: $40.

 

FRE 204

Intermediate French II

3 credit hours

An intensive practical conversational workshop. Grammar review with emphasis on spoken French. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL intermediate high competencies.

Prerequisite: FRE 203 with a grade of “C” or higher.

 

FRE 219

Travel Study

3 credit hours

A two-week trip to a French-speaking country. Includes an in-depth study of French history, geography, and art as students learn everyday customs and put grammar principles to practical use. (May substitute for FRE 203 for general education requirements or for an upper level French course for students majoring or minoring in French.)

Prerequisite: FRE 102 or demonstrated proficiency.

 

FRE 301

French Phonetics and Conversation

3 credit hours

Instruction in advanced conversation for proficiency with practical phonetics and drills for improvement of students’ aural/oral skills. Focuses on particular problem areas for English speakers. (Taught in French.)

Prerequisite: FRE 204 or equivalent.

 

FRE 302

French Composition

3 credit hours

A course to develop writing skills using applied stylistic analysis and practical compositional exercises. (Taught in French.)

Prerequisite: FRE 204 or equivalent.

 

FRE 303

Survey of French Literature I

3 credit hours

A study of the beginnings of French literature and its development up to the time of the French Revolution. (Taught in French.)

Prerequisite: FRE 204 or equivalent.

 

FRE 304

Survey of French Literature II

3 credit hours

A study of the development of French literature following the Revolutionary period. (Taught in French.)

Prerequisite: FRE 204 or equivalent.

 

FRE 305

French Civilization and Culture

3 credit hours

A study of the historical, political, and cultural development of France with emphasis on contemporary aspects. (Taught in French.)

Prerequisite: FRE 204 or equivalent.

 

FRE 306

Business French

3 credit hours

A study of French in its application to business, including terminology with respect to office procedures and international marketing. (Taught primarily in French.)

Prerequisite: FRE 204.

 

FRE 430

French Literary Periods

3 credit hours

A study of French literary periods such as the Romantic, the eighteenth century, and the modern period. Focus of the course varies from semester to semester, but each involves an in-depth study of a particular literary period. Authors may include Montesquieu, Rousseau, Voltaire, Hugo, Chateau-briand, and Balzac. (Taught in French.) (May be taken more than once.)

Prerequisite: FRE 303 or 304.

 

FRE 433

French Literary Genres

3 credit hours

A study of French literary genres against a philosophical and socio-political background. Focuses on a specific genre such as short story, novel, poetry, or drama by studying authors such as Voltaire, Flaubert, and Hugo. (Taught in French.) (May be taken twice for credit.)

Prerequisite: FRE 303 or 304.

 

FRE 450

Internship

1-3 credit hours

Systematic and supervised practicum in a French-speaking community. Application of French oral communication and writing skills. Credit varies, depending on time involved on-site.

Prerequisite: FRE 204.

Restrction: Permission of the department.

 

FRE 451

Special Readings

1-3 credit hours

Special readings course in French to cover general or specific areas as determined by the professor to meet the need of the student.

Restrictions: French major, arrangement with professor, and departmental permission.

 

FRE 470

Teaching Language

3 credit hour

A course designed to provide foreign language majors with concepts needed for language learning and instruction. Includes the historical background of the teaching of modern language. Discusses Foreign Language in the Elementary School (FLES), immersion programs, and issues concerning high school programs. (Cross listed with GER 457 and SPA 457.)

 

FRE 499

Senior Paper

3 credit hours

Directed individual study for seniors pursuing research and the writing of the required senior paper.

Corequisite: French literature course.

 

FRE 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

GRADUATE ACCOUNTING (GACT)

 

GACT 500

Internship

1-3 credit hours

A practicum in which the student works one-on-one with an employer to make recommendations for improvement in the work force. The student’s work includes both a closely supervised environment and projects of personal initiative.

Prerequisite: A minimum of 12 hours of leveling and/or graduate courses.

 

GACT 527

Intermediate Accounting I

3 credit hours

A comprehensive study of intermediate accounting theory and technique. Emphasizes financial statement relationships with a balance sheet approach to the study. The course moves from the most current and liquid categories to the least current along balance-sheet lines covering all of the major balance sheet classifications and account groupings individually and in depth. The first in a two-course sequence, it covers roughly one-half of the comprehensive intermediate accounting volumes. (Cross listed with ACT 327.)

Prerequisite: ACT 216.

 

GACT 528

Intermediate Accounting II

3 credit hours

A continuation of the study of intermediate theory, which includes proper coverage of any official pronouncements of the FASB or other official bodies of the AICPA. Includes the balance sheet approach to the systematic study of the theory as well as the analysis of financial statements. (Cross listed with ACT 328.)

Prerequisite: GACT 527.

 

GACT 532

Advanced Accounting I

3 credit hours

An in-depth study of business combinations, consolidated financial statements, and accounting for partnership creation, operation, dissolution, and liquidation. Emphasizes worksheet techniques for the preparation of consolidated statements. (Cross listed with ACT 462.)

Prerequisite: ACT 328 or GACT 528.

 

GACT 533

Managerial Cost Accounting

3 credit hours

A study of basic cost relationships, cost systems design, variance analysis, CVP analysis, and standard costing techniques. Considers the relative income effects of alternative product-costing methods together with relevant cost evaluations and inventory planning and control techniques. (Cross listed with ACT 432.)

Prerequisite: ACT 216.

 

GACT 539

Auditing

3 credit hours

A course designed to acquaint the student with the theoretical knowledge to successfully perform the attest function. Although practical knowledge is best acquired while working with actual records, problems and case studies are used extensively to give practical exposure to the student. (Cross listed with GACT 539.)

Prerequisite: ACT 328.

 

GACT 542

Federal Income Tax Accounting

3 credit hours

A study of personal federal income tax accounting designed primarily to acquaint the student with both an exhaustive study of personal income tax and a brief explanation of the basic differences between the personal income tax regulations and the corporate income tax regulations. (Cross listed with ACT 442.)

Prerequisite: ACT 216.

 

GACT 543

Advanced Income Tax Accounting

3 credit hours

Continued study of the Internal Revenue Code and regulations considering advanced aspects of income, deductions, exclusions, and credits as they relate to partnerships, corporations, LLCs, and LLPs. The course includes problems that require research utilizing return preparation software and various tax reference services.(Cross listed with ACT 443)

Prerequisite: GACT 542.

 

GACT 562

Managerial Accounting

3 credit hours

A focus on the reporting, planning, and control of business activity. The student learns to analyze the effects of various decisions on external financial statements, develop and use a managerial accounting system that provides the foundation for responsibility accounting. Emphasizes developing computer spreadsheets to analyze the financial impact of management decisions.

Prerequisite: ACT 216.

 

GACT 563

Advanced Accounting II

3 credit hours

Completes the study of financial accounting theory begun in GACT 532. Covers various topics with primary emphasis on not-for-profit accounting (for government, universities, hospitals, and voluntary organizations), fiduciary accounting (for estates, trusts, and insolvent companies), and advanced financial statement presentations (interim reporting, foreign currency transactions, financial statements, segment reporting, and accounting for derivatives). (Cross listed with ACT 463.)

Prerequisites: ACT 327 or GACT 527; ACT 328 or GACT 528 is recommended, but not required.

 

GACT 570

Accounting Information Systems

3 credit hours

Examines accounting information systems as an integrated framework within a business entity. Highlighted topics include data retrieval for report preparation, evaluation of accounting information systems, and the design of charts of accounts. Discusses the role of accounting systems, controls, and auditing. (Cross listed with ACT 435.)

Prerequisite: ACT 216.

 

GACT 571

Estate and Gift Taxation

3 credit hours

A broad overview of the federal transfer tax system including federal gift taxation, federal and state estate taxation, and federal generation-skipping transfer taxation. The course examines various forms of property ownership, transfers of those various ownerships, and related tax implications. (Cross listed with ACT 471.)

Prerequisites: ACT 215, 216, and 327 with grades of "C" or better.

 

GACT 574

Tax Seminar

3 credit hours

A tax seminar focused on various contemporary federal taxation, tax planning opportunities, and tax compliance issues. (Cross listed with ACT 474.)

Prerequisite: ACT 216.

 

GACT 580

Nonprofit Accounting and Finance

3 credit hours

An overview of accounting and finance concepts as they pertain to nonprofit organizations. Emphasizes the balance sheet, cash flow statement, and accounting and finance systems for non-financial managers, administrators, and employees of nonprofit organizations. Special consideration is given to managerial skills required to sustain and enhance the performance of nonprofit organizations through the accounting and finance process of reporting, compliance, research, analysis, interpretation, and application. (Cross listed with ACT 380.)

 

GACT 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Graduate Administration (GADM)

 

GADM 600

Introduction to Doctoral Level Writing

3 credit hours

This course will provide students with an overview of the techniques necessary for graduate-level written analysis, with a goal of preparing for the dissertation process. This course will include an emphasis on the importance and necessity of grammatical and mechanical correctness,  APA documentation (only as needed), appropriate language, expression, transitions, paragraph development, and logical organization.

 
GADM 700

Leadership Studies

3 credit hours

A study of the theories, nature, styles, and skills of leadership, utilizing historic and contemporary models and emphasizing moral roots of responsible leadership. Stresses those leadership techniques and strategic decisions involved in leading, managing, and transforming organizations.

 

GADM 701

Contemporary Curriculum Issues

3 credit hours

An integrated study of the critical social, political, and economic issues confronting contemporary educational leaders. Emphasizes the impact of these issues on current and evolving curricular theories and practices in public and private schools.

 

GADM 703

Comparative Education

3 credit hours

A study of the role of history and culture in the development of educational systems within major countries and regions of the world. Emphasizes the comparison of those systems and their achievements to that of education in the United States.

 

GADM 710

Issues in Higher Education

3 credit hours

This course examines current issues in higher education domestically and globally.  It provides candidates the opportunity to gain an understanding of the current issues challenging stakeholders in higher education from a Christian worldview. 

 

GADM 800

Organizational Theory in Administration

3 credit hours

An examination of the nature and behavior of organizations and personnel. Reviews and applies various concepts and theoretical frameworks underlying the administration of organization to the educational setting.

Prerequisites: Admission to graduate education and superintendent certification program or Ed.D. program and permission of instructor.

 

GADM 805

The Superintendency

3 credit hours

An integration of theory and practice related to the roles and responsibilities of the superintendent. Emphasizes obtaining knowledge and developing skills to effectively perform the general requirements of the superintendency.

 

GADM 810

Strategies for Educational Change

3 credit hours

An overview and analysis of the change process in education with emphasis on various strategies for planning and implementing change within educational organizations.

 

GADM 820

Superintendent’s Role in Personnel

Management and Evaluation

3 credit hours

An exploration and evaluation of the relationships between administrators and other school personnel with an emphasis on the management of human resources in the educational setting. Reviews the processes, procedures, and techniques necessary for an effective personnel management program.

 

GADM 830

Business Management Practices in

Education

3 credit hours

An assessment of all aspects of the fiscal and resource management concepts and techniques used in the operation of educational organizations. Emphasizes the development of knowledge and skills in several areas including budgeting, purchasing, accounting, maintenance, and operations.

 

GADM 835

Resource Development

3 credit hours

An extensive review of concepts and procedures utilized in the financing of private schools, Christian schools, and private colleges. Emphasizes all aspects of the operations of a development office needed for planning and conducting fundraising campaigns. (Offered online only.)

 

GADM 840

School Facility Planning

3 credit hours

An in-depth review of all aspects of school physical plant operations including planning, constructing, utilizing, and maintaining school facilities. Emphasizes the preparation of administrators to plan and manage a complete school facilities program.

 

GADM 850

Legal, Political, and Ethical Issues in Educational Administration

3 credit hours

An integral analysis of the historical and contemporary legal, political, and ethical issues of public and private schooling, with an emphasis on national and state constitutional provisions, the political environment, laws, and court cases. Explores political, social, economic, and multicultural factors in the context of educational organizations and their constituent communities.

 

GADM 855

Instructional Theory and Practice

3 credit hours

An analysis of the theory and philosophy of selected instructional strategies in both public and private schooling. Applies research based principles and practices to the evaluation of teaching and learning.

 

GADM 860

Instructional Technologies in Education

3 credit hours

A review of the historical background, current issues, and future trends influencing the theoretical and practical uses of instructional technology. Uses a systematic approach stressing selection, evaluation, and classroom integration of instructional technology into the teaching and learning process. (Offered online only.)

 

GADM 865

Education in the Adult Lifespan

3 credit hours

An introduction to the concepts and experiences related to the physical, psychological, emotional, cognitive, social, and spiritual development of the individual from young adulthood to maturity. Includes developmental issues related to the self, family, society, work, retirement, aging, and death.

 

GADM 870

Quantitative Research

3 credit hours

Covers the creation and analysis of quantitative data used to carry out the objectives of research. Emphasizes the assumptions of the various methods, the relationship between the given method and the level(s) of measurement of the independent and dependent variables, and the relationship of research design to the given analytical method.

 

GADM 875

Qualitative Research

3 credit hours

Designed to acquaint the student with qualitative methods commonly used in educational research. Emphasis is on design features, scholarly rigor, and evaluation of selected studies. Students also implement data collection and analysis for a selected qualitative method. (Offered online only.)

 

GADM 880

Practicum in International Education

3 credit hours

Provides the student with the opportunity to become involved in a program of international education, which allows interaction with the peoples and culture of a specific region. Emphasis includes the historical, philosophical, cultural, and political aspects of this society as it relates to the education of its citizenry. The course enables the student to develop a mission-oriented and Biblically based worldview relative to the education of children and adults.

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the graduate program and permission of the professor.

 

GADM 882

Holy Spirit in Education

2 credit hours

An inquiry into and an examination of Spirit-directed education. The role of the Holy Spirit in education is viewed from both a historical and a current perspective. Studies the application of the person, function, and gifts of the Holy Spirit in education and the Christian distinctives of the educational process, along with the roles that the Church, schools, colleges, and universities play in the learning processes. (Cross-listed with GCSE 582).

 

GADM 885

Internship in Educational Leadership

1-3 credit hours

Specifically structured to permit interns to integrate theory and practice in a field-based setting under the guidance of an experienced cooperating administrator serving as a mentor. Provides the intern with a variety of meaningful leadership experiences in actual school-based settings. The experiences are coordinated by the university supervisor in consultation with the cooperating administrator.

 

GADM 900

Doctoral Dissertation

2-8 credit hours

The research (either a qualitative or quantitative) and writing of a dissertation that reports, evaluates, interprets, and synthesizes the results of that research. The purpose of the dissertation is to produce new knowledge, new materials, or new methods in the student’s field of specialization. The project is to be meaningful to the student and provide evidence of familiarity with past and current research in the field.

Prerequisites: Acceptance and approval of the dissertation prospectus by the candidate’s dissertation committee, the chair of the Graduate School of Education, and the Dean of the School of Education.

 

GADM 901

Dissertation Preparation I

.5 credit hours

The Dissertation Preparation courses are designed to assist the candidate as they develop the conceptual basis for their dissertation. They also provide the candidate practical knowledge that will help guide the writing of the dissertation. In Dissertation Preparation I, candidates will describe an educational problem and propose a purpose statement for their dissertation research.

Prerequisites:  GADM 600 Introduction to Doctoral Level Writing, if required as condition of admission (Candidates must have earned a grade of “B” or better) and GPED 683 Education Research Design (Candidates must have earned a grade of “B” or better).

 

GADM 902

Dissertation Preparation II

.5 credit hours

In Dissertation Preparation II, candidates will produce a draft of the “Background” and “Connections to Education Leadership” sections in dissertation chapter one.

Prerequisite: GADM 901 Dissertation Prep I (candidates must have earned a grade of “B” or better.)

 

GADM 903

Dissertation Preparation III

.5 credit hours

In Dissertation Preparation III, candidates will produce a research question/s which will guide the dissertation.  They will describe the methodology to be used to answer the research question and will include a method, sample and data gathering and analysis.

Prerequisites:  GADM 902 Dissertation Prep II (candidates must have earned a grade of “B” or better) and successfully (earn a grade of “B” or better) and GADM 870 Quantitative Research or GADM 875 Qualitative Research (candidates must have earned a grade of "B" or better.)

 

GADM 904

Dissertation Preparation IV

.5 credit hours

In Dissertation Preparation IV, candidates will produce a completed draft of chapter one to be submitted to their dissertation chair.

Prerequisite: Dissertation Prep III (Candidates must have earned a grade of “B” or better.)

 

GADM 920

Directed Study

1-3 credit hours

Allows students to pursue relevant educational literature and to conduct research projects that pertain to their degree programs and special interests. It also provides opportunities for students to examine existing studies, reports, and documents relevant to an area of interest and combine them into an insightful paper or a project.

Restriction: Doctoral standing and permission of the professor.

 

GADM 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Graduate BIBLICAL LITERATURE (GBIB)

 

GBIB 500

Greek Synthesis I

3 credit hours

An introduction to the forms and functions of the nominal and verbal systems of New Testament Greek. Emphasizes vocabulary building and basic translation. (This is the first of two courses.)

 

GBIB 501

Greek Synthesis II

3 credit hours

A continuation of GBIB 500. An introduction to the structure and functions of clauses focusing upon the significance of grammatical forms and translation of portions of the Greek New Testament.

Prerequisite: GBIB 500.

 

GBIB 507

Biblical Hermeneutics

3 credit hours

A study of the problems and methods of Biblical interpretation, including the factors of presuppositions, grammatical relationships and historical context, vocabulary, and figurative language.

Prerequisite: GTHE 517.

 

GBIB 510

Hebrew Synthesis I

3 credit hours

A basic introduction to Biblical Hebrew. Includes a survey of grammar, morphology, and syntax, taught by a combined inductive and deductive method. As the grammatical elements are learned, they are applied through the reading of Biblical passages.

 

GBIB 511

Hebrew Synthesis II

3 credit hours

A continuation of Hebrew Synthesis I with an increasing emphasis on reading the Hebrew text of the Old Testament. It completes the student’s preparation for basic Hebrew exegetical and hermeneutical study of the Old Testament.

Prerequisite: GBIB 510.

 

GBIB 515

Introduction to Biblical Literature

3 credit hours

A historical-thematic survey of the Old and New Testaments. Examines the content of the Biblical text, with emphasis on the cultural and historical background of the text and its modern cultural application.

 

GBIB 516

Biblical Eschatology

3 credit hours

A study of Old and New Testament teachings on eschatology, including those aspects of the Kingdom of God that are already present and those yet to be fulfilled. Specific attention is given to concepts such as eschatological Gospel, Messiah, parousia, second coming, resurrection, rapture, tribulation, millennium, judgment, signs of times, the Kingdom of God, and the present age and age to come.

 

GBIB 517

Paul: Mission and Message

3 credit hours

A study of the life, missionary journeys, and major theological themes of the Apostle Paul evidenced in his letters and Acts. Includes application of theological themes to the contemporary church.

 

GBIB 551

Old Testament Synthesis

3 credit hours

An introduction to critical areas of Old Testament study. Includes some background in history and geography.

 

GBIB 552

Historical Geography of Palestine

3 credit hours

A study of the geography and history of Palestine since antiquity, especially in relation to the nation of Israel and the Early Church. Includes study of other civilizations as they relate to Palestine.

 

GBIB 556

The Life and Teachings of Jesus (Matthew, Mark, and Luke)

3 credit hours

A study of Matthew, Mark, and Luke designed to enhance understanding of the person, message, and mission of Jesus in His Jewish milieu. Includes the distinctive aspects of each evangelist’s portrayal of Jesus.

 

GBIB 561

Old Testament Hermeneutics and Exegesis (Hebrew)

3 credit hours

An exegetical study of selected Old Testament passages. Involves sound exegetical method and critical problems and hermeneutics of the passages. Includes doctrinal significance.

Prerequisites: GBIB 511 and proficiency in Hebrew as demonstrated by examination PRF 052.

 

GBIB 571

New Testament Synthesis

3 credit hours

Examines the content of each document in the New Testament canon, a collection of texts that possesses unity and diversity of message. Each text is carefully studied by examining its cultural and historical background.

 

GBIB 573

I Corinthians

3 credit hours

An exegetical course that focuses on the contextual interpretation and contemporary application of insights and themes in the epistle. (Satisfies the prerequisite for any upper-level English Bible course.)

 

GBIB 581

New Testament Hermeneutics and Exegesis (Greek)

3 credit hours

An exegetical study of selected New Testament passages. Involves sound exegetical method and critical problems and hermeneutics of the passages. Includes doctrinal significance.

Prerequisite: GBIB 501 and proficiency in Greek as demonstrated by examination PRF 053.

 

GBIB 583

The Parables of Jesus in Their Jewish Context

3 credit hours

An examination of the parables of Jesus in light of their Jewish background. Studies rabbinic parables to understand the teaching methods of Jesus. Includes cultural, historical, and theological settings of the Gospel parables in light of the teachings of the Jewish people during the period.

 

GBIB 589

History and Culture of New Testament Times

3 credit hours

Studies in the historical-cultural backgrounds of the New Testament. Focuses on the distinctiveness of New Testament Christianity as well as the historical and cultural forces at work in its development.

 

GBIB 608

Eighth Century Prophets

3 credit hours

A study of the prophetic literature of the eighth century against its historical background. Includes a comparison of the prophets, noting similarities and differences in approach, content, purpose, and style.

 

GBIB 609

Exilic Prophets

3 credit hours

A study of the Hebrew prophets immediately before, during, and after the Exile. Emphasizes the effects of the Exile experience.

 

GBIB 611

Theology of the Old Testament

3 credit hours

A survey of the major doctrines of the Old Testament with special reference to their historical development within the political and religious institution of ancient Israel. (Cross listed with GTHE 611.)

 

GBIB 618

Matthew (Greek)

3 credit hours

An advanced course in translation and exegesis of the Greek text. Considers the Jewish and Hellenistic background of the Gospel text and analyzes the grammar and syntax—including Semitisms and Greek idioms—in the translation. The style, central theological themes, and narrative unity of the text is emphasized in the exegesis.

Prerequisite: GBIB 581.

 

GBIB 619

Romans (English)

3 credit hours

Exegesis of the epistle with emphasis on the central theological themes and their relevance and application to issues of the contemporary church.

 

GBIB 621

Theology of the New Testament

3 credit hours

A study of major themes and doctrines contained in the New Testament. Emphasizes the contributions of the various Biblical books to the unity of the New Testament. (Cross listed with GTHE 621.)

 

GBIB 623

Galatians and James: Law and Gospel

3 credit hours

An exegetical study focusing upon Galatians and James. Emphasizes the relationship between Law and Gospel and the ethical implications derived from these two distinct expressions of the Christian faith.

 

GBIB 624

Luke

3 credit hours

An exegetical study of Luke’s version of the message and mission of Jesus. Gives attention to both Jesus’ Jewish context and Luke’s presentation to the Gentiles. Includes application of central themes to the modern world and church.

 

GBIB 625

Gospel and Letters of John

3 credit hours

Exegesis of the Gospel and letters of John with explication of the major theological themes and contemporary application.

 

GBIB 626

The Book of Acts

3 credit hours

An exegetical study of the book of Acts with emphasis on major historical developments and theological themes contained in the text. Considers the composition, structure, and historical milieu of the book in preparation for the exegesis. Includes application and assessment of the exegetical insights for the contemporary church.

 

GBIB 628

Patterns of Ministry in the New Testament

3 credit hours

An examination of the Biblical pattern of ministry as revealed in pertinent New Testament passages and in the practices of representative ministries, particularly that of Paul.

 

GBIB 630

Pastoral Epistles

3 credit hours

An intensive study of the epistles to Timothy and Titus, with special reference to the doctrinal teaching and the Church’s situation as reflected in these writings. Includes critical problems pertaining to authorship, historical background, and contemporary application of the teachings of these epistles.

 

GBIB 632

Isaiah (Hebrew)

3 credit hours

An advanced reading and grammar course. Emphasizes vocabulary, syntax, and grammar. The grammar is used inductively as the need arises in the reading and translation of the text. Selected texts are translated and examined grammatically and historically in order to acquaint the student with the style, literary genre, and doctrine of the book.

Prerequisites: GBIB 561.

 

GBIB 633

Pentateuch (Hebrew)

3 credit hours

Concentrates on selected passages from the Pentateuch. Emphasizes exegetical methods and grammar. Gives attention to critical problems.

Prerequisites: GBIB 561.

 

GBIB 634

Wisdom Literature

3 credit hours

An examination of the origins of the Wisdom tradition and the adaptation of the tradition within the faith of Israel. A study of the literary sources illustrates the relationship between Old Testament Wisdom and the universal wisdom traditions of the ancient Near East.

 

GBIB 635

Theophanies/Hebrew Scripture (Hebrew)

3 credit hours

An intermediate-level course in reading and grammar. Emphasizes vocabulary, syntax, and grammar. The grammar is studied inductively as the need arises in the reading and translation of the texts. Selected texts are translated and examined grammatically and historically in order to acquaint the student with the language, style, and literary genres of theophanies in the Hebrew Scriptures.

Prerequisite: GBIB 561.

 

GBIB 636

Exodus (Hebrew)

3 credit hours

An advanced Hebrew reading class. Studies selected texts from the Book of Exodus in light of their historical and cultural background. The student is encouraged to develop linguistic skills as the questions of Hebrew grammar are examined.

Prerequisite: GBIB 561.

 

GBIB 637

Deuteronomy (Hebrew)

3 credit hours

Concentrates on the oral reading and interpretation of the Hebrew text of the book of Deuteronomy.

Prerequisite: GBIB 561.

 

GBIB 645

Biblical Archaeology

3 credit hours

An introduction to the purpose and methods of archaeology and a study of selected sites in western Asia and the Aegean. Stresses the significance of these excavations for Biblical study.

 

GBIB 646

Ancient Near East Civilization

3 credit hours

A study of civilization in the Near East from the rise of Mesopotamia and Egypt to the end of the first century A.D. Emphasizes the geography, history, writing, art, and institutions of this period. Focuses on western Asia and the Mediterranean.

 

GBIB 648

Israel Study Abroad Seminar

3 credit hours

Explores the land of the Bible through field experience, expert guiding with scholarly precision, and directed study of the cultural background of early Christianity. Students participate in a specialized tour of the Holy Land as they study the Bible.

 

GBIB 657

Old Testament History

3 credit hours

A course designed to examine ancient Israel in its historical and cultural milieu. Focuses on the period from the Patriarchs to the fall of Jerusalem to the Babylonians. Includes the origin and development of Israel’s political and religious institutions.

 

GBIB 663

Syriac

3 credit hours

A study of Syriac, also called “Christian” Aramaic. Because of its close relationship to the Aramaic portions of the Masoretic text of the Old Testament, the study of Syriac provides a valuable introduction to both Old and New Testament studies.

Prerequisite: Proficiency in Hebrew as demonstrated by passing PRF 052.

 

GBIB 676

Pauline Theology and Early

Jewish Thought

3 credit hours

Examines the cultural and historical background to the life and teachings of Paul the Apostle. Focuses on Paul’s cultural environment and the early Jewish sources, which can shed light on his thought and teachings.

 

GBIB 682

Synoptic Gospels (Greek)

3 credit hours

Concentrates on Jesus—the man, the mission, and the message—revealed in the Synoptic Gospels (Greek). Various hermeneutical approaches and interpretations are considered in aiding the student to fashion his or her own understanding. Discusses the relevance of Jesus and His mission and message for the student, church, and society today.

Prerequisite: GBIB 581.

 

GBIB 683

Mark (Greek)

3 credit hours

Translation and exegesis of selected pericopes concerning the authoritative person, teachings, and deeds of Jesus. Gives attention to Mark’s unique portrayal of Jesus to readers in his church and today.

Prerequisites: GBIB 571 and 581.

 

GBIB 684

Charismata in Early Christianity

3 credit hours

A study of the significance and function of charismata in early Christianity, focusing on the cultural background of the Early Church and the texts of the Old and New Testaments, post-Biblical Jewish sources, and the Apostolic Fathers.

 

GBIB 688

The Jewish Background to the Gospels

3 credit hours

A study of the historical, cultural, and religious background to the life and teachings of Jesus in light of early Jewish sources. Examines post-Biblical Jewish literature to gain fresh insights into the Gospels and message of Jesus.

 

GBIB 692

Parables of Jesus

3 credit hours

Scientifically examines the cultural and historical background to parables of Jesus as presented in the texts of the Gospels. Includes rabbinic parables and other early Jewish sources that can shed light on the teachings of Jesus. Studies the parables, taken from popular oral teaching, as a unique genre in literature.

 

GBIB 697

Jewish and Christian Prayer in the

Time of Jesus

3 credit hours

A study of the form, content, and structure of prayers in their historical context as prayed by the Jewish people and the Early Church. Examines the prayers of Jesus and the Early Church in light of Jewish prayers and blessings in the rabbinic literature, the Pseudepigrapha, the Apocrypha, and the Dead Sea Scrolls.

 

GBIB 704

Psalms (Hebrew)

3 credit hours

An exegetical study of selected representative Psalms. Includes a study of the principles of Hebrew poetry and the general structure and content of the Psalter. Emphasizes their theological significance and value for Christian living and worship.

Prerequisite: GBIB 561.

 

GBIB 712

Akkadian

3 credit hours

An introduction to the fundamentals of Akkadian, a cognate language to Hebrew. An inductive approach using the Code of Hammurabi. Designed to help the student better understand the culture and literature of the Ancient Near East and the background of the Old Testament.

 

GBIB 714

Ugaritic

3 credit hours

An introduction to the Ugaritic language and literature of ancient Ugarit in Northern Syria. Includes reading Ugaritic epics and myths and analyzing their influence on the poetry and prose of the Bible.

 

GBIB 715

The Bible and Midrash (Hebrew)

3 credit hours

An advanced Hebrew reading course designed to teach the student basic translation skills for Mishnaic Hebrew and introduce the student to Qumranic Hebrew. Includes selected reading from rabbinic literature and the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Prerequisite: GBIB 561.

 

GBIB 729

Colossians/Ephesians (Greek)

3 credit hours

A course designed to be primarily a translation and detailed exegesis of the original text of these epistles, with special attention given to grammar, interpretation, and application. Examines the composition, authorship, interrelationships, and purposes of the two letters in their historical settings in preparation for the exegesis.

Prerequisite: GBIB 581.

 

GBIB 744

Septuagint (Greek and Hebrew)

3 credit hours

An introduction to the Septuagint version of the Old Testament. Includes an overview of its history, importance for textual studies, influence upon other versions of the Bible and on the New Testament, and its distinctive theological presuppositions.

Prerequisites: GBIB 561 and 581 and Greek and Hebrew language proficiencies (PRF 052 and 053).

 

GBIB 749

Directed Study

1-3 credit hours

A directed course of research and writing under the supervision of a faculty member. Topics must be approved by the professor, advisor, and academic dean and related to the use of practical theology.

Restriction: Permission of instructor.

 

GBIB 754

Coptic Studies

3 credit hours

A study of the Sahidic dialect of Coptic. Instruction focuses on grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. Students study Christian literature from the 4th century A.D.

Restriction: Admission to the academic master of arts program.

 

GBIB 755

Classical Egyptian

3 credit hours

A study of the fundamentals of the language of the hieroglyphs. Concentrates on the hieroglyphic script and writings from the Middle Kingdom period.

Prerequisite: GBIB 511.

 

GBIB 756

Thesis Research and Proposal

3 credit hours

Designed to provide a Master of Arts in Biblical Literature student with guidelines, requirements, and procedures for researching and writing an advanced research M.A. thesis. Emphasis is placed on extensive research and the completion of a written thesis proposal.

Restriction: Admission to the Master of Arts in Biblical Literature program and the approval of the Associate Dean and the candidate’s thesis committee.

 

GBIB 757

Thesis Writing

3 credit hours

Research and writing of a thesis that reports, evaluates, interprets, and synthesizes the results of that research. The resulting thesis demonstrates a mastery of existing resources and knowledge in a specific area of discipline.

Restriction: GBIB 756; Admission to the Master of Arts in Biblical Literature program and the approval of the Associate Dean and the candidate’s thesis committee.

 

GBIB 761

Advanced Syriac

3 credit hours

A critical comparison of the Greek and Syriac texts of the Gospels. This is a research course with special attention given to the issue of Greek translation.

Restriction: GBIB 663, proficiency in Hebrew PRF 052 and proficiency in Greek PRF 053.

 

GBIB 764

Biblical Aramaic

3 credit hours

An inductive and deductive study of the Aramaic portions of the Old Testament, with emphasis on grammar and translation.

Prerequisite: GBIB 511 or 561; Proficiency in Hebrew PRF 052.

 

GBIB 766

Introduction to Rabbinic Thought and Literature

3 credit hours

An introduction to the field of Rabbinical Studies.

 

GBIB 767

Seminar in Old Testament

3 credit hours

A course focusing on various aspects of Old Testament studies. Topics vary.

 

GBIB 768

Epistle to the Hebrews

3 credit hours

A study of the message of the book with consideration of its Old Testament parallels, Jewish-Christian perspective, and relationship to the Pauline corpus.

 

GBIB 769

Seminar in New Testament

3 credit hours

Investigation of selected contemporary issues in New Testament studies.

 

GBIB 774

Jewish Apocalyptic Literature

3 credit hours

Examines the cultural setting and the historical circumstances that gave rise to the Jewish apocalyptic literature. Studies selected apocalyptic literature from the Old Testament as well as the Apocrypha and Pseude-pigrapha.

 

GBIB 777

Exegesis of Romans (Greek)

3 credit hours

An advanced exegesis course that analyzes and interprets the New Testament letter of Paul to the Romans. The course views the epistle in its historical setting and applies its insights and themes to the modern Christian church and society.

Prerequisites: GBIB 571 and 581.

 

GBIB 787

Cross/Resurrection in the NewTestament (Greek)

3 credit hours

A study of the historical-theological theme of cross/resurrection in the New Testament. Emphasizes translation and exegesis of the primary passages in the Greek text pertaining to this dual motif.

Prerequisite: GBIB 571 and 581.

 

GBIB 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to the department.

 

 

Graduate Business (GBUS)

 

GBUS 500

Internship

1-3 credit hours

A practicum in which the student works one-on-one with an employer to make recommendations for improvement in the work force. The student’s work includes both a closely supervised environment and projects of personal initiative.

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of leveling and/or graduate courses.

 

GBUS 504

Communications in Contemporary Business

3 credit hours

Designed to expose the graduate student to all areas of business communications necessary for the contemporary professional. Focuses on written communication, public speaking, mediation, group facilitation, assessment techniques, consulting, and event coordination. Addresses communicating in the boardroom, staff meeting, or consultation arenas.

Restriction: Permission of department.

 

GBUS 550

Legal Issues of Nonprofit Organizations

2-3 credit hours

Provides the students with a basic grounding in the laws and regulations governing nonprofit organizations. Includes procedures for incorporating, reporting, and maintaining tax-exempt status as a nonprofit organization, a familiarity with legal principles and research methods, and an overview of the legal, regulatory, and policy issues facing contemporary nonprofit organizations.

 

GBUS 556

Personal Financial Planning

2 credit hours

Focuses on the key concepts, tools, and techniques of contemporary personal finance. Financial problems are addressed in the context as a result of the lack of management rather than lack of money. Topics discussed to avoid financial problems include the time value of money, the importance of saving, how to establish good credit and a high credit score, the correct use of credit, the use of credit cards, the establishment of financial goals, how to reduce the costs of automobile and life insurance, purchase of an automobile, and rent versus purchase of a house. (Cross listed with FIN 244.)

Prerequisite: Undergraduate course in financial management.

 

GBUS 565

Strategic Management

2-4 credit hours

The capstone course of the M.B.A. program. Emphasizes the integration of accounting, finance, management, and marketing within the framework of policy, organization and behavioral theory, problem identification, decision making, oral and written skills, strategy, confidence, and the ability to develop positive corrective-action techniques. (4 credit hours for M.B.A. students; 2 credit hours for M.B.A. students completing a concentration in Entrepreneurship.)

Prerequisites: GMGT 561, GACT 562, GFIN 563, and GMKT 564 with a grade of C or better and capability of creating case presentations using multimedia computer software.

 

GBUS 568

Entrepreneurship Capstone

2-3 credit hours

Designed to teach students the components of planning, starting, operating, and selling a company. Approaches entrepreneurship with comprehensive perspective from marketing, management, accounting, and finance. Students engage in strategic thinking about business ideas, including finding a niche, forming a legal entity, raising capital, hiring employees, taxes and bookkeeping, and valuing and selling a business.

Prerequisites: GACT 562, GMKT 564, GFIN 555, GFIN 561, and GFIN 563.

 

GBUS 572

Ethical Leadership

2-3 credit hours

A study of the interrelationships among individuals, business firms, service industries, nonprofit organizations, churches, and government in American society. Focuses on the issues and problems that confront the leaders exercising social responsibility and examines the nature and objectives of selected public policies impinging on business. Includes a comprehensive analysis and synthesis of philosophies that determine cultural values and an evaluation in terms of the student’s own personal value system. Addresses management’s role in upholding Christian principles as it interacts with government and society. (Cross listed with BUS 372.)

 

GBUS 574

Competitive Business Intelligence

2 credit hours

A survey of the use of sophisticated information resources to access relevant and reliable data vital to sound business decision-making. Students are expected to develop strong teamwork and leadership skills in the ethical identification, evaluation, and use of these resources. Students also interact with industry leaders, including presenting their competitive intelligence research findings.

 

GBUS 582

Managerial Economics

3 credit hours

Analysis of the basic premises of both macroeconomic and microeconomic theory, including production, price, distribution, and interrelationships with the national economy. Emphasizes applications in managerial economics and economic forecasting.

Prerequisite: BUS 201.

 

GBUS 598

Research Methodology

3 credit hours

Designed to provide students with an understanding of basic research techniques and the investigation of problems oriented toward current management situations. This includes research design, sampling techniques, and quantitative methods for analyzing data. The statistical tools learned in GMGT 585 are used to perform statistical analysis.

 

GBUS 599

Research

1-3 credit hours

An opportunity to demonstrate research skills by conducting original research under the direction of a faculty member. Requires data collection, data analysis, and data synthesis resulting in a research paper.

Prerequisites: GBUS 504, 585, 598, and MBA core.

 

GBUS 699

Graduate Business Seminar

0 credit hours

Selected topics, assignments, and/or activities preparing graduate students for better professional placement and engagement developed for participation. (Pass/Fail only).

Corequisite: Last semester standing.

 

GBUS 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Graduate business leveling (Gblv)

 

GBLV 501

Foundations of Management

1 credit hour

An opportunity to demonstrate the required aptitude in the ACBSP in the madated leveling common professional component in management. This course requires working through a series of self-paced modules and passing a final exam with a minimum score of 70%.

 

GBLV 502

Foundations of Business Law

1 credit hour

An opportunity to demonstrate the required aptitude in the ACBSP in the mandated leveling common professional component in business law. This course requires working through a series of self-paced modules and passing a final exam with a minimum score of 70%.

 

GBLV 503

Foundations of Organizational Behavior

1 credit hour

An opportunity to demonstrate the required aptitude in the ACBSP in the mandated leveling common professional component in organizational behavior. This course requires working through a series of self-paced modules and passing a final exam with a minimum score of 70%.

 

GBLV 504

Foundations of Statistics

1 credit hour

An opportunity to demonstrate the required aptitude in the ACBSP in the mandated leveling common professional component in statistics. This course requires working through a series of self-paced modules and passing a final exam with a minimum score of 70%.

 

GBLV 505

Foundations of Accounting

1 credit hour

An opportunity to demonstrate the required aptitude in the ACBSP in the madated leveling common professional component in accounting. This course requires working through a series of self-paced modules and passing a final exam with a minimum score of 70%.

 

GBLV 506

Foundations of Financial Management

1 credit hour

An opportunity to demonstrate the required aptitude in the ACBSP in the madated leveling common professional component in financial management. This course requires working through a series of self-paced modules and passing a final exam with a minimum score of 70%.

 

GBLV 507

Foundations of Marketing

1 credit hour

An opportunity to demonstrate the required aptitude in the ACBSP in the mandated leveling common professional component in marketing. This course requires working through a series of self-paced modules and passing a final exam with a minimum score of 70%.

 

GBLV 508

Foundations of Economics

1 credit hour

An opportunity to demonstrate the required aptitude in the ACBSP in the mandated leveling common professional component in economics. This course requires working through a series of self-paced modules and passing a final exam with a minimum score of 70%.

 

 

Graduate Christian School Education (GCSE)

 

GCSE 582

Holy Spirit in Education

2 credit hours

An inquiry into and an examination of Spirit-directed education. The role of the Holy Spirit in education is viewed from both a historical and a current perspective. Studies the application of the person, function, and gifts of the Holy Spirit in education and the Christian distinctives of the educational process, along with the roles that the Church, schools, colleges, and universities play in the learning processes. (Cross listed with GADM 882).

GCSE 603

Guidance and Counseling in the Christian School Setting

3 credit hours

A survey course designed to introduce students to a Christian school guidance program. Students learn about the needs, design, facets, and effective means of implementing a program. (Offered online only.)

 

GCSE 613

Organization and Administration of Christian Schools

3 credit hours

Defines and analyzes the administrator’s role in Christian schools. Gives attention to developing the leadership competencies needed for organizing, administering, supervising, and evaluating educational personnel and programs. Includes simulated problem-solving.

 

GCSE 643

Issues in Education

3 credit hours

A study of current issues in education. Focuses on those significantly affecting national, international, public, and private schools, and emphasizes analyzing the current and future roles of Christian school education and educators. Includes, but is not limited to, the following topics: Christian school challenges; personal/ professional issues affecting classroom teachers; legal and societal pressures; the changing scene in the public sector; and state, national, and global concerns and influences in education. Specific topics may vary from year to year. (Offered online only.)

 

GCSE 673

Internship (Curriculum)

3 credit hours

Examines the effectiveness of current curricula through active participation in innovative elementary Christian schools. Provides opportunities to create unique designs.

 

GCSE 683

Internship (Administration)

3 credit hours

Provides opportunities to observe Christian school educational programs and to integrate theories of administration with administrative practices. Each student is assigned to a practicing administrator in a model Christian school.

 

GCSE 684

Internship

3 credit hours

A continuation of GCSE 683.

 

GCSE 690

Directed Study

1-3 credit hours

Directed individual or group study in the area of Christian school education.

 

GCSE 713

Educational Leadership and Supervision

3 credit hours

A presentation of Biblical principles and practices of leadership and supervision within the context of improving instruction, enhancing outcomes of learning, and developing relationship skills. Covers characteristics of leaders, significance of vision and supervision, analysis of teacher effectiveness, and survey of staff development programs. Stresses assessment of personal attributes of leadership and application of leadership strategies. (Offered in Summer Institute only.)

 

GCSE 723

Administration of College and Higher Education

3 credit hours

Examines the scope of the organization and administration of higher education institutions. Helps professionals in higher education develop and refine competencies to enhance administrative skills and performance. Designed to help those active in administrative processes and functions in higher education institutions, regardless of size, to survive and prosper in the 21st century.

 

GCSE 724

Governance and History of College and Higher Education

3 credit hours

Examines the scope of the governance and history of higher education institutions. Helps professionals in higher education develop and refine competencies to enhance administrative skills and performance. Designed to help those active in administrative processes and functions in higher education institutions, regardless of size, to survive and prosper in the 21st century.

 

GCSE 725

Bible School Foundations

3 credit hours

Addresses administrative and educational issues in establishing a Bible institute in the United States or abroad. Examines various models for Bible institutes, financial and legal concerns, and principles of postsecondary teaching and assessment.

 

GCSE 733

Characteristics of the Adult Learner

3 credit hours

An overview of elements related to educational approaches to adult education. The needs of adult learners such as development, social, and spiritual are considered in light of contemporary theories of education. Emphasizes Biblical principles and perspectives of discipleship and leadership training and the ministry of the local church. (Offered online only.)

 

GCSE 743

Curriculum Survey and Design for College and Higher Education

3 credit hours

An examination of the design, management, and evaluation of curriculum for post-secondary schools, including Bible schools, institutes, and colleges. Emphasizes the relationship between the curriculum and the mission of the institution. (Offered in Summer Institute only.)

 

GSCE 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Graduate Counseling (GCSL)

 

GCSL 528

Christian Approaches to Counseling

3 credit hours

Provides students with an understanding of the worldview that supports Christian counseling. Examines the assumptions, goals, and techniques of five approaches to Christian counseling.

Prerequisite: GTHE 518 recommended.

 

GCSL 571

Theology of Counseling

3 credit hours

A course designed to provide a Biblical and theological framework for the work of the Christian counselor. Integrates theological truth and psychological principles by exploring such topics as epistemology, empowerment, and whole-person healing within the Pentecostal/charismatic traditions.

Prerequisites: GCSL 528, GTHE 510 and 518.

 

GCSL 580

Professional Issues in Counseling

3 credit hours

Introduces students to the issues and responsibilities facing professional counselors. Covers professional roles and functions, self-care strategies, inter-agency collaboration, and advocacy processes necessary for client success. Also provides models, practices, and processes of counselor supervision and professional credentialing.

 

GCSL 624

Counseling Diverse Populations

3 credit hours

Develops culturally effective counselors through learning from one’s own culture, being teachable in encounters with those who differ, and coming to respect other cultural perspectives as equal to one’s own. Emphasizes the historical perspectives of multicultural counseling/therapy, cultural competence, socio-political influences by using counseling models as well as variables related to several subgroups of America’s racial/ethnical populations, and lifestyles.

 

GCSL 625

Counseling Theories

3 credit hours

A survey of the major concepts and counseling approaches of the contemporary therapeutic systems. Students learn to incorporate concepts and approaches into their own personalized style of counseling.

 

GCSL 626

Principles of Biblical Counseling

3 credit hours

An introduction to basic concepts and procedures of Biblical counseling. Students learn to integrate knowledge and skills into their personal counseling style.

 

GCSL 628

Crisis, Trauma, and Addictions Counseling

3 credit hours

An introduction to the history, research, theory, and skill development of crisis, trauma, and the neurobiological foundation of addictive disorders counseling including the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of clients. The course will examine the spiritual issues associated with crisis, trauma, and addictions.

 

GCSL 630

Counseling Methods

3 credit hours

Designed to foster an understanding of the developmental nature of the counseling process. Students examine case studies, review and critique videos of various counseling techniques, role-play as both counselor and client, and also explore methods of treating addictions, crises, and trauma-causing events. Includes the use of prayer, Scripture, and the empowerment of the Holy Spirit.

 

GCSL 631

Addiction in the Family Counseling

3 credit hours

Overviews recent research findings regarding addition, as embedded within the family context, and examines contemporary developments in family addictions counseling with an emphasis on empirically supported models and treatments, Prevention and wellness are also emphasized along with treatment planning and intervention strategies.

 

GCSL 635

Human Growth and Development

3 credit hours

Addresses the biological, socioemotional, and cognitive factors that shape human development from infancy through old age and in diverse social contexts. Includes study of spiritual factors and developmental theories. (Cross listed with PRM 635.)

 

GCSL 637

Contemporary Family Development

3 credit hours

Examines the family within both traditional and contemporary cultural contexts in terms of relationships, family stages, issues, and trends in a diverse society with an orientation to wellness and prevention.

Prerequisite: GCSL 643 recommended.

 

GCSL 640

Human Sexuality

3 credit hours

Integrates empirical, clinical, and Biblical perspectives of human sexuality and it many expressions throughout life.

 

GCSL 641

Assessment in Marital and Family Therapy

3 credit hours

A study of the methods and measures of assessment of couples and families. Includes a variety of interview styles and common evaluations.

 

GCSL 643

Marital and Family Systems Theory

3 credit hours

An overview of the principles of general system theory as applied to understanding couple and family relationships, including the church family. Emphasizes learning to think relationally by attending to patterns, organization, structure, communication, and the distinctions between first and second-order change.

 

GCSL 644

Addiction in the Family Theory

3 credit hours

An overview ofthe principles of general systemand other family theories as applied to understanding addictions within the context of the family relationship network. Emphasizes learning to think rationally by attending patterns, organization, structure, communication, and the distinctions between first and second-order change as related to conceptualizing addiction and addiction recovery.

 

GCSL 650

Professional Ethics in Counseling

3 credit hours

A study of ethical standards of professional organizations and credentialing bodies, and applications of ethical and legal considerations in professional counseling. Presents various models of ethical decision making, as well as the ethical standards from the ACA and AAMFT.

Course fee: Background check, $25.50.

 

GCSL 670

Introduction to Psychopathology

3 credit hours

An introductory study of abnormal behavior. Emphasizes DSM-V classification system; description, clinical causation, and treatment of the major forms of psychological disorder; and associated developmental, personality, and religious variables affecting behavioral patterns.

 

GCSL 675

Marriage and Family Therapy

3 credit hours

An overview of recent research findings regarding couple’s relationships and examines contemporary developments in marriage and family therapy, with an emphasis on empirically supported models and treatments. Prevention and wellness are emphasized along the treatment planning and intervention strategies.

Prerequisite: GCSL 643 recommended.

 

GCSL 679

Vocational and Occupational

Guidance

3 credit hours

Examines career development theories, related life factors, and decision-making models with an emphasis on the practical application of these theories.

 

GCSL 681

Group Dynamics

3 credit hours

An investigation of small group process through reading and surveying research literature, with an emphasis on the development of interpersonal skills. Studies a variety of intervention techniques from various theoretical approaches.

 

GCSL 685

Assessment of Addictive Behaviors

3 credit hours

Students learn the assessment skills necessaryfor the field of addictions and mental health counseling. Students learn to conduct a clinical interview and Mental Status Exam, as well as administer and interpret psychological tests and assessments specific to addictions counseling.

Course fees: Instrument fee, $40.00; background check, $25.50; liability insurance, $15

 

GCSL 722

Counseling Across the Lifespan

3 credit hours

A course designed to highlight and examine the biopsychosocial persepctive faced by individuals of all ages in a contemporary cultural context, equip counselors-in-training with effective therapeutic strategies in working with children, adolescents, adults and the elderly, including diagnosis and treatment planning.

 

GCSL 724

Testing and Assessment I

3 credit hours

An introductory course in assessment terminology, history, and procedures in a multicultural society. Presents knowledge and skills in appraising children and adolescents in terms of their cognition, aptitude, achievement, learning disability, neuropsychology, environment, and personality. Emphasizes using various forms of assessment, instead of standardized testing only.

Course fees: Test fee, $40.00; background check $25.50; liability insurance $15.

 

GCSL 732

Testing and Assessment II

3 credit hours

Continues to build on the knowledge and skills acquired in GCSL 724. Students learn to conduct a clinical interview and Mental Status Exam, as well as to administer and interpret personality assessments and symptom behavior.

Prerequisite: GCSL 724.

Course fees: Test fee $40.00; background check $25.50; liability insurance $15.

 

GCSL 740

Drug and Alcohol Counseling Theory

3credit hours

A survey of the major concepts and counseling approaches of the contemporary therapeutic systems within the drug and alcohol counseling field. Students learn to incorporate concepts and approaches into their own personalized style of addictions counseling.

 


GCSL 750

Pharmacology of Drugs and Abuse

3 credit hours

Overviews the most recent research regarding the principles and practice of psychopharmacology. Focuses on conceptualizing disease, with particular emphasis on the behavior of neurotransmitters and their interactions with pharmaceuticalsand other substances. Information is considered from an addictions counseling perspective.

 

GCSL 760

Cognitive Therapy

3 credit hours

An in-depth presentation of a cognitive approach to therapy with an emphasis on the process of identifying and changing core beliefs (second order change).

 

GCSL 762

Narrative Therapy

3 credit hours

An in-depth presentation of a narrative approach to therapy. Emphasizes techniques of externalization and restoring.

 

GCSL 763

Counseling Practicum

3 credit hours

Provides an opportunity for students to begin applying theory and developing counseling skills under supervision. Students experience selected client care responsibilities with special emphasis given to ethnic and demographic diversity. Students gain practical experience in counseling, assessment, consultation, and professional behavior. Includes observing experienced counselors, and engaging in co-counseling and other entry-level counseling activities.

Prerequisites: GCSL 528, GCSL 630, GCSL 635, GCSL 724 (LPCC),  GCSL 625 (LPCC), GCSL 641 (MFTC), GCSL 643 (MFTC), GCSL 670, GCSL 675 (MFTC), GCSL 784, GCSL 580 or 650; PRFT 057, 064.; GCSL 624 recommended.

Course fees: Background check, $25.50, liability insurance, $15.

 

GCSL 770

Diagnosis and Treatment of Psychopathology

3 credit hours

An advanced course to provide students with an indepth understanding of the various definitions, theories, and empirical foundations of psychopathology. Emphasis is given to the role of various disorders. Special emphasis is given to religious expressions of psychopathology. The efficacy and effectiveness of treatment methodologies is also explored.

Prerequisite: GCSL 670.

 

GCSL 781

Counseling Internship I

3 credit hours

Provides the practical application of theory and development of counseling skills under supervision. Students experience selected client care responsibilities with special emphasis given to ethnic and demographic diversity. Students gain experience in core areas of counseling, assessment, consultation, and professional functioning.

Prerequisite: GCSL 763.

Course fees: Background check, $25.50, liability insurance, $15.

 

GCSL 784

Counseling Research

3 credit hours

An introduction to the language and terms of counseling research, including models and methods of research. Applications are made to program development and evaluation, as well as to the use of empirically verified treatments in the practice of Clinical Mental Health Counseling, Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling.

 

GCSL 785

Counseling Internship II

3 credit hours

Provides the practical application of theory and development of counseling skills under supervision in a second internship. Students continue to gain experience in selected client care responsibilities with special emphasis given to ethnic and demographic diversity. Students gain further experience in core areas of counseling, assessment, consultation, and professional functioning.

Prerequisites: GCSL 650, 763. and 781.

Course fees: Background check, $25.50, liability insurance, $15.

 


GENERAL STUDIES (GEN)

 

GEN 099

Whole Person Assessment

0 credit hours

Orients the student to the University outcomes, philosophy of assessment, and the electronic portfolio. Acquaints the student with the technology skills needed for the ePortfolio.

Whole Person Assessment fee: $70.

 

GEN 101

Prior Learning Assessment

3 credit hours

A study designed to assist the student seeking college credit for prior learning experiences. Defines experiential learning and examines the steps of the assessment process. Guides the student through the first draft of a prior learning assessment portfolio. (The course is a prerequisite to applying for prior learning assessment and credit. Offered only through distance learning.)

  

GEN 114

Online Learning Strategies

3 credit hours

A study designed to orient the student to the online learning approach and format, university outcomes, philosophy of assessment, electronic portfolio (ePortfolio), and various study strategies. Combines theory and practice to help students develop technology skills necessary for navigating ORU’s online systems. Discusses practical strategies for success in an online learning program. Also acquaints the student with the nature, philosophy, and lifestyle of ORU.

 

GEN 150

Introduction to Whole Person Education

1 credit hour

This course orients students to the Whole Person Education philosophy with an overview of the ORU Student Learning Outcomes: (1) Spiritually Alive, (2) Intellectually Alert, (3) Physically Disciplined, (4) Socially Adept, and (5) Professionally Competent by providing guidance needed for success in college, introducing students to the basic tenets of health fitness, and acquainting students with the technological skills needed for the Whole Person Assessment process.

Prerequisites: Medical Assessment (completed as part of the application process)

Course Fees: $220
 

GEN 499

Senior Paper/Project

3 credit hours

An independent research paper or project completed under the direction of a faculty advisor. The student prepares a senior paper/project related to the learning experiences and purpose of the student’s individualized liberal studies degree program. A senior paper may consist of independent research and analysis, expository writing on issues related to the area(s) of concentration, or a description and analysis of approved field experiences. With the approval of the faculty advisor, an appropriate project may be submitted in lieu of the senior paper (e.g., in the areas of performance, production, or original writing and development.) (Offered only through distance learning.)

 

 

Graduate entrepreneurship (Gent)

 

GENT 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

GEOGRAPHY (GEO)

 
GEO 201

Principles of Earth Science Lecture

3 credit hours

An introduction to earth sciences: geology, oceanography, geomorphology, and meteorology. Discusses the processes at work within the earth, on the surface, and in the air and oceans. Emphasizes plate tectonic theory. (Cross listed with PSC 201.)

Corequisite: GEO 201L.

 

GEO 201L

Principles of Earth Science Laboratory

1 credit hour

Lab exercises to supplement GEO 201 Lecture. (Cross listed with PSC 201 Lab.)

Corequisite: GEO 201.

Lab fee: $75.

 

GEO 307

Cultural Geography

3 credit hours

Study of the interrelationships between humanity and the environment. Discusses the present distribution of humans as a cultural history process involving the availability and the use or abuse of cultural and natural resources. (This is the recommended geography course for teacher certification in social science.)

 

GEO 350

Environmental Geography

3 credit hours

A study of human ecology focusing on problems created by human habitation of and interaction with the earth. Topics include culture, ecology, population, resources, food, energy, and pollution. Also considers social, economic, political, and ethical issues. (Cross listed with PSC 350.)

Prerequisite: One semester of lab science.

 

GEO 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

GERMAN (GER)

 

GER 101

Elementary German I

4 credit hours

A beginning course in German. Involves intensive oral work and an introduction to reading, writing, and speaking. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL novice mid competencies. (This course does not count toward the bachelor of arts language requirement but can be used for elective credit.)

Lab fee: $40.

 

GER 102

Elementary German II

4 credit hours

Builds on the skills learned in GER 101. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL novice high competencies.

Prerequisite: GER 101 with a grade of “C” or higher or demonstrated proficiency.

Lab fee: $40.

 

GER 203

Intermediate German I

3 credit hours

Continued practice in German with review of grammar and composition and focus on aural/oral skills. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL intermediate mid competencies. Includes selected readings in addition to the text.

Prerequisite: Proficiency examination or GER 102 with a grade of “C” or higher.

Lab fee: $40.

 

GER 451

Special Readings

1-3 credit hours

Special readings in German to cover general or specific areas as determined by the professor to meet the needs of the student.

Restriction : Permission of instructor.

 

GER 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Graduate Finance (GFIN)

 

GFIN 500

Internship

1-3 credit hours

A practicum in which the student works one-on-one with an employer to make recommendations for improvement in the work force. The student’s work includes both a closely supervised environment and projects of personal initiative.

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of leveling and/or graduate courses.

 

GFIN 514

Investments

3 credit hours

Designed to serve investors who are or will be actively developing and monitoring their own investment portfolios. Includes techniques, vehicles, and strategies for implementing investment goals in a portfolio context and in light of risk-return trade-offs. Includes an overview of personal finance and investments and specific investment topics such as common stocks, mutual funds, commodities, and real estate. Emphasizes using Value Line Investment Survey to evaluate common stocks and Morningstar’s Mutual Fund Value to evaluate mutual funds.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; completion of undergraduate finance and accounting classes.

 

GFIN 550

Commercial Bank Management

3 credit hours

A course designed to further develop the student’s understanding of the banking environment. It is also designed to bring into perspective the significant changes that have taken place in the banking community the past few years and how to deal with the challenges ahead. Emphasizes the areas of new legislation, regulation, financial market, deposits, lending, and overall bank management. (This course is intended for those students in the M.B.A. program with concentration in finance. Cross listed with FIN 428.)

 

GFIN 555

Entrepreneurship

2-3 credit hours

A study of the art and science of entrepreneurship. Develops technical knowledge through discussion of the tools needed to successfully start and operate a business. Emphasizes the qualitative aspects of entrepreneurship. (Cross listed with MGT 421.)

 

GFIN 561

Capital Markets

2-3 credit hours

An introduction to the methods of securing growth financing through domestic and global private capital markets. (Cross listed with FIN 461.)

Prerequisite: FIN 338.

 

GFIN 563

Finance

3 credit hours

Emphasizes the managerial functions of planning, organizing, directing, staffing, and controlling as they relate to administration of the finance function. Discusses the relationship of finance to other business functions of production, marketing, and accounting. A top management perspective of policy, strategy, and decision-making is taken. Applies finance concepts, principles, techniques, and tools of analysis through problem solving.

Prerequisite: FIN 338.

 

 

GFIN 572

Principles of Estate Planning

2-3 credit hours

An overview of estate planning in light of the federal transfer tax system, including federal gift taxation, federal and state estate taxation, and federal generation-skipping transfer taxation. Examines various forms of property ownership and introduces various tools and planning strategies that minimize the costs, fees, taxes, and time delays associated with the transfers of those various ownerships and the related tax implications. (Cross listed with FIN 472.)

 

GFIN 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Graduate Health and Physical Education (GHPE)

 

GHPE 503

Graduate Health Fitness

1 credit hour

Develops an understanding of and personal appreciation for the relationship of physical activity and fitness to health. Emphasizes the concept of health fitness, cardiorespiratory system, nutrition and body composition, muscular-skeletal fitness, and stress management. Includes consumer health information and a required weekly physical activity lab. (Cross listed with GHPE 703.)

Prerequisite: Medical assessment.

 

GHPE 515

Graduate Aerobics

0.5 credit hour

A flexible course designed to help graduate students meet the ORU fitness and lifestyle requirement. (No walking or modified field tests allowed. Cross listed with GHPE 715.)

Prerequisite: HPE 001 and 002 or GHPE 503 or GHPE 703.

 

GHPE 525

Graduate Walk For Fitness

0.5 credit hour

A course designed for graduate students who need a walking program and field test. (Cross listed with GHPE 725.)

Prerequisites: HPE 001 and 002 or GHPE 503 or GHPE 703.

 

GHPE 703

Graduate Health Fitness

1 credit hour

Develops an understanding of and personal appreciation for the relationship of physical activity and fitness to health. Emphasizes the concept of health fitness, cardiorespiratory system, nutrition and body composition, muscular-skeletal fitness, and stress management. Includes consumer health information and a required weekly physical activity lab. (Cross listed with GHPE 503.)

Restriction: Doctor of ministry student and medical assessment.

 

GHPE 715

Graduate Aerobics

0.5 credit hour

A flexible course designed to help graduate students meet the ORU fitness and lifestyle requirement. (No walking or modified field tests allowed. Cross listed with GHPE 515.)

Prerequisites: HPE 001 and 002; or GHPE 503 or 703

Restriction: Doctor of ministry student.

 

GHPE 725

Graduate Walk for Fitness

0.5 credit hour

A course designed for graduate students who need a walking program and field test. (Crosslisted with GHPE 525.)

Prerequisites: HPE 001 and 002; or GHPE 503 or 70

Restriction: Doctor of ministry student.

 

GHPE 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Graduate International Business (GINB)

 

GINB 560

International Finance

3 credit hours

A course designed to prepare students to successfully negotiate the financial transactions that are part of international commerce. Topics include arrangement of credit, risk management, currency exchange, hyper-inflation, and capital budgeting in the multinational enterprise.

 

GINB 570

International Marketing

3 credit hours

Designed to provide an analysis of the five “Ps” of marketing as they relate to the globalization of the economy. Emphasizes contemporary periodical articles, as well as textual materials. The course is augmented with case analysis and student projects to highlight both the theoretical and the operational aspects of international marketing. (Cross listed with MKT 361.)

 

GINB 580

Readings in International Business

3 credit hours

Designed to facilitate the acquisition of advanced knowledge and skills relating to cultural adaptation, global strategy, and international policy. Readings include both classic and contemporary materials.

Restriction: MBA students with international business concentration.

 

GINB 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Graduate Management (GMGT)

 

GMGT 500

Internship

1-3 credit hours

A practicum in which the student works one-on-one with an employer to make recommendations for improvement in the work force. The student’s work includes both a closely supervised environment and projects of personal initiative.

Prerequisite: A minimum of 12 hours of leveling and/or graduate courses.

 

GMGT 521

Administration of Nonprofit

Organizations

3 credit hours

A study of the functions of management—planning, organizing, leading, and controlling—within the nonprofit sector. Focuses on theories of organizations and general concepts of management, governance, and leadership. Includes organizational design, behavior, performance, and effectiveness and analyzes the special character and management of problems of nonprofit organizations. (Cross listed with MGT 465.)

 

GMGT 541

Creative Thinking

2-3 credit hours

An introduction to the modern practices of creative thinking in all areas of the business environment. (Cross listed with MGT 372.)

 

GMGT 551

Executive Leadership Development

2-3 credit hours

An advanced course in managerial philosophy and techniques. Emphasizes self-development of the executive and develops skills in planning, organizing, motivating, communication, and controls. Analyzes new perspectives on management and incorporates extensive research. Focuses on the challenge of change, qualitative research. Focuses on the challenge of change, qualitative tools, the ethical and moral environment, and the prospects for management in the next decade. (Cross listed with MGT 443.)

 

GMGT 553

Organizational Behavior

2-3 credit hours

A study of individual and group behavior and dynamics within organizations, with an emphasis on motivation, leadership, stress, group and intergroup dynamics, conflict, power and politics, and culture. (Cross listed with MGT 353.)

 

GMGT 556

Small Business Basics

2-3 credit hours

A survey of management principles concerning planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and staffing at the organizational level in the small business environment. (Cross listed with MGT 422.)

 

GMGT 560

Conflict Resolution

2-3 credit hours

An introduction to the principles and application of the processes and theories of personal conflict resolution, mediation, and negotiations. Focuses on conflict resolution in various business-related settings. (Cross listed with MGT 461.)

 

GMGT 561

Management in a Globalized Era

3 credit hours

Challenges students to conceptualize the systemic nature and the strategic management of an organization. Introduces students to advanced readings in areas such as organizational diagnosis and change management, organizational effectiveness, organizational design, motivation, leadership, and the impact of global cultural factors.

 

GMGT 563

Organizational Dynamics

3 credit hours

A study of individual, group, network, and cultural components that determine effectiveness of an organization. Organizations are studied from various perspectives using metaphors (e.g., machine, organism, symphony, jazz group, prison, culture). Discovery includes dimensions of efficiency and effectiveness as well as analysis of quality of work life and productivity. Also addresses issues of alignment and effective and dysfunctional organizations.

 

GMGT 585

Business Analytics

3 credit hours

A study of the use of computer applications to improve managerial data analysis and decision-making skills. Excel and varied Excel Add-In software are used with an integrated business database to teach varied statistical, decision modeling, and simulation techniques related to managerial decision making.

Prerequisite: Prior computer course .

Restriction: Permission of department.

User license: $30.

 

GMGT 600

Leadership Studies

3 credit hours

A study of the art and science of leadership. The student’s knowledge is developed by the text, numerous books on leadership, and weekly guest speakers.

 

GMGT 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Graduate Marketing (GMKT)

 

GMKT 500

Internship

1-3 credit hours

A practicum in which the student works one-on-one with an employer to make recommendations for improvement in the work force. The student’s work includes both a closely supervised environment and projects of personal initiative.

Prerequisite: Twelve hours of leveling and/or graduate courses.

 

GMKT 533

Consumer Behavior

2-3 credit hours

A study of the consumer as the focal point in a dynamic economic system. Explores a large body of published and unpublished literature, discusses generalizations, and develops various practical implications of consumer information processing. Such an approach leads to the exploration and use of new marketing techniques and methods. (Cross listed with MKT 333.)

 

GMKT 534

Integrated Marketing Communications

2-3 credit hours

A study of the process of analyzing, planning, and evaluating promotional strategy and management. Examines the varied elements of advertising, personal selling and sales promotion, and optimum promotional mix, through integration and organization. (Cross listed with MKT 334.)

 

GMKT 535

Services Marketing

3 credit hours

Teaches students how to apply prior marketing knowledge and strategy development to the services sector, thus challenging students to implement competitive service strategies for customer-focused management. Emphasizes using frameworks for increasing customer satisfaction and retention.

Prerequisites: MGT 130 and MKT 130.

 

GMKT 546

Personal Selling

2-3 credit hours

A study of the management of the outside sales force. Topics include organizing, staffing, operating, and planning functions in a sales-management context. Uses computer simulation. (Cross listed with MKT 346.)

Prerequisite: MKT 130.

 

GMKT 550

Development of Nonprofit Organizations

2-3 credit hours

An overview of marketing concepts, techniques, and promotional strategies as they pertain to nonprofit organizations. Topics covered include marketing, public relations, publicity, communications, market research, situational analysis, fundraising, resource development strategies, and entrepreneurship. Gives special consideration to managerial strategies required to sustain and enhance the resource base of nonprofit organizations.

 

GMKT 564

Marketing Management

3 credit hours

An examination of marketing concepts, policies, and procedures related to consumer and industrial goods. Emphasizes analytical tools used to aid in marketing decision-making. Includes all aspects of marketing and provides additional depth and applications through case studies.

Prerequisites: MGT 130 and MKT 130.

Prerequisite or corequisite: GBUS 574.

 

GMKT 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

GLOBAL MINISTRY AND THE MARKETPLACE (GMMP)

 

GMMP 499

Senior Paper/Portfolio

3 credit hours

Designed for seniors who, after completing 150 hours of business or missions internship experience, write a major paper that takes into account their intership experiences, philosophy of ministry and a research component that deals with a specialized are of business and missions.

Prerequisites: MISS 397 abd THE 217.

 

 

Government (GOV)

 

GOV 101

American Government and Politics

3 credit hours

A study of the institutions and processes of American government and politics at the national, state, and local levels, with attention to policy-making and the relationship between citizenship and Christian faith. (Honors sections are available for this course.)

 

GOV 201

Introduction to Political Science

3 credit hours

A description and evaluation of government including the basic content and methods of political science.

 

GOV 299

Introduction to Law

3 credit hours

An introduction to the law and legal system of the United States, covering the basic history, structure, and methodology of the U.S. adversarial system of justice. Topics covered include administrative law, constitutional law, civil procedure, torts, contracts, family law, and criminal law.

 

GOV 305

Comparative Government

3 credit hours

Provides students with an understanding of the successive paradigms or worldviews in Western American civilization and their consequences upon political and economic institutions. Prepares students for Biblical Christian leadership.

 

GOV 311

International Relations

3 credit hours

A survey of topics germane to international relations, including nation-states, sovereignty, war and peace, supranational and transnational organizations, and international law. Also includes a component on world geography.

 

GOV 321

Legislative Process

3 credit hours

A study of the law-making process in the United States Congress with attention to presidential, bureaucratic, and judicial influences. Surveys the legislative processes of state and foreign governments.

 

GOV 322

Political Parties and Elections

3 credit hours

An analysis of the functions and internal operations of American political parties and interest groups as they act in the electoral and legislative processes and compares them to political parties and electoral systems in other countries.

 

GOV 323

American Political Leadership

3 credit hours

An in-depth study of the origin and historical and political evolution of the highest elected office in the free world. Explores the presidency, as well as its relationships with Congress, the Supreme Court, the bureaucracy, states, and localities. Also deals with possible reforms for improving the effectiveness of the office.

 

GOV 331

Western Political Theory

3 credit hours

A study of the great political thinkers from Plato to the present. Examines the spread of Christianity and the development of political theory, institutions, and concepts of justice and law in the West.

 

GOV 335

Christian Faith and Government: Theory

3 credit hours

Explores the Bible’s teachings on politics and government. Includes Jewish and Christian political history and how it influences the Western world.

 

GOV 336

Christian Faith and Government: Practicum

3 credit hours

Applies Biblical principles to current political situations. Studies appropriate methods of access to and influence upon American government. Includes field trips to appropriate government locations.

 

GOV 341

Public Administration

3 credit hours

A study of the application of public policy at all levels of government. Analysis of problems in public financing and budgeting, organization and personnel, the legal context, and the relationship of bureaucracy to the public interest.

 

GOV 369

Protocol and Diplomacy

3 credit hours

Focuses on surveying the culture of the business and diplomatic worlds. Surveys the skills and behaviors generally associated with professionalism in both the public and private realms. Includes an analysis of the actions of several key leaders in the 20th and 21st centuries that is synthesized into a coherent diplomatic ethic.

 

GOV 370

Area Studies

3 credit hours

Focuses on a specific area of the world, such as Asia or Latin America. Content varies. (May be taken up to three times for credit.)

 

GOV 381

American Foreign Policy

3 credit hours

An in-depth analysis of the significant persons, ideas, events, issues, and trends in the history of international politics, American foreign relations, and statecraft.

 

GOV 391

International Political Economy

3 credit hours

A survey of integral persons, ideas, events, issues, and trends relative to the rise and decline of the market system of economics in both domestic and international economic policy.

 

GOV 449

Political Science Research Methods

3 credit hours

Introduces students to methods of conducting professional research in the field of political science. Students learn to do political analyses and write a research prospectus. (This is a writing-intensive course.)

 

GOV 450

American Jurisprudence

3 credit hours

Examines the history, theory, and philosophy of American law from its Judeo-Christian roots to its modern secular incarnations.

 

GOV 451

American Constitutional Law

3 credit hours

A study of the historical development and current application of the U.S. Constitution to the American Legal system using judgments of the Supreme Court in precedent-setting cases..

 

GOV 452

Civil Liberties, Civil Rights,

and Social Justice

3 credit hours

Examines basic American civil liberties, the historic origins of the civil rights movement, and the modern views of social justice in relation to the demands for a well-ordered society.

 

GOV 453

Criminal Law and Procedure

3 credit hours

Explores and explains the criminal justice process, examining the accused’s rights under the Bill of Rights, as well as the roles of the prosecuting and defense attorneys and the federal judicial system.

 

GOV 454

Legal Policy and Process

3 credit hours

An introduction to the basic constitutional function of the court system. (This course is offered online only).

 

GOV 455

Trial Advocacy

3 credit hours

A foundational course in the development of logic, critical thinking, and argumentation skills in the courtroom setting.

 

GOV 457

International Law

3 credit hours

Examines international law from a global perspective, identifying worldwide, state, organizational, and individual actors. Topics include jurisdiction, sovereignty, treaties, use of force, human rights, human trafficking, and the environment.

 

GOV 458

Legal Skills Internship

3 credit hours

A practical application of legal skills including logic, critical thinking, and argumentation in a law office, courtroom, or alternative dispute resolution system.

 

GOV 459

Legal Research and Writing

3 credit hours

This course covers principles of legal research and writing. Teaches the foundational skills used the practice of law including identifying issues, locating cases and reporting their findings in client letters, memos, case briefs, and other legal documents.-

 

GOV 461

Public Policy Analysis

3 credit hours

A study of the intellectual frameworks used in the formulation and implementation of public policy, as well as the individuals responsible for making policy. Analyzes and evaluates contemporary political, social, and economic issues.

 

GOV 479

Readings in Government

1-3 credit hours

An investigation of subjects dictated by student need and faculty expertise. Examples include “Campaigns and Political Parties,” “Comparative Communism,” and “Politics and Markets.” (The course may be taken more than once for credit.)

 

GOV 487

Oklahoma Intercollegiate Legislature Internship

1-3 credit hours

Designed to introduce the legislative process, including parliamentarian debate, Roberts Rules of Order, and an overall knowledge of how to conduct oneself in a live legislative debate format. Oklahoma Intercollegiate Legislature (O.I.L.) is a mock legislative process conducted at the Oklahoma state capitol twice each year. Internships are available in local, state, national, and international organizations and government staff and agencies. (The number of credit hours and work required is largely dependent upon faculty-student discussion and the internship requirements.)

 

GOV 488

Model United Nations Internship

1-3 credit hours

An introduction to the function and role of the United Nations in international affairs; the practical application of the diplomatic process, including parliamentarian debate; and an overall knowledge of how to conduct oneself in a live diplomatic debate format. The Model United Nations (M.U.N.) is a simulation of the general assembly process conducted in St. Louis in late February of each year.

 

GOV 489

American Studies Internship

1-3 credit hours

An internship in a local, state, national, and even international organization. (The number of credit hours and work required is largely dependent upon faculty-student discussion and the internship requirements.)

 

GOV 499

Senior Paper/Project

3 credit hours

Student preparation of a research paper under the direction of a faculty member. Includes instruction in research methods and styles and in critiquing written materials. Students eligible for graduation honors must complete a successful oral defense before a faculty committee.

Restriction: Senior standing.

 

GOV 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Graduate NonProfit Management (Gnpm)

 

GNPM 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Retriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Graduate Professional Education (GPED)

Note: Admission to the Professional Education Program is a prerequisite for most GPED courses.

 

GPED 503

History and Philosophy of Education

3 credit hours

Overview of various philosophies of education with emphasis on the implications of their presuppositions on educational theory and practice. Includes an analysis of educational problems and issues in education using the tools of history and philosophy of education and the implications on educational theory and practice in an institution.

 

 
GPED 505

Pedagogy I

3 credit hours

A study of cultural diversity combined with the knowledge of English language learners and students with disabilities. Uses the teacher candidates’ knowledge of diversity and apply it through technology in the classroom to educate all learners. (Cross listed with PED 305.)

 

GPED 506

Pedagogy II

3 credit hours

A study of human life development from conception through adolescence with more emphasis on middle school secondary school students. Management of classroom routines and behavior interwoven into the course with information on assessing students learning. Includes a 20 hour practicum. (Crossl isted with PED 306.)

Prerequisite: GPED 505.

 

GPED 513

Human Growth and Development

3 credit hours

A study of human life from conception through adolescence. Emphasizes the continuity of developmental phases of infants, children, and adolescents, delineating the interrelationships among various aspects of development—biological, cognitive, emotional, social. (Cross listed with PED 313.)

 

GPED 563

Educational Technology

3 credit hours

Focuses on the selection, preparation, use and sources of media and computer technologies for future teachers. (Cross listed with PED 363.)

Educational technology fee: $25.

 

GPED 571

Professional Education Seminar/Portfolio

0-1 credit hour

Aids student teachers in the construction of a professional portfolio that fulfills requirements of the School of Education and reflects competencies required for teaching licensure in the State of Oklahoma. (Cross listed with PED 361.)

 

GPED 572

Classroom Management and Educational Law

3 credit hours

A study of the various approaches in behavior management. Emphasizes behavior modification techniques. Introduces teacher candidates to token learning principles and how they apply to behavior management in the classroom. Provides the opportunity for the study of the relationships between students, parents, teachers, schools, and federal, state, and local government with an emphasis on the legal framework with which each participant must interact. (Cross listed with PED 372.)

 

GPED 582

Educational Assessment

2-3 credit hours

Theory and application of educational evaluation and assessment including evaluation for planning and instruction; construction and evaluation of classroom tests; test values and limitations; evaluation and administration of standardized tests; portfolio development and evaluation; and grading and reporting procedures. (Cross listed with PED 382.)

 

GPED 583

Statistical Research Methods

3 credit hours

An opportunity to apply educational research methods to answer statistical questions. Emphasis is on providing further information in an area of interest to the student.

 

GPED 584

Internship in K-12/Secondary Education

3 credit hours

Provides opportunities to observe K-12 or secondary school educational programs and to integrate theories of teaching with teaching practices. Each student is assigned to a practicing educator in a model K-12 or secondary school.

 

GPED 593

Evaluation and Assessment in Education

3 credit hours

An overview of the theory and application of educational evaluation and assessment including evaluation for planning and instruction; construction and evaluation of classroom tests; test values and limitations; evaluation and administration of standardized tests; portfolio development and evaluation; and grading and reporting procedures. Gives practical applications for Christian school administrators.

 

GPED 650

Student Teaching: Away

10 credit hours

In-class observation, teacher assistance, and student teaching under the professional supervision of a university supervisor and a cooperating teacher in a school outside the Tulsa area. Teacher candidates engage in both curricular and extracurricular programs. Includes theories of education evaluation and testing. (Cross listed with PED 450.)

Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program and acceptance of student teaching application.

Restriction: Permission of the dean.

Course fee: $1300.

 

GPED 665

Student Teaching: Early Childhood

4-5 credit hours

In-class observation, teacher assistance, and student teaching under the professional supervision of a university supervisor and a cooperating teacher in an early childhood classroom. Teacher candidates engage in both curricular and extracurricular programs. Includes theories of education evaluation and testing. (Cross listed with PED 465.)

Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program and acceptance of student teaching application.

Corequisite: GPED 571.

 

GPED 675

Student Teaching: Elementary

4-10 credit hours

In-class observation, teacher assistance, and student teaching under professional supervision of a university supervisor and a cooperating teacher in an elementary school. Students engage in both curricular and extracurricular programs. Includes theories of education evaluation and testing. (Cross listed with PED 475.)

Prerequisite or corequisite: GPED 571.

 

GPED 683

Educational Research Design

3 credit hours

Designed for graduate students desiring to develop a research proposal. Includes topic selection; library search; research methodology, design, and style; and techniques of writing. Provides students with an understanding of basic research methods related to the investigation of current educational issues or problems.

 

GPED 685

Student Teaching: 7-9

4-5 credit hours

Seven-weeks (full-time) in-class observation, teacher assistance, and student teaching under professional supervision of a cooperating teacher in a junior high or middle school and a college supervisor. Students engage in both curricular and extracurricular programs. Includes theories of education, evaluation, and testing. (Cross listed with PED 485.)

 

GPED 690

Directed Study

1-3 credit hours

Allows the student to pursue a literature search and conduct a research project in education that pertains to the degree program and is of interest to the student. Special activities and/or projects may be suggested by the professor.

 

GPED 695

Student Teaching: 10-12

4-5 credit hours

Seven weeks (full-time) in-class observation, teacher assistance, and student teaching under professional supervision of a cooperating teacher in a high school and a college supervisor. Students engage in both curricular and extracurricular programs. Includes theories of education, evaluation, and testing. (Cross listed with PED 495.)

Prerequisite: GPED 571.

 

GPED 713

Educational Leadership,

Supervision, and Evaluation

3 credit hours

A study of basic principles and practices in modern school administration; current exemplary practices in supervision, group study, visitation, and exchange teaching concepts; and principles and methods to evaluate and improve teaching techniques.

 

GPED 723

School Finance

3 credit hours

A study of the conceptual basis of the economics of education—both private Christian and public schools—as well as taxation, distribution systems, tuition, grants, and policy analysis. Also considers sources of funding, control of expenditures, general principles of financial administration, and a review of requirements of Oklahoma State Law concerning financial accounting and procedures. (Offered in Summer Institute only.)

 

GPED 733

School Law/Legal Issues in Education

3 credit hours

Provides knowledge of the general principles of school law. Consideration is given to an understanding of legal implications of the operation and administration of private Christian and public school systems. Includes school law as it relates to the State of Oklahoma, the State Board of Education and the Attorney General. Consideration of PL94-142, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, other Federal acts with impact on school district operations, and current issues affecting schools.

 

GPED 743

Organization and Administration of

Public Schools

3 credit hours

A survey of topics pertinent to public school administration including the organization and implementation of elementary, secondary, and vocational/technical school systems; roles and responsibilities of boards of education, superintendents of schools, principals, and other school staff; laws, procedures, regulations and policies related to management of certificated and noncertificated school staff; relationships between administration and other school personnel; and the recruitment, selection, promotion, morale, salary, and evaluation of staff.

 

GPED 753

Curriculum/Instructional Design and

School Services

3 credit hours

A critical study of foundations, procedures, and theories in instructional programs common in early childhood education and elementary and secondary schools; selection and organization of content, teaching techniques and materials; and the organization and implementation of instructional strategies in a school system.

 

GPED 760

Workforce Training and Development

3 credit hours

Examines the practical applications of workplace learning and performance models on employee training and development. Students assist managers in public and private organizations to analyze, evaluate and propose learning solutions that enhance talent development.

Prerequisite: GPED 753

 

GPED 763

Human Resources in Education

3 credit hours

Designed to help prospective school administrators in the development of human relations skills, interpersonal relationships, and group process skills.

 

GPED 773

School Public Relations

3 credit hours

Designed for graduate students desiring to develop a working knowledge of the functions of public relations in school leadership. Addresses concerns central to planning, developing, and implementing a practical and effective public relations program in a school setting.

 

GPED 783

Internship/Practicum in Elementary School Administration

1-4 credit hours

Provides supervised, practical, and professional field experience in an area of elementary school administration for the advanced or graduate student. Subject matter varies within the department’s field of study.

 

GPED 793

Internship/Practicum in Secondary

Administration

1-4 credit hours

Provides supervised, practical, and professional field experience in an area of secondary school administration for the advanced or graduate student. Subject matter varies within the department’s field of study.

 

GPED 823

Group Relations/Multicultural Education

3 credit hours

Prepares educational leaders to deal with cultural diversity in the community, curriculum, and classroom. Examines current issues of multiculturalism in society and educational settings.

 

GPED 834

Organization and Supervision of Programs for Exceptional Individuals

3 credit hours

The study of the exceptional child and the establishment of a program to identify, evaluate, remediate, and effectively manage the behavior of students with special academic needs. Also addresses the administrative plan and structure, including personnel, facility scheduling, program integration with existing curriculum and schedule, legal responsibilities and liabilities, parental involvement, and continued evaluation for each identified student. (Offered in Summer Institute only.)

 

GPED 835

Advanced Theories of Learning and Brain Research

3 credit hours

An advanced study of current research and practices relating to theories of learning and brain research as it relates to education. Emphasizes practical classroom application of the research.

 

GPED 855

Instructional Theory and Practice

3 credit hours

An analysis of the theory and philosophy of selected instructional strategies in both public and private schooling. Applies research based principles and practices to the evaluation of teaching and learning.

 

GPED 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Graduate Special Education (GSED)

 

GSED 523

Parent and Families of Students with Special Needs

3 credit hours

A study of counseling techniques and counseling theories, community resource agencies, and the use of the multidisciplinary team applied to counseling exceptional individuals and their parents. (Cross listed with SED 323. Offered in Summer Institute only.)

Prerequisite: GSED 553.

 

GSED 553

Introduction to Special Education: Mild-Moderate Disabilities

3 credit hours

Acquaints students with different exceptionalities served in the schools. Focuses on assessment procedures, placement, methods, materials, and teaching strategies. (Includes a 15-hour practicum. Cross listed with SED 353.)

 

GSED 563

Effective Instruction for Students with Mild-Moderate Disabilities

3 credit hours

A comprehensive overview of the most current effective teaching strategies for special education. Provides a model for application to a variety of skill and content areas. Examines advances in technology, multicultural awareness, curriculum development, and thinking skills. Incorporates concrete, meaningful teaching activities and demonstrations. (Includes a practicum. Cross listed with SED 363. Offered in Summer Institute only.)

Prerequisite: GSED 553.

 

GSED 613

Assessment and Program Planning

3 credit hours

Develops competencies in utilizing diagnostic instruments and interpreting evaluation results. The major components are (1) informal assessment procedures, (2) formal assessment procedures, (3) identifying performance discrepancies, (4) administration and interpretation of selected instruments, and (5) summarizing information in a written report. (Cross listed with SED 313. Offered in Summer Institute only.)

Prerequisite: GSED 553.

 

GSED 623

Issues, Trends, and Curriculum Modification in Special Education

3 credit hours

Gives the student an understanding of adapting commercially prepared instructional materials and developing teacher-made materials to meet the unique needs of exceptional individuals. Emphasizes writing and implementing IEPs for both self-contained and mainstreamed placements. This course is a combination of field trips and outside club involvement with special needs students. (Includes a practicum. Cross listed with SED 423. Offered in Summer Institute only.)

Prerequisite: GSED 553.

 

GSED 652

Behavior Management Strategies

3 credit hours

Examines strategies for managing disruptive behavior in the special education and regular classroom, preschool, and home. Includes practical techniques, philosophical, legal, ethical, and pedagogical issues. (Offered in Summer Institute only.)

Prerequisite: GSED 553.

 

GSED 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

Graduate THEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL STUDIES (GTHE)

 

GTHE 508

Signs and Wonders and the Healing Ministry

1-2 credit hours

Providing a Biblical, theological and practical examination of signs and wonders and miracles in the ministry of the Church. The course provides practical, contemporary demonstration of this Biblical concept by exposing students to leaders in the Body of Christ who exercise signs and wonders in their ministries.

 

GTHE 510

Holy Spirit Empowerment in Life and Ministry

2-3 credit hours

An overview of the basic theological beliefs and lifestyle undergirding Oral Roberts University. The course analyzes the Biblical concepts and principles of the Person and work of the Holy Spirit. Examines the gifts of the Holy Spirit and indicates how contemporary Christians may personally relate to them. Provides a Biblical, theological, and practical examination of signs, wonders, miracles, and a lifestyle of giving and receiving in the life and ministry of believers.

 

GTHE 516

Theology and History of Global Mission

3 credit hours

An examination of the Biblical mandate to evangelize the world from its earliest manifestation in Genesis to its application in the New Testament. Also includes a treatment of how well this mandate has been obeyed throughout the history of the Church. (Cross listed with PRM 516.)

 

GTHE 517

Seminar in Theological Research

3 credit hours

Designed to permit the theological research student to acquire a degree of expertise in the use of the library’s many facilities. Emphasizes a working knowledge of research tools and research methodology. Discusses selective problems in theological research and addresses the scholarly process and modern information systems. Focuses on writing skills and the textual tradition embodied in book form. The course also examines the basic form, content, and style of an acceptable research paper.

 

GTHE 518

Introduction to Theology

3 credit hours

Introduces the discipline of systematic theology and provides a comprehensive overview of Christian doctrine. (Designed for non-master of divinity students who require an introduction to the field of study.)

 

GTHE 519

Church History: An Introduction

3 credit hours

An introductory study of the development of the Christian Church from the Apostolic period to the present day. Examines major historical movements and theological issues and how Christians wrestled with various options open to them, thereby shaping the future direction of the Church.

 

GTHE 539

Black Church History and Theology

3 credit hours

An examination of the Black church, Black theology, and their contributions to the Kingdom of God and the Christian community. Examines the salvation experience of Black people, social issues, preaching, and worship.

 

GTHE 551

Systematic Theology I

3 credit hours

An introduction to Christian theology and an examination of the doctrines of revelation, God, creation, and humanity.

 

GTHE 561

Systematic Theology II

3 credit hours

An examination of the doctrines of sin, Christology, the atonement, the Holy Spirit, salvation, the church, and eschatology.

 

GTHE 571

Church History I

3 credit hours

A study in the development of the Christian church from the Apostolic period to the Reformation. Examines the major historical movements and theological issues of the period, particularly the Christological controversies of the Early Church.

 

GTHE 573

Major Religions of the World

3 credit hours

Acquaints the student with the historical and contemporary beliefs and practices of the world’s major religious faiths other than Christianity. (Cross listed with PRM 573)

 

GTHE 581

Church History II

3 credit hours

A study designed to delineate and investigate the various lines of thought in the pre-Reformation, Reformation, and Protestant periods. Emphasizes the Reformation, its causes, development, and consequences.

 

GTHE 611

Theology of the Old Testament

3 credit hours

A survey of the major doctrines of the Old Testament with special reference to their historical development within the political and religious institutions of ancient Israel. (Cross listed with GBIB 611)

 

GTHE 621

Theology of the New Testament

3 credit hours

A survey of the major themes and doctrines contained in the New Testament. Emphasizes the contributions of the various Biblical books to the unity of the New Testament. (Cross listed with GBIB 621)

 

GTHE 622

The Doctrine of God

3 credit hours

A study of the existence, essence, names, attributes, and triunity of God, with a view toward fully integrating these scriptural teachings into the worship and mission of the church.

 

GTHE 624

Christian Apologetics

3 credit hours

An examination of classical apologetical systems to determine their coherency and/or adequacy as defenses for the Christian faith. Specific attention is focused upon presuppositional apologetics.

 

GTHE 631

Theological German

3 credit hours

Studies the German language for reading knowledge. Designed for the student entering graduate studies.

 

GTHE 632

Theological French

3 credit hours

A reading course in theological French.

 

GTHE 638

Contemporary Religious Cults

3 credit hours

An examination of the theological and historical roots of the present-day cult movement. Analyzes various cults in contemporary America and focuses upon their unique doctrines as compared to orthodox Christianity.

 

GTHE 647

The Doctrine of Redemption

3 credit hours

Studies the doctrine of salvation in Jesus Christ. The Biblical and historical dimensions of soteriology are integrated with a survey of contemporary perspectives on Christ as Mediator, Liberator, and Reconciler.

 

GTHE 657

Theology of Martin Luther

3 credit hours

An investigation of the life, thought, and influence of Martin Luther, with emphasis upon a firsthand knowledge of major theological issues of his ministry.

 

GTHE 658

Biblical Authority

3 credit hours

Analyzes the issue of the authority of the Bible in modern theology. The course provides a historical overview of the role of Holy Scripture in Christian theology and explores such concepts as inspiration, authority, infallibility, and inerrancy. Investigates related concerns such as canon, tradition, translation, hermeneutics, Biblical criticism, the witness of the Spirit, and proclamation as these impinge upon one’s view of the authority of the Scriptures.

 

GTHE 659

Ecclesiology: Church in the 21st Century

3 credit hours

A study of the nature, forms, polities, marks, and functions of the church, including an examination of the church as a charismatic fellowship and the promise of a Trinitarian ecclesiology, with a view toward a practical vision for doing church work in today’s world.

 

GTHE 660

Ethics and Contemporary Issues

3 credit hours

A discussion of current Biblical, theological, and pastoral issues in our culture with an attempt to motivate the Christian community to understand and act upon these issues.

 

GTHE 661

Introduction to Christian Ethics

3 credit hours

Examines the moral life and the Biblical, theological, and methodological ethic of the Christian Way. Traces theories of philosophical ethics and leads to the distinctive Christian ethic. Examines Christian principles and procedures for decision-making, as they relate to practical life problems.

 

GTHE 663

Charismatic Theology

3 credit hours

A study of the theology of the Pentecostal/charismatic movements of the 20th century. Discusses central issues such as Spirit baptism and spiritual gifts from Biblical, historical, and theological perspectives.

 

GTHE 670

Contemporary Theology

3 credit hours

A survey of key theologians, movements, and issues in contemporary theology introduced by a brief historical overview of modern theology.

 

GTHE 674

Denominational Polities

3 credit hours

A survey of organizational and governmental structures of various churches and/or denominations.

 

GTHE 675

The Early Church Fathers

3 credit hours

Examines the lives and thoughts of the Greek and Latin Fathers of the Christian Church. Gives attention to the development and substance of Christian doctrine during the Patristic period. Uses primary sources, lectures, readings, and discussion.

 

GTHE 676

The Age of Reformation

3 credit hours

An investigation of the life and thoughts of the great leaders of the Protestant Reformation in the context of the socio-cultural developments of the 16th and early 17th centuries.

 

GTHE 678

The Theology of Revival and Renewal

3 credit hours

A study of the Biblical and theological foundations for both the continual renewal of the Church and periodic revivals within the Church, including historical perspectives.

 

GTHE 681

Historical Theology

3 credit hours

A survey of theological issues and developments in the history of the Christian church. Considers issues and developments closely related to the people and events.

 

GTHE 684

Reformed Theology

3 credit hours

An investigation of the theology of the Reformed and Presbyterian Churches and the theology of the sixteenth century French Protestant reformer. Gives special attention to the ideas of John Calvin and his Institutes of the Christian religion. Outlines the development of the Reformed heritage up to the present time.

 

GTHE 685

Christianity and Islam

3 credit hours

An overview of Muslim faith and practice, with special attention to comparisons with Christianity and implications for Christian witness. Discusses and presents research on selected themes in theology and related fields.

 

GTHE 686

Theology of John Wesley

3 credit hours

Studies the life and theology of John Wesley with special reference to the various influences affecting his doctrine of prevenient, justifying, and sanctifying grace.

 

GTHE 692

Pneumatology

3 credit hours

Studies New Testament passages relating to the Pentecostal doctrine of the Baptism in the Holy Spirit. Gives particular attention to the Spirit’s gifts or manifestations. Designed to provide a viable exegetical basis for a Pentecostal theology of Spirit baptism.

 

GTHE 694

The Pentecostal/Charismatic Movements in Historical Perspective

3 credit hours

A historical and theological overview and analysis of the roots and development of the classical Pentecostal movement, the healing revival, the Protestant charismatic movement, and the Catholic charismatic movement.

 

GTHe 696

Divine Healing: A Theological and Historical Study

3 credit hours

An examination of the theological and historical roots of the doctrine and practice of divine healing from the Apostolic period to the present, with special emphasis on the movement as it developed in America during the 19th and 20th centuries. Describes the special foundational relationship between the divine healing movement and the Pentecostal and charismatic movements.

 

GTHE 700

Post-Modernism and 21st Century Ministry

3 credit hours

An exploration of various expressions of a post-modern mood in popular culture and in philosophy and theology. Investigates ways in which Christian ministry in the 21st century can be pursued in light of strengths and weaknesses in post-modernism.

 

GTHE 744

Seminar in Historical Studies

3 credit hours

Discusses and presents research on selected themes in church history, historical theology, or related fields of interest.

 

GTHE 745

Seminar in Theological Studies

3 credit hours

Discusses and presents research on selected themes in theology and related fields.

 

GTHE 749

Directed Study

3 credit hours

Directed research and writing under the supervision of a faculty member on topics approved by the department and related to subject matter in the academic M.A. curriculum.

Prerequisite: Admission to the academic master of arts program.

 

GTHE 756

Thesis Research and Proposal

3 credit hours

Designed to provide a Master of Arts in Theological-Historical Studies student with guidelines, requirements, and procedures for researching and writing an advanced research M.A. thesis. Emphasis is placed on extensive research and the completion of a written thesis proposal.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Arts in Theological-Historical Studies program and the approval of the program director and the candidate’s thesis committee.

 

GTHE 757

Thesis Writing

3 credit hours

Research and writing of a thesis that reports, evaluates, interprets, and synthesizes the results of that research. The resulting thesis demonstrates a mastery of existing resources and knowledge in a specific area of discipline.

Prerequisites: GTHE 756; Admission to the Master of Arts in Theological-Historical Studies program and the approval of the program director and the candidate’s thesis committee.

 

GTHE 760

Christology

3 credit hours

A Biblical, historical, and theological exploration of the person and work of Christ, with special reference to the practical implications of this doctrine for the disciple-making mission of the church.

 

GTHE 763

The Biblical Doctrine of Grace

3 credit hours

Studies the Biblical, historical, theological, and practical dimensions of the doctrine of grace, which constitutes the uniqueness of the Christian faith, is the essence of the gospel, and is the transforming and liberating power of Christian experience and mission.

 

GTHE 768

Ethics in Pastoral Ministry

3 credit hours

A course concerned with the ethical dimensions of pastoral ministry and the relationship between theological ethics and pastoral care—in effect, the relation of God’s moral will as expressed through His creative and redemptive grace to humanity caught in the web of personal moral failure and general moral evil. Addresses problems of sin and evil raised by the issues in pastoral ministry.

 

GTHE 769

Ethics of Jesus

3 credit hours

An inductive research into the moral lifestyle of Jesus and its meaning for contemporary lifestyles. Examines traditional and modern approaches to the Sermon on the Mount and Jesus’ enunciation of His mission in Luke 4:18. Includes the ethical Kingdom of God teachings of Jesus.

 

GTHE 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Modern Hebrew (HEB)

 

HEB 101

Elementary Hebrew I

4 credit hours

A beginning course in Modern Israeli Hebrew. Covers oral/aural work vocabulary, grammar, and composition. Includes reading and writing in both print and cursive. Includes present tense of Qal verbs, simple dialogues and oral presentations. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL novice high competencies. (This course does not count toward the bachelor of arts language requirement, a minor, or a major, but can be used for elective credit.)

Lab fee: $40.

 

HEB 102

Elementary Hebrew II

4 credit hours

Builds on skills learned in HEB 101. Emphasizes aural/oral skills, the present tense of the hif’il and hitpa’el verb stems and infinitives of regular verb stems, and the agreement of adjectives and nouns. Includes short stories about the culture of Israel. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL intermediate mid competencies.

Prerequisite: HEB 101 with a grade of “C” or higher or demonstrated proficiency.

Lab fee: $40.

 

HEB 203

Intermediate Hebrew I

3 credit hours

Continued study of Modern Israeli Hebrew with intensive oral work, grammar, and composition. Builds on HEB 102 adding the past tense of verbs in all stems, and pronominal suffixes. Readings include stories about the history and culture of Israel and verses from the Hebrew Bible. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL intermediate high competencies.

Prerequisite: Proficiency examination or HEB 102 with a grade of “C” or higher.

Lab fee: $40.

 

HEB 204

Intermediate Hebrew II

3 credit hours

Intensive practical conversational workshop. Covers most activities listed in the ACTFL intermediate high competencies.

Prerequisite: HEB 203 with a grade of “C” or higher.

 

HEB 301

Hebrew Conversation/Grammar

3 credit hours

Advanced practice in understanding and speaking Israeli Hebrew and in increasing reading skills. The course is based on the achievement of structural analysis of the Hebrew language, which necessarily includes a concentration on grammar and identification of words not only by their characters but also by clues provided.

Prerequisite: HEB 204.

 

HEB 302

Hebrew Composition

3 credit hours

Development of writing through practical compositional exercises that include a review of grammar. Developing proficiency in reading skills with selected readings.

Prerequisite: HEB 204 or equivalent.

 

HEB 305

Hebrew Culture and Civilization

3 credit hours

A study of the historical, political, and cultural developments of the state of Israel with emphasis on Judaism and Judeo/Christian relations. (Taught in English.)

Prerequisite: HEB 204 or equivalent

 

HEB 451

Special Readings

1-3 credit hours

Special readings course in Hebrew to cover general or specific areas as determined by the professor to meet the need of the student.

Restrictions: Arrangement with professor, departmental permission, and proficiency as needed.

 

HEB 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

History (HIS)

 

HIS 101

American History Survey

3 credit hours

An introduction of the main political, economic, social, foreign policy, and cultural developments in American history since 1760. Students develop a personal synthesis of American history. (Honors sections are available for this course.)

 

HIS 201

Historiography

3 credit hours

An introductory course for history and prelaw majors, focusing upon the student as the central figure for “building history from the ground up.” Participants are introduced to the discipline of history and to the historian’s craft. Special attention is given to the vocational potential of the history major and to the relationship between the field of history and law.

 

HIS 310

Oklahoma History

3 credit hours

A survey of cultural, economic, political, and social development of Oklahoma as a reflection of similar development throughout the American West. This course is designed to study how Oklahoma is affected by and affects the national scene.

 

HIS 323

The Middle Ages and the Reformation, 476 to 1650

3 credit hours

An examination of the religious, social, political, and economic aspects of the times from the fall of Rome to the Reformation throughout Europe. Focuses on the Christian, historical, and philosophical continuity and disparity that gave rise to the Renaissance, Reformation, and Counter-Reformation. Emphasizes the development and significance of the establishment of religious toleration.

 

HIS 324

Modern Europe, 1815 to Present

3 credit hours

An intensive study of Europe from 1815 to the present. Emphasizes those aspects of European civilization that led to the success of liberalism in some areas and failure in others and the developments that resulted in World War I, World War II, the dismantling of colonialism, the Cold War, and the European Union. Covers main historical themes and events and gives attention to subjects of less significance to Europe, such as Europe’s role in the Middle East.

 

HIS 340

Colonial America to Early National, 1607 to 1830

3 credit hours

Designed to give the student of American history and culture a background for study of later eras of the nation's development. Focuses on the transportation of English culture to the eastern frontier of the New World during the 17th and 18th centuries. Presents the roles that French and Spanish civilizations played in forging the new Anglo-American character. Includes the Revolution, the formation of the Constitution, and the first decades of the young American nation as it created its own identity.

 

HIS 343

Civil War and Reconstruction U.S., 1830 to 1877

3 credit hours

A study of the political, social, economic, and intellectual roots of the Civil War; the war itself, and the period of Reconstruction during the decade following the war.

 

HIS 344

Early Modern United States, 1877 to 1929: Gilded Age to World War I

3 credit hours

An analysis of the foundations of the 20th-century United States. Includes the pre-eminence of big business, subordination of politics, reform movements and organization of labor, the impact of urbanization and immigration, agriculture and the completion of Manifest Destiny, cultural and intellectual trends and foreign affairs, the Progressive movement, international affairs and World War I, and economic and social trends of the twenties.

 

HIS 345

United States Since 1929

3 credit hours

A study of the New Deal and World War II, international politics and the Cold War, recent domestic politics, cultural and intellectual trends, and the U.S. in global perspective.

 

HIS 351

Evangelical and Charismatic Christianity in America

3 credit hours

Explores the roots of evangelical, Pentecostal, and charismatic Christianity in America and traces the development of these movements up to the present. Emphasizes the Wesleyan revivals; the late-nineteenth-century holiness and Pentecostal movements in the American South; and the twentieth-century emergence of fundamentalism, neo-evangelicalism, the religious right, and the charismatic movement.

 

HIS 361

Colonial Latin America

3 credit hours

An examination of the pre-Columbian cultures of the New World as well as the Spanish influence on them through discovery and conquest. Emphasizes the clash of cultures and the establishment of Spanish religious, social, and governmental patterns relevant to today. (Cross listed with SPA 315.)

 

HIS 362

Survey of Latin America

3 credit hours

A survey of the history of Latin America from the pre-Columbian period to the present. Presents an overview of the religious, cultural, political, and social institutions that make Latin America a unique region. (Cross listed with SPA 315.)

 

HIS 371

Islamic Middle East

3 credit hours

Explores the development of Islam and its influence on the history of the Middle East to 1798 and the invasion of Egypt by Napoleon. The first part of the course focuses on Muhammad and Islam, with all its tenets and sects.

 

HIS 372

Ancient Near East

3 credit hours

Charts the history of the Ancient Near East from the dawn of history—the beginning of writing—until the Persian Period. Includes the history of Israel, especially connections between Israel and her Old World neighbors. Focuses on the ancient kingdoms and peoples who made up the world of the Bible. Includes a discussion of the rediscovery of these antiquities, including the development of archaeology, the deciphering of languages, and the great finds and sites.

 

HIS 381

Modern China and Japan

3 credit hours

A survey of the influence of the ancient past of China, Japan, and the East Asian area in the 20th century. Major themes include Christian missions and China and Japan’s political, religious, and cultural past and present.

 

HIS 382

History of India and Southeast Asia

3 credit hours

A survey of the influence of the ancient past of India and Southeast Asia in the 20th century. Major themes include the European colonial legacy, nationalism, religion, Christian missions history, and recent developments.

 

HIS 425

Eastern European History

3 credit hours

Covers the history of Russia 1700-1917, the Soviet State 1917-1991, and eastern and central Europe. Emphasizes the spread of Marxism in the bacground and events of the 1917 revolutions, the establishment of the Soviet regime, the period of Nazism, and the evolution of the Communist Parties and the societies throughout the European Communist Block.

 

HIS 464

The Caribbean, Mexico, and Central America

3 credit hours

Examines issues in Latin American history and culture and emphasizes student research. An examination of the history of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean from pre-Columbian times until the present. (Cross listed with SPA 315.)

 

HIS 472

Twentieth Century Middle East

3 credit hours

Details the development of the nations of the Middle East from World War I to the present. Gives particular attention to the wars in the region and the strategic geo-political significance.

 

HIS 473

The Rise of Modern Israel

3 credit hours

Examines the history of the modern state of Israel from the appearance of modern Zionism to the present. Emphasizes the Arab-Israeli conflict and the wars in the regions.

 

HIS 477

Secondary Methods: Social Studies

3 credit hours

A course designed to prepare social studies education students with ideas and practical knowledge for the classroom. Focuses on materials and methods of teaching social studies core disciplines (history, government, geography) to middle and high school students. Includes materials and methods of teaching the related disciplines of economics, psychology, sociology, and anthropology.

 

HIS 479

Readings in History

3 credit hours

Special studies in history. Covers general or specific areas to meet student needs. Topics vary.

Restrictions: Instructor permission and approval of the department chair.

 

HIS 483

Contemporary Asia, 1945 to Present

3 credit hours

A study of 20th and 21st century Asian history that has led to the present growth, issues, and concerns. Included are the regions from India, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and western Russia to East Asia, Southeast Asia, Australia, and New Zealand. Covers political, societal, economical, cultural, and religious changes in light of modern and post-modern thought that have affected this area and conversely how Asia has affected and will continue to affect the world in the future. Includes Christian missions history.

 

HIS 490

Department Seminar

3 credit hours

Focuses on topics and geographic areas not covered in other courses. Topics may include women’s history, African history, and history of the American presidency. Seminar emphasizes student research.

 

HIS 491

History Internship

3 credit hours

An internship in a local, state, national, or international organization that is devoted to the study of historical research, writing, and practical experience.

Restrictions: Permission of instructor; senior standing.

 

HIS 499

Senior Paper/Project

3 credit hours

A refresher course in research methods and in writing and critiquing research papers. Requires a 20-25 page historical research paper.

 

HIS 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Honors (HONR)

 

HONR 100

Freshman Honors Seminar

0 credit hour

Introduces first year honors students to the honors community at ORU. Seminar topics are selected to help expose new students to important issues such as scholarship, leadership, service learning, and prestigious scholarships. Includes a variety of activities, talks led by faculty and student leaders in the honors program, and small group discussion.

Restriction: Honors Fellow or Scholar standing.

 

HONR 101

Artistic Expression

3 credit hours

An interdisciplinary seminar in literature and art. Explores major developments in literature and the visual arts. Written and visual materials illustrate the ways that literature and art have converged and diverged in response to changes in worldview. Students use critical thinking and writing skills to evaluate the effects of shifts in the form and content of one medium on the other and the impact of those shifts on western culture. (This course substitutes for COMP 102 or HUM 250).

Restriction: Honors Fellow or Scholar standing.

 

HONR 102

Philosophy of Science

3 credit hours

A basic study of the philosophy of science, which includes a general understanding of philosophy and its impact on the natural sciences. Emphasizes the science and philosophy of origins, scientific ethics, Western scientific thought and its impact on Christian thought and practice, and formulation of a charismatic, evangelical response and perspective on the Western scientific enterprise. (This course substitutes for HUM 244.)

Restriction: Honors Fellow or Scholar standing or theological-historical studies major with a Christian philosophy concentration or science education major.

 

HONR 201

Principles of Leadership

3 credit hours

An overview of the art and science of leadership and leadership development. Examines research-based models of interdisciplinary leadership and leadership development through reading, reflection, interaction, collaboration, team work, and problem solving. Emphasis is on understanding and developing emotionally intelligent leadership. (This course substitutes for the social sciences elective for general education.)

Restriction: Honors Fellow or Scholar standing.

 

HONR 202

History of Quantitative Thought

3 credit hours

An interdisciplinary course in mathematics and history. Explores the history of mathematics from ancient Greek and Babylonian periods to the dawn of modern mathematics (3000 B.C.-1600 A.D.). Explores the historical and cultural connections between mathematical innovations and the ambient social and philosophical climates in which they were developed. (This course substitutes for HUM 233.)

Restriction: Honors Fellow or Scholar standing.

 

HONR 301

Faith and Civilization in Context

3 credit hours

An interdisciplinary seminar in humanities and theology. Explores the various stages of Western civilization from the Roman Empire to the present and the impact and influence of the Christian faith upon it. (This course substitutes for HUM 222.)

Restriction: Honors Fellow or Scholar standing.

 

HONR 303

Science and the Imagination

3 credit hours

Examines the relationship of science and science fiction from a historical and critical viewpoint. Through lecture and discussion, students learn how science and science fiction influence each other. Students respond to readings through class discussion and appropriate writing. (This course substitutes for COMP 303.)

Restrictions: Honors Fellow or Scholar; sophomore standing or higher.

 

 

Health and Physical education (HPE)

 

HPE 001

Health Fitness I

1 credit hour

Designed to develop an understanding of and personal appreciation for the relationship of physical activity and fitness to health. Emphasizes the concepts of health fitness through the conditioning of the cardiorespiratory system and the development of a healthy lifestyle. Includes consumer health information and a required weekly physical activity lab.

Prerequisite: Medical Assessment.

Course Fee: $15.

 

HPE 002

Health Fitness II

1 credit hour

A continuation of Health Fitness 001 course with an emphasis on total body health fitness. Focus areas include cardiorespiratory fitness, nutrition, body composition, musculo-skeletal fitness, and stress management. Includes consumer health information and a required weekly physical activity lab.

Prerequisite: HPE 001.

Course fee: $15.

 

HPE 003-150

0.5-1 credit hour

A variety of activity courses, such as swimming, tennis, and backpacking. (An activity class may be taken only twice for credit.)

General Education Physical Activity Courses
HPE 003 Total Conditioning**
HPE 005 Fitness Club**
HPE 007 Basic First Aid and CPR and Fitness**
HPE 012 Bowling and Fitness
HPE 016 Beginning Badminton and Fitness**
HPE 017 Advanced Badminton and Fitness**
HPE 020 Beginning Golf and Fitness
HPE 021 Advanced Golf and Fitness
HPE 024 Intermediate Swimming and Fitness**
HPE 025 Aquatic Exercises**
HPE 026 Beginning Swimming and Fitness**
HPE 027 Swim Conditioning**
HPE 028 Beginning Tennis and Fitness**
HPE 029 Intermediate/Adv Tennis and Fitness**
HPE 030 Weight Training and Fitness**
HPE 031 Advanced Weight Training and Fitness**
HPE 036 Scuba and Fitness**
HPE 037 Scuba Rescue and Fitness**
HPE 038 Scuba Open Water and Fitness**
HPE 039 Scuba Master Diver and Fitness**
HPE 040 Advanced Scuba and Fitness**
HPE 042 Creative Aerobics and Fitness**
HPE 044 Step Aerobics and Fitness**
HPE 045 Pilates for Christians and Fitness**
HPE 046 Equestrian and Fitness
HPE 047 Intermediate Equestrian and Fitness
HPE 051 Volleyball and Fitness**
HPE 053 Intermediate/Advanced Volleyball and Fitness**
HPE 054 Racquetballand Fitness**
HPE 080 Adaptive Physical Education**
HPE 084 Self-Defense and Fitness**
HPE 092 Exercise and Weight Control**
HPE 093 Body Sculpting and Fitness**
HPE 095 Beginning Mountain Biking and Fitness**
HPE 096 Intermediate/Advanced Mountain Biking and Fitness**
HPE 097 Backpacking and Fitness
HPE 098 Triathlon Training**
HPE 099 Aerobics Proficiency**
HPE 100 Walk for Fitness**
HPE 101 Fitness for Life I**
HPE 102 Fitness for Life II**
HPE 124 Lifeguarding and Fitness**

  

Varsity*
HPE 034 Varsity Cheerleading and Fitness*
HPE 070 Varsity Basketball
HPE 071 Varsity Tennis
HPE 072 Varsity Baseball
HPE 073 Varsity Golf
HPE 075 Varsity Track and Field
HPE 076 Varsity Volleyball
HPE 079 Varsity Soccer

Prerequisites: GEN 150, HPE 001,  GHPE 503/703 and passing of the swimming proficiency.

Course fees: Backpacking, $60; golf, equestrian, and bowling have fees that are subject to change.

*Additional prerequisites need to be met.

**Course fee: $15.00

HPE 171 DISCOVERING HEALTH FITNESS I

This course is designed for the adult learner and seeks to develop an understanding of, and personal appreciation for, the relationship of physical activity and fitness to health. Emphasizes the concept of health fitness through the conditioning of the cardiorespiratory system and the development of a healthy lifestyle. Includes consumer health information and a required weekly physical activity lab. This course is for online programs only.

Prerequisite: Medical Assessment.

HPE 172 DISCOVERING HEALTH FITNESS Ii

A continuation of Discovering Health Fitness I with emphasis on total body health fitness for the adult learner.  Focus areas include cardiorespiratory fitness, nutrition, body composition, musculoskeletal fitness, and stress management.  Includes consumer health information and a required weekly physical activity lab. This course is for online programs only.

Prerequisite:  LHPE 171.

  

Health, leisure and sport sciences (Hlss)

 

HLSS 200

Introduction to Exercise Science and Physical Education

3 credit hours

A study of the basic concepts and principles that form the foundation of health, exercise science, and physical education. Designed to acquaint the student with the organized body of knowledge in the disciplines while exploring different career options and issues in the discipline.

 

HLSS 202

Introduction to Leisure Science

3 credit hours

The study of leisure with an emphasis on the role of leisure and recreation in American culture. Includes the relationships of leisure with religion, family life, business, employment, environmental concerns, and political/governmental issues.

 

HLSS 206

Introduction to Sports Management

3 credit hours

An overview of the field of sports management. Covers the types of careers, training, experiences, course of study, as well as characteristics of a successful sports manager.

 

HLSS 228

Theory of Coaching

2 credit hours

Provides the foundation for coaching sports at any level. Discusses differences in the levels of competitive sport, emphasizes professional and personal development, and offers methods for constructing plans for meeting coaching goals.

 

HLSS 231

Personal Health Science

3 credit hours

A study of critical personal health topics including drugs, mental health, stress management, smoking, alcohol, cancer, cardiovascular disease, nutrition, and weight management.

 

HLSS 233

Safety and First Aid

3 credit hours

A study of accident prevention and personal safety. Includes practicing immediate first aid treatment. May earn American Red Cross Standard First Aid and CPR certificates.

 

HLSS 306

Sports Facility and Event Management

3 credit hours

Develops practical competencies necessary to effectively manage sporting facilities and events. Includes theoretical discussions and hands-on experience.

  

HLSS 314

Motor Learning, Games, and Adaptive PE

3 credit hours

Develops a knowledge of motor learning, elementary games, and activities essential to the growth and development of the elementary age child. Discusses knowledge, skills, and techniques for instruction in a variety of activities. Provides practicum experiences to enhance and reinforce class learning.

 

HLSS 315

Organization and Administration of Programs

3 credit hours

Equips the student with a series of management, promotion, and other administrative tools necessary to successfully operate health and/or recreational facilities and programs. Presents design, implementation, evaluation, and problem-solving for health spas, recreation complexes, corporate fitness centers, and hospital wellness programs.

 

HLSS 316

Kinesiology and Biomechanics

3 credit hours

An applied study of human performance, including musculoskeletal actions, analysis of sports skills, and training and conditioning techniques, with application of mechanical laws and principles to basic performance patterns.

Prerequisites: HLSS 319; or PHS 223 and 224.

 

HLSS 318

Psychology of Human Performance

3 credit hours

Designed to provide preparation essential for the students’ of the psychology of sport. Discusses psychological variables affecting motivation, anxiety, aggression, skill acquisition, and self-confidence.

 

HLSS 319

Applied Anatomy and Physiology

4 credit hours

A study of gross structure and physiology of the human body. Includes the following systems: skeletal, muscular, articular, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, and endocrine. Explores the interplay of structure and function necessary in promoting efficient human movement. Examines the effects of exercise on each of the body’s systems. Includes a weekly 3-hour lab.

 

HLSS 320

Prevention and Care of Sports Injuries

3 credit hours

A course designed for prospective coaches, trainers, and health and physical educators to aid them in the prevention, recognition, evaluation, and care of athletic injuries. Lecture and lab sessions focus on taping methods and the rehabilitation of injuries.

Recommended prerequisites: HLSS 319; or PHS 223 and 224.

 

HLSS 324

Exercise Physiology

3 credit hours

A study of the physiological bases of muscular activity with special attention to general effects of exercise on body function. Includes the properties of muscles; physiological effects of muscular exercise, physical conditioning, and training; the significance of these effects for health and performance; and an analysis of physical fitness.

Prerequisites: HLSS 319; or PHS 223 and 224.

 

HLSS 331

Outdoor Leisure and Camps

3 credit hours

Explores the use of outdoor areas for recreation as well as the local, state, and federal government’s involvement in parks, playgrounds, and outdoor recreation. Also discusses organization, administration, programming, and staffing for camps.

 

HLSS 343

Leadership in Sports and Leisure

3 credit hours

An examination of the recreational activities pertinent to schools, camps, recreation centers, and churches. Discusses the leadership role of the recreation director in supervising and directing volunteers and other personnel in the recreation program.

 

HLSS 344

Programming in Sport and Leisure

3 credit hours

A study of the various recreational programs and the methods of delivering those programs to the community. Includes a discussion of a wide range of sports, social, educational, personality enrichment, and human-service program. Also discusses the key stages of program development.

 

HLSS 353-360

Theory and Analysis of Teaching Sports and Physical Activities

2 credit hours each

Courses designed to provide preparation essential for the instruction of activities in the physical education and recreation setting. Emphasizes instructional methods, analysis of skill movements, and group organization.

HLSS 353 Soccer/Volleyball

HLSS 354 Track and Field/Weight Training

HLSS 356 Aquatics

HLSS 357 Football/Badminton

HLSS 358 Golf

HLSS 359 Tennis/Pickleball

HLSS 360 Softball/Basketball

 

HLSS 375

Global Perspectives in Leisure and Sports Management

3 credit hours

This course focuses on the impact of contemporary global challenges on the leisure and sports management industry.

 

HLSS 402

Exercise Prescription for Special Populations

3 credit hours

A study of the aerobics concept of conditioning, with special emphasis upon the cardiorespiratory system and the relationship between lifestyle and the risk factors of heart disease. Students learn to write exercise prescriptions to maintain health and fitness for various populations (normal, young, rehabilitation, geriatric, etc.).

Prerequisite: HLSS 324.

Course fee: $100.

 

HLSS 412

Techniques of Health Fitness Evaluation

3 credit hours

A thorough analysis of evaluating an individual’s strength, muscular endurance, cardiorespiratory fitness, flexibility, body composition, and nutritional status. Provides lab practice in the assessment of health fitness with a focus on preparing students for personal training, physical therapy, and sports medicine careers.

Prerequisite: HLSS 324.

Course fee: 100.

 

HLSS 416

Legal and Ethical Aspects of Sport and Leisure

3 credit hours

Introduces sport management students to basic legal and ethical principles. Covers legal basics, including contract law principles, general tort theories, general criminal law practices, fundamentals of Title IX, relevant disability-related statutes, antitrust and labor issues in sport, intellectual property issues in sport, and religious issues related to sport. Includes ethical concepts and theories and provides a background for making ethical decisions.

 

HLSS 451

Directed Study

1-3 credit hours

The study of an approved topic, project, or practicum. Intended to supplement a subject already studied in an HPE class or to allow investigation of another subject or experience not addressed in a formal HLSS class.

Restriction: HLSS major.

 

HLSS 452

HPE Methods and Evaluation

3 credit hours

A course designed for future physical education teachers to develop knowledge in the areas of curriculum development, methods of teaching, techniques of measurement and evaluation, and organizing instruction for the elementary and secondary physical education programs. Focuses on applying contemporary theories and practices to the context of elementary, intermediate, and secondary schools. Includes teaching processes that involve philosophy, motor learning, planning, organizing, presenting materials, evaluating, and reading current professional literature.

 

HLSS 481

Internship in Health and Exercise Science

2-12 credit hours

Involvement in organizing and administering health fitness and physical therapy programs in one of several settings: health clubs, YMCAs or YWCAs, corporations, and medical facilities. (Credit varies according to the internship. The HLSS Department chair and the student’s advisor approve the number of credit hours.)

Prerequisites: HLSS 324 and 412.

Restrictions: HES major or minor and senior status.

 

HLSS 482

Internship in Leisure Science

2-5 credit hours

Involvement in organizing and administering recreation-oriented programs in one of several settings: YMCAs or YWCAs, communities, schools, and recreation centers. (Credit varies according to the internship. The HLSS Department chair and the student’s advisor approve the number of credit hours.)

Prerequisites: HLSS 343 and 344.

Restrictions: Leisure science major or minor and senior status.

 

HLSS 483

Internship in Sport Management

3 credit hours

Intensive involvement within a sport organization (professional, collegiate, national, or global) that offers students opportunities to observe, assist, and/or direct events in the sport management field. (Credit varies according to the internship. The HLSS department chair and the student’s advisor approve the number of credit hours.)

Restrictions: Sport management major or minor; senior status.

 

HLSS 499

Senior Paper/Project

3 credit hours

A well-written research paper or project that fulfills a senior capstone experience.

Restrictions: Senior standing in an HLSS Department major.

 

HLSS 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Humanities (HUM)

 

 

HUM 103

Christian Worldview and Culture

3 credit hours

An examination of the history, nature, and function of worldviews and their effect on culture. This course focuses upon developing a distinct Christian worldview based upon foundational Biblical themes such as creation, humanity fashioned in God’s image, sin and the fall of man, evil, redemption, and restoration. Compares and contrasts various worldviews and religions using the philosophical categories of metaphysics and epistemology. Surveys shifts in worldviews over time and teaches practical Christian apologetics as a response to these changes.

 

HUM 222

Ancient and Medieval Humanities

3 credit hours

A historical survey and worldview synthesis emphasizing philosophical, religious, political, economic, artistic, and aesthetic developments of human culture and civilization from the dawn of history to 1400 A.D. Focuses on the ancient world, Greece, and the classical past of the Western world, the Roman Empire, and Medieval Europe.

 

HUM 233

Renaissance and Enlightenment Humanities

3 credit hours

A historical survey and worldview synthesis emphasizing philosophical, religious, political, economic, artistic, and aesthetic developments of human culture and civilization from 1400 to 1800 A.D. Focuses on the Renaissance, the Reformation and Counter-Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, Western exploration and expansion, the Enlightenment, and the American Revolution.

 

HUM 244

Romantic and Modern Humanities

3 credit hours

A historical survey and worldview synthesis emphasizing philosophical, religious, political, economic, artistic, and aesthetic developments of human culture and civilization from 1800 to the present. Focuses on the Modern world, including Romanticism, the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, World Wars and conflicts, globalization, and the emergent Post-Modern culture.

 

HUM 250

Art History Survey I

3 credit hours

A study of the world arts, artists, and their cultures from prehistoric times through the Gothic Period. (Cross listed with ART 103.)

Course fee: $15.

 

HUM 255

Art History Survey II

3 credit hours

A study of world painting, sculpture, and architecture from the birth of the Italian Renaissance through the eighteenth century. (Cross listed with ART 104.)

Course fee: $15.

 

HUM 260

Music Appreciation

3 credit hours

A non-technical course aimed at increasing the enjoyment and appreciation of music by the listener with little or no previous music background. Includes a brief survey of music history and the basic principles of music form as illustrated by masterworks. (Cross listed with MUS 300.)

 

HUM 270

Introduction to Theatre

3 credit hours

A study of the various elements and functions of theatre in society. Focuses on becoming an intelligent artistic critic and evaluating art from a Christian perspective. Provides the student with an overall introduction to the theatre arts. Includes theatre as an art form, the basic elements of a play, the role of the critic, the audience, the scene designer, the director, the customer, and the director. Places special emphasis on developing evaluative skills while watching theatre. (Cross listed with DRAM 215.)

 

HUM 300

Cultural Periods

3 credit hours

An analysis of the range of cultural expressions in a designated time period. Examples include “The Ancient World, 2000 B.C. to A.D. 400”; “Comparative Culture, 1650 to 1800”; and “Immediate Precedents, and Developments from 1918 to 1960.”

 

HUM 333

Humanities Travel Studies

3 credit hours

Foreign travel with humanities faculty or with other pre-approved trips abroad that provide first-hand encounters with the culture and history of a nation or region of the world. Students visit historic sites and hear lectures explaining the history, geography, literature, and art of each region they visit. Includes pre-travel cultural studies as well as post-travel writing assignments that include selected readings from the departmental humanities textbook.

 

HUM 350

Area Studies

3 credit hours

A survey of the culture of a specific world region. Examples are “Islamic Culture, A.D. 600 to the present”; “Latin America, Civilization, and Culture”; and “Africa, Precolonial Civilizations to Modern Nationhood.” (Honors sections are available.)

 

HUM 400

Major Figures

3 credit hours

A study of great human beings, so called because they are human definitions and expositions of great ideas and spiritual insights. Students learn to view people who fit this mold as an integration of vital humanities patterns.

 

HUM 450

Thematic Readings

3 credit hours

Topics relevant to civilization and the nature of human experience across time and cultures. Examples include “Nationalism and National Conflict” and “Humanism, Scientism, and Modern Society.”

 

HUM 490

Integrative Seminar

3 credit hours

The humanities minor capstone course. Focuses on evaluating the meaning of contemporary human experiences and integrating historical, philosophical, theological, aesthetic, social-political, and economic aspects as appropriate.

 

HUM 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Information technology (it)

 

IT 101

Information Technology Fundamentals

3 credit hours

An introduction to Information Technology (IT) and the various components and applications that have led the discipline to its current state. Topics focus on the convergence of computing and IT, the role of IT in contemporary global organizations, and the numerous domains of application (e.g. business, education, government, and healthcare).

 

IT 111

Programming

3 credit hours

An overview of programming basics in IT to include data structures, programming constructs, algorithms and problem-solving, object-oriented and event-driven programming, and recursion.

 

IT 201

Human Computer Interaction

3 credit hours

An introduction to Human Computer Interaction (HCI). Includes human factors, HCI aspects of application domains, human-centered evaluation, developing effective interfaces, accessibility, emerging technologies, human-centered software development.

Prerequisite: IT 111 or IT 231.

 

IT 211

Networking

3 credit hours

An introduction to networking and related knowledge areas (e.g. data communication, telecommunications, inter/intranetworking, and infrastructure security) associated with organizational computer networks and communication infrastructures. Topics include routing and switching, switching, physical layer, security, and related application areas.

Prerequisite: IT 101.

 

IT 231

Web Systems/Technologies

3 credit hours

Addresses web systems and technologies and covers how web-based applications (e.g. databases, interfaces and digital media, and software) are designed, implemented, and tested. Includes information architecture, digital media, web development and vulnerabilities of web systems.

Prerequisite: IT 111.

 

IT 251

Technical and Professional Communication

3 credit hours

Addresses professional and technical communications to lay the foundation for strong professional practices. Topics include teamwork concepts, group dynamics, leadership styles, technical writing and documentation, presentation development and delivery.

Prerequisite: COMP 303.

 

IT 301

Information Management

3 credit hours

An overview of databases and information management. Includes query languages, data organization architecture, data modeling, managing the database environment and special-purpose databases.

Prerequisite: IT 111.

 

IT 361

System Administration and Maintenance

3 credit hours

Addresses system administration and maintenance as well as platform technologies. Topics include operating systems, applications, administrative activities and domains, computer architecture and organization, and computing infrastructures.

Prerequisite: IT 111.

 

IT 371

Integrative Programming

3 credit hours

An overview of integrative programming as related to applications and systems. Includes inter-systems communication, data mapping and exchange, integrative coding, scripting techniques, software security, and an overview of programming languages.

Prerequisite: IT 301 or IT 361.

 

IT 411

Information Assurance and Security

3 credit hours

Addresses Information Assurance and Security (IAS). Covers fundamental aspects, security mechanism, operational issues, policy, attacks, security domains, forensics, information states, security services, threat analysis, and vulnerabilities.

Prerequisite: IT 231 or IT 301.

 

IT 451

Project Management

3 credit hours

Addresses the skills necessary to initiate, plan, execute, monitor and control, and close IT projects. The CompTIA Project+ certification validates the business, interpersonal and technical project management skills required to manage projects and initiatives.

Prerequisite: IT 371.

 

IT 499

IT Capstone

3 credit hours

IT senior project including proposal, feasibility studies, intellectual property, teamwork, budgets, schedule management; professional communications (reports and presentations), design implementation, and testing.

Prerequisite: Completion of 10 of the 11 courses required in major.

Restriction: Senior standing.

 

 

Interactive media (int)

 

INT 101

Digital Composition

3 credit hours

An introductory course covering the basic principles of design on a 2D image, digital photography, the use of DSLR cameras and basic Photoshop. Final projects are photojournalist, visual story-telling images that demonstrate technical knowledge, and artistic competence.

Course fee: $40.

 

INT 200

Interactive Media/Web Design

3 credit hours

Designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of interactive media systems and web design principles.

Course fee: $40

 

INT 202

Introduction to 3-D and Animation

3 credit hours

Provides a general overview of principles related to animation and 3-D computer graphics. Focuses on modeling, texturing, and animating simple objects.

 

INT 212

Workshop: Interactive Media

1-3 credit hours

Experience in reporting, writing, and posting breaking news and features as well as photos and video for the online Website associated with ORU Student Publications. Students are assigned a beat and work as a team to produce campus news coverage as part of a 24/7 operation. (May be repeated for credit.)

 

INT 302

Advanced 3-D and Animation

3 credit hours

Provides an advanced overview of principles related to animation and 3-D computer graphics. Improves student ability to model, texture, and animate objects as they learn advanced techniques related to topics such as layout customization, lighting, hypervoxels, surfacing, skelgons and other issues.

  

INT 401

Advanced Interactive Media

3 credit hours

Introduces students to methods and tools required to produce computer-based interactive media such as CD ROMs, the web and an introduction to DVDs. Emphasizes hands-on mini-projects that require the use of authoring, video, graphics and audio editing software. Principal tools include Macromedia Director/ Flash/Dreamweaver, Adobe Premiere/After Effects/ Photoshop/Illustrator software.

Restriction: Instructor’s permission.

Course fee: $40.

 

INT 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

INTERpreting (INTr)

 

INTR 321

Beginning Interpreting

3 credit hours

A comprehensive study of interpreting at the introductory level between English and the foreign language, including on-site interpreting and short consecutive interpreting. Topics include medical and religious vocabulary used in various scenarios. Attention is fiven to moral and ethical concerns related to interpreting.

Prerequisite: TRNS 310.

 

INTR 331

Intermediate Interpreting

3 credit hours

Further development of skills in consecutive interpreting between English and the foreign language. Introduction to simultaneous interpreting. Topics include government, science and legal interpreting.

Prerequisite: INTR 321.

 

INTR 441

Advanced Interpreting

3 credit hours

Advanced practice in short and long consecutive interpreting between English and the foreign language with an increased focus on simultaneous interpreting. Course material covers a wide range of fields from real-world situations.

Prerequisite: INTR 331.

 

 

International Studies (IS)

 

IS 301

Global Perspectives in the Modern World

3 credit hours

A study of the Christian worldview and how it should form the conceptual foundation for human thought and action within a culture of competing worldviews. In a time of growing anti-intellectualism in the Church and marginalization of Christianity in society, this course provides the understanding necessary to effectively communicate the truth of Christianity so that society can be transformed. Addresses practical application of Biblical principles to current cultural issues. (Cross listed with GCSE 511.)

 

IS 340

Needs Assessment

3 credit hours

Focuses on the elements and processes of needs assessments of communities or business organizations. The needs assessment process includes (1) identifying various stakeholders within the needs of the communities and organziations, (2) identifying the various needs of the communities and organizations; (3) prioritizing the needs of the communities and/or organizations and (4) finding solutions to fill the gap between the existing needs and the desired goal. Students gain experience and skills in needs assessment methodologies, needs analysiss and reporting methods.

 

IS 341

Program Evaluation

3 credit hours

This course will allow review of successful programs in progress or accomplished that use appropriate techniques. Program review should include analysis of the kind of data generated to prioritize needs, select design, and implment a solution strategy. Further, the course focuses attention on the practical requirements of developing social programs to address the identified needs.

Prerequisite: IS 340.

 

IS 350

Internship in International Studies

3-12 credit hours

A supervised, on-the-job experience with an approved business, industry, government, or mission agency. The intern puts into practice the skills and knowledge gained from the chosen areas of concentration. May be done in the U.S. or abroad.

 

IS 361

Foundations of International/ Community Development

3 credit hours

Provides an overview of International/Community development as a profession. Emphasizes the integration of knowledge from many disciplines such as economics, sociology, missions, and politics. Demonstrates how theory, research, teaching, and practice are important and interdependent functions that are vital in the public and private sectors.

 

IS 365

Disaster Relief

3 credit hours

The central focus of this course is three fold, (1) Identifying the natural, human and technological causes of national and international disasters, (2) introducing students to the steps in disaster management cycle which include mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, (3) introducing international protocols and provisions that guide conducts of disaster relief organizations both national and international in nature.

 

IS 370

Problems in International/Community Development

3 credit hours

Directed independent research on a contemporary problem or topic in international studies and community development. This course is offered by arrangement with a faculty member in international studies. A written report and/or an oral presentation are required.

 

IS 391

Seminar in International/Community Development

3 credit hours

In-depth studies of the various areas of ministry and opportunities in international/community development, including a survey of current needs around the world.

 

IS 440

Global Perspectives

3 credit hours

A thematic course designed to address various contemporary global concerns. Topics may include--but are not limited to--population growth and migration, poverty and economic development, women’s issues, conflict and weapons proliferation, globalization and international trade, human rights, and nationalism and ethnic conflict.

 

IS 460

Conflict Analysis and Resolution

3 credit hours

Aims at introducing the students to the root causes of intrastate and interstate conflicts. The course identifies state and non-state actors in national, regional and international conflicts. Significant emphasis is placed on the nature and dynamics of recent conflcts that grabbed many developing states. The course introduces skills in analyzing the root causes of conflicts as well as mechanisms of conflict resolutions and management.

 

IS 462

Needs Assessment and Program Evaluation

3 credit hours

Focuses on the elements and processes of needs assessments, program planning and development, proposal writing, and program evaluation. Students gain experience and skills by developing and writing a funding proposal.

 

IS 499

Senior Seminar and Paper

3 credit hours

A capstone course required of all ICD seniors. Contains two distinct phases: directed individual research and writing of the senior paper and the planning, preparing, and delivery of a seminar presentation. Students eligible for graduation honors must complete a successful oral defense of the senior paper before a faculty committee.

Prerequisite: IS 350.

 

IS 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

JOURNALISM (JRN)

 

JRN 101

Introduction to Journalism

3 credit hours

This course offers students the opportunity to gain insight into the diverse opportunities in convergence journalism with this seminar class covering all the various facets of media and career paths available to the 21st century journalist. An introductory course held in the ORU Global Learning Center so that various guest speakers who are news media professionals can address and interact with students via live internet feed. Topics covered incude a broad media industry overview that includes print, TV, radio, Internet, film and social media based journalism, a survey of journalism ethics and media law, best industry practices, the importance of incorporating Christian worldview, a global focus, and critical thinking in news gathering, and producing, research strategies and professional formation. Course utilizes Launch Pad Solo in addition to a conventional text book for the purpose of an interactive classroom learning experience.

Course fee: $40.

 
JRN 107

Newswriting I

3 credit hours

Introduces students to newspaper, reporting, and writing.

Corequisite: JRN 108.

Course fee: $20.

 

JRN 108

Newswriting I Lab

1 credit hour

A study of the Associated Press Stylebook for use in editing copy for all forms of media.

Prerequisite or corequisite: JRN 107.

 

JRN 207

Convergence Newswriting

3 credit hours

A course developing developing convergent newsgathering skills and journalistic values across all forms of media while helping the student gain a more advanced understanding of the forms, processes and thinking required to gather and present compelling news content.

Prerequisites: JRN 107, JRN 108 and typing ability .

Course fee: $20.

 

JRN 214

Workshop: Newspaper

1-3 credit hours

Provides indepth experience in various aspects of newspaper journalism on the ORU campus under the guidance and critical evaluation of a professor or advisor associated with The Oracle, the ORU student newspaper. Students are involved in the production of articles for The Oracle and/or in the editorial or business management of the publication. (May be repeated for credit.)

Prerequisites: JRN 107 and JRN 108 .

Course fee: $20.

 

JRN 215

Workshop: News/Anchoring

1-3 credit hours

Experience in field reporting, research, gathering, and anchoring news production. Students are assigned a beat and work as a team in producing a weekly 30-minute newscast. (May be repeated for credit.)

Course fee: $40.

 

JRN 222

Digital Journalism

3 credit hours

 

JRN 255

News Editing

3 credit hours

A study of the use of principles and practices involved in editing copy in the age of news media convergence. The course includes best practices and editorial functions for newspapers, magazines, broadcast and digital/Internet news media. Additionally, editorial processes for the various types of story types and other media models (such as books, public relations/advertising and enterprise new releases are also covered in the class.

Prerequisites: JRN 107 and 108

Restrictions: Junior or senior standing.

 

JRN 321

Media Law and Ethics

3 credit hours

A historical examination of the development of legal casework affecting journalists and media communicators. Uses a case study approach involving copyright, freedom of press, freedom of speech, libel, defamation, right of privacy, and obscenity.

Prerequisites: JRN 107 and 108

Restrictions: Junior or senior standing.

 

JRN 332

Journalism Seminar

3 credit hours

A multi-directional course with rotating course content emphasizing multiple areas of basic and advanced journalism studies. Includes editing for print, newspaper design and layout, and journalistic ethics.

 

JRN 344

Feature Writing

3 credit hours

An in-depth study of techniques required to conduct creative interviews and to research, write, and sell feature articles.

Prerequisites: JRN 107 and 108

Restrictions: Junior or senior standing.

 

JRN 355

Field Journalism

3 credit hours

Taught in conjunction with International Healing Teams or study abroad trips, includes spring or summer trip an mentored production of various storytelling projects. Students will imbed in the culture with the misson team or study abroad group, where they will do inside out reporting about the geography, culture, lives, challenges and victories of people in other areas of the world. Prior to the trip, class will study ethnographic journalistic techniques necessary for effective reporting from other cutures and countries. This course may also be used for political journalism experience, when taught in conjunction with a Spring Break trip to Washington, D. C. that combines a class of students from the history, humanities and government students with convergence journalism/media students.

Prerequisites: JRN 107, JRN 207, JRN 255, ART 365, TVF 332 or instructor approval.

 

JRN 417

Investigative Reporting

This class offers students the opportunity to participate in real life invetigation and reporting projects. Students will study major investigative projects from the past, such as the Watergate incident, and learn from experts in the field about how to strategize investigative projects, research and report on situations of injustice and corruption, and give an informed voice to the marginalized. The class will work collaboratively on an actual research project and investigation of a meaningful situation, and by utilzing thee intuitive and skilled research an reporting, will pose solutions through exposing the truth.

Prerequisites: JRN 101 and JRN 107.

Course fee: $40

 

JRN 455

Journalism Capstone

3 credit hours

A capstone course incorporating collaborative teamwork in areas of media specialty to develop, create, and deliver comprehensive news media projects to a global audience, utilizing print, photography, graphics, videography, documentary film, radio narrative, TV broadcast, internet/social media and live presentation. The course focuses on the reporting of global situations that require developing an understanding of cross-cultural communication and intercultural impact of societal issues, both in the community/country where they occur as well as gauging worldwide impact. Students will be challenged to understand the global economy, political systems, geography, history and cultural constructs from the region about which they are reporting.    

Seniors work in teams to identify an area where news coverage of issues and unjust or oppressive situations are lacking in visibility. Students research, investigate and evaluate information to determine the best methods and practices approach to writing and producing the multimedia story.  A viable means of approach including developing a storyline, creating an investigative plan, strategizing best research methods, designing storyboards, planning visuals, designating individual areas of responsibility for media production, scripting interviews and narratives are presented by mid-term in the form of a project plan, which will present the culture/history, problem/need and plan for the advocacy or peace journalism media project. Finally, team members plan and present a story utilizing converged production methods to deliver a relevant major news presentation via various forms of media. 

Through these processes team members develop servant-leadership and acquire skills through project-based learning and hands-on converged media production.

Restriction: Senior standing.

 

JRN 499

Senior Research Project

3 credit hours

Specialized research culminating in a senior paper and/ or other approved project.

Prerequisites: JRN 107, 108 and TVF 332

Restriction: Senior standing.

Course fee: $40.

 

JRN 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Language (lang)

 

LANG 112

Language Coaching Lab

1 credit hour

Individualized coaching and instruction in reading, writing, vocabulary, and grammar for students studying French, Spanish, German, and Hebrew. (May be taken two semesters for credit.) (Class contact--2 hours per week.)

 

LANG 300

Career Preparation Studies

0 credit hours

Covers pertinent subjects associated with careers in language-related fields. Includes guest speakers, resume and curriculum vitae preparation, cover letters, mock interviews, field trips, and research. (Two semesters required of English literature, French, and Spanish majors; one semester required for writing majors.) (Pass/Fail only.)

Restriction: Sophomore standing or above.

 

LANG 470

Teaching Language

3 credit hour

A course designed to provide foreign language majors with concepts needed for language learning and instruction. Includes the historical background of teaching modern languages as well as the uses of modern technology in the classroom. Discusses Foreign Language in the Elementary School (FLES), immersion programs, and issues concerning high school programs. Includes writing lesson plans and completing a 10-hour practicum.

Restriction: Junior or senior standing.

 

LANG 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Leadership master of business administration (lmba)

 

LMBA 551

Global Management Concepts

3 credit hours

A study of the leadership and mangement of people and organizatioonal systems and structures, with a view toward creating and sustaining a competitive advantage in global environments. Discover the challenges and opportunities in organizational management and business strategy. Benefit from an overview of the process and effect of internationalization in contemporary business as well as an appreciation of theories, concepts and skills relevant to managing effectively in today’s global environment.

 

LMBA 552

Accounting and Financial Leadership

5-6 credit hours

A study of finance and accounting systems and processes that equips leaders with understanding and uses various financial and accounting tools to make wise decisions to strategically advance organizational performance and effectiveness.

 

LMBA 553

Marketing Leadership

3 credit hours

A study of marketing management, including creating and implementing competitive, market-sensitive, and market-driven organizational development and strategic activity. Emphasizes an integrated, comprehensive understanding and application of classical and contemporary marketing theory, across all of the dimensions of the marketing mix. Examines specific understandings of globalized concepts of marketing.

 

LMBA 565

Strategic Organizational Leadership

3 credit hours

A Leadership Master of Business Administration capstone study of strategic leadership that focuses on creating and implementing a sustainable, competitive advantage across an array of organizations and industiries, including globalized strategic theory and activity. Emphasizes the successful leadership and management of internal, and internal-to-external strategic alignment, vision creation and casting and implementing strategic change initiatives, the strategic allocation and deployment of resources, and the creation and utilization of core competencies through building resources into capabilities that are aligned excellently with market demand and competitive considerations.

 

LMBA 582

Economic Leadership

3 credit hours

A study of economics from a philosophical narmative view with an emphasis on practical leadership applications. Fundamental economic systems are studied with scrutiny regarding the underlying worldview that undergirds each system. Discovery emphasizes operationalizing economic activity and engagement at the organizational level designed to better position leaders to lead and transform organizations, organizational stakeholders and communities within a Biblical worldview construct.

Prerequisite: BUS 201 or 202 (Economics I or II). Economics I (Macroeconomics) preferred.

 

LMBA 585

Leadership Decision Making

3 credit hours

Business leaders are by default, decision makers. In this era of “Big Data.” business leaders must make decisions based on massive amounts of data that they may change rapidly. Therefore, it is critical that the business leader understand the importance of data in the decision-making process and how to use and apply quantitative decision-making methods to analyze this data. This course will provide the business leader with an overview of the data analytic methods used in business to mkae better decisions. Microsoft Excel is the primary analytical software used. While the course is based on statistics, the emphasis is on preparing the business leader to understand the data and analysis techniques and to apply the results to solve business problems.

Prerequisites: Introductory statistics course, prior computer course and permission of the Graduate School of Business.

 

 

Leadership studies (lead)

 

LEAD 399

Leadership Studies Practicum

3-9 credit hours

An internship involving leadership in a local, state, national, international, or non-profit organization, or a business, church, or other suitable site.

Restriction: Permission of Instructor required.

 

LEAD 499

Senior Paper Leadership Studies

3 credit hours

Student preparation of a research paper under the direction of a faculty member. Includes instruction in research methods and styles and in critiquing written materials. (Students eligible for graduation honors must complete a successful oral defense before a faculty committee.)

Restriction: Senior standing.

 

LEAD 999

1-3 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Mathematics (MAT)

 

MAT 099

Introduction to College Mathematics

3 credit hours

A non-specialized course in mathematics that surveys the basic concepts of high school mathematics. (Does not count toward a major or minor in mathematics. Increases the number of hours in a degree program by three credit hours. Does not satisfy general education requirement.)

 

MAT 105

College Algebra

3 credit hours

A treatment that develops the concepts of number systems, absolute value, inequality, domain, range, local extremes, zeros, relations, and functions. Functions studied include those that are linear, polynomial, radical, absolute value, exponential, and logarithmic. (Does not count toward a major or minor in mathematics.)

Course fee: $30.

 

MAT 106

Trigonometry

3 credit hours

A continuation of MAT 105. The concepts developed in the first course are expanded and considered in relationship to rational functions, trigonometric functions, and conic sections. (This is the second course in a two-semester sequence preparing students for calculus. Does not count toward a major or minor in mathematics.)

Prerequisites: MAT 105 (with a grade of "C" of higher); or an appropriate score on the ORU calculus placement exam.

 

MAT 151

Mathematics and Society

3 credit hours

A study of the pattern and order in the universe, including creative thought in making conjectures based on inductive reasoning and application in problem-solving using deductive reasoning. Covers problem-solving, statistics, finance, and logic. (Does not count toward a major or minor in mathematics.)

 

MAT 201

Calculus I

4 credit hours

A thorough course in the differential calculus (with the introduction to anti-differentiation), dealing with the following functions and their applications: algebraic, vector, and transcendental and their inverses.

Prerequisite: MAT 106 (with a grade of "C" of higher) or an appropriate score on the ORU calculus placement exam.

 

MAT 202

Calculus II

4 credit hours

An extension of the techniques used in MAT 201, with an emphasis on standard methods of integration and infinite sequences and series.

Prerequisite: MAT 201 (with a grade of "C" of higher).

 

MAT 207

Discrete Mathematics

3 credit hours

A study of logical reasoning and proof that provides a coherent context in which sets, combinatorics, iteration, and algebraic structures of a discrete nature are considered.

Prerequisite: MAT 202.

 

MAT 208

Elementary Discrete Mathematics

3 credit hours

The study of mathematical structures that are fundamentally discrete rather than continuous. Covers logical reasoning proof that provides a coherent context in which sets, combinatorics, iterations, and algebraic structures or discrete nature are considered. Includes how concepts and notations from discrete mathematics are useful in studying and describing objects and problems in computer algorithims and programming languages, and how they have applications in cryptography, automated theorem proving, and software development.

 

MAT 211

Differential Equations

3 credit hours

A study of linear nth order ordinary differential equations, existence and uniqueness of solutions, and various techniques for solving differential equations.

Prerequisite: MAT 202.

 

MAT 221

Mathematics Concepts I

3 credit hours

A study of the underlying theory of elementary mathematical topics, including problem-solving, sets, numeration, computational algorithms, number theory ratio, proportion, percent, real numbers, and introductory algebra. (Does not count toward a major or minor in mathematics.)

Prerequisite: MAT 105.

 

MAT 222

Mathematics Concepts II

3 credit hours

A study of the underlying theory of elementary mathematical concepts including probability, permutations, combinations, geometry, metrics, congruence, similarity, cartesian coordinates, and transformations using a problem-solving approach. (Does not count toward a major or minor in mathematics.)

Prerequisite: MAT 221.

 

MAT 232

Elementary Statistics

3 credit hours

Designed for students of social and health sciences, education, and business. Includes both descriptive and inferential methods and treats the fundamental concepts exemplified by frequency distributions, measures of central tendency, and variability; the interpretation of results; hypothesis testing; regression; analysis of variance; and chi-square. (Does not count towards major or minor in mathematics.) (Business emphasis sections are available for business majors)

Prerequisites: MAT 105 (with a grade of “”C” or higher) 106, 201, NUR 230, SAT math score of at least 520, or ACT math score of at least 22.

Course fee: $30.

 
MAT 312

Linear and Matrix Algebra

3 credit hours

A study of vector spaces, systems of equations, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, and applications.

Prerequisite: MAT 202.

 

MAT 313

College Geometry

3 credit hours

An extension of topics considered in high school geometry. Employs the analytic method of discovering proofs in the study and application of many fundamental geometric relationships.

Prerequisite: MAT 207.

 

MAT 315

History of Mathematics

3 credit hours

A historical perspective on the development of mathematics. Studies mathematical progress from the ancient Greek and Babylonian periods to present. Explores the contributions of famous mathematicians as well as mathematical systems, their properties, and their use. (This course can substitute for a general education humanities course.)

Prerequisite: MAT 106 or 201.

 

MAT 318

Elementary Number Theory

3 credit hours

A study of the properties of integers; congruences; residue classes; theorems of Fermat, Wilson, Euler, Legendre, and Gauss; polynomial congruences; and quadratic residues.

Prerequisite: MAT 207.

 

MAT 321

Calculus III

4 credit hours

A course studying the calculus of several variables including graphs of functions in three dimensions, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, optimization, multiple integrals, and calculus of vectors.

Prerequisite: MAT 202 (with a grade of "C" of higher).

 

MAT 325

Probability and Statistics

3 credit hours

Covers the basic theory of probability distributions, random variables, mathematical expectation, conditional probability, correlation, central limit theorem, sampling theory, interval estimation, and various statistical tests.

Prerequisite: MAT 202.

 

MAT 332

Introduction to Biostatistics

3 credit hours

An intermediate-level statistics course for students of the health sciences that includes both descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include sampling techniques, various standard distributions, hypothesis testing, and computer-related statistical packages. (Does not count toward major or minor in mathematics.)

Prerequisite: MAT 105, 106, or 201.

 

MAT 401

Higher Algebra

3 credit hours

A consideration of classical abstract algebra. Structures included are groups, rings, integral domains, fields, and extension fields.

Prerequisite: MAT 312.

 

MAT 421

Advanced Calculus I

3 credit hours

A development of a metric topology for the real number line. Includes connectedness and compactness of sets and continuity and differentiability of functions.

Prerequisites: MAT 202 and 321.

 

MAT 422

Advanced Calculus II

3 credit hours

A continuation of MAT 421. Considers integrability and both pointwise and uniform convergence of sequences of functions.

Prerequisite: MAT 421.

 

MAT 428

Secondary Methods: Mathematics

3 credit hours

A course designed to prepare mathematics education students with ideas and practical knowledge for the classroom. Focuses on materials and methods of teaching mathematics.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program.

 

MAT 429

Topics in Mathematics

1-3 credit hours

A seminar surveying topics relevant to student interest and need. (May be repeated for a maximum of six hours credit.)

Restriction: Permission from instructor required.

 

MAT 433

Applied Statistics

3 credit hours

An advanced level statistics course for students in the behavioral sciences, designed to target specific research problems and advanced statistical methods leading to graduate studies in the field. Topics include sampling techniques, non-parametric statistics, one-way and multi-way ANOVAs, MANOVAs, correlations, hypothesis testing, and research ethics.

Prerequisite: MAT 232.

 

MAT 451

Mathematics Education Internship

2 credit hours

A practicum in which the student works one-on-one with an ORU teacher to improve skills in course preparation and administration, time management, tutoring, and communication. The student has opportunity to learn about and become involved in professional organizations and research.

Restriction: Permission of department chair.

 
MAT 455

Mathematical Methods in Physics

3 credit hours

Application of mathematics methods in solving physics problems involving linear and nonlinear differential and partial differential equations. (Cross listed with PHY 455).

Prerequisites: PHY 211 and 211L.

Restrictions: Junior or senior student level; permission from instructor.

Course fee: $55.

 

MAT 498

Senior Paper/Project Preparation

1 credit hour

Assists students in preparing for their senior paper/project and ePortfolio.

 

MAT 499

Senior Paper/Project

2 credit hours

Special topics approved by the student and instructor.

Prerequisite: MAT 498.

 

MAT 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Mechanical Engineering (ME)

 

ME 321

Mechanics of Materials

3 credit hours

A study of elastic and inelastic stress-strain behavior of engineering materials, deflection of beams, and column action. Incorporates lab experience and design. (Cross listed with PHY 454.)

Prerequisite: EGR 221.

Course fee: $55.

 

ME 331

Applied Thermodynamics

3 credit hours

Application of the principles of thermodynamics to components and systems. Examples include pumps, compressors, engines, turbines, and electricity-generating power plants. The thermodynamics of high speed flows are also covered. (Cross listed with PHY 453.)

Prerequisite: EGR 231.

Course fee: $55.

 

ME 371

Machines and Mechanisms

3 credit hours

A study of the design of machines based on kinematic and kinetic requirements. Machine elements considered include linkages, cams, and engines. Presents inertia force analysis as a basis for the dynamic balancing of rotating machinery. Students conduct lab experiments and design and construct mechanism models.

Prerequisite: EGR 222.

Course fee: $55.

 

ME 381

Principles of Design

3 credit hours

The study and application of the methods of analysis used to design machine components based on the stresses and strains induced by static, dynamic, and thermal loads. Considers avoidance of failure due to impact, fatigue, wear, and surface damage. Introduces finite element analysis of structures. Design projects are required.

Prerequisite: ME 321.

Course fee: $75.

 

ME 433

Heat Transfer

3 credit hours

Problem-solving in the three modes of heat transfer—conduction, convection, and radiation—separately and in combinations. Additional topics include boiling, condensation, and heat exchanger design. Students conduct lab experiments, design a heat exchanger, and use the computer for complicated heat transfer analyses.

Prerequisite: ME 331.

Course fee: $75.

 

ME 441

Fluid Mechanics

3 credit hours

Analysis of the behavior of stationary and flowing fluids. Topics include fluid statics, control volumes, differential analysis, incompressible inviscid flow, dimensional analysis, incompressible viscous flows. Students conduct experiments. Introduces SolidWorks Flow Simulation softeware.

Prerequisite: ME 331.

Course fee: $75.

 

ME 444

Experimental Methods

3 credit hours

Introduction to experimental methods including measurement techniques, instrumentation, computer-aided data acquisition, and data analysis in mechanical and thermal-fluid systems.

Prerequisite: MAT 325.

Course fee: $55.

 

ME 447

Finite Element Method

3 credit hours

An introduction to the theory, programming, and application of the finite element method used to solve problems in engineering analysis and design. Includes using the computer to conduct a finite element analysis of two- and three-dimensional models.

Prerequisite: ME 321.

Prereqisite or corequisite: MAT 312.

Course fee: $75.

 

ME 450

Special Topics

3 credit hours

Courses of current interest.

Restriction: Permission from instructor required.

Course fee: $75.

 

ME 461

Manufacturing Processes

3 credit hours

The study of fabrication processes for the production of metallic, plastic, and composite parts.

Prerequisites: MAT 201

Restriction: Junior standing.

Course fee: $75.

 

ME 495

Directed Study

1-3 credit hours

Directed independent study on problems of limited scope approved on an individual basis. May require written and/or oral presentation.

Restriction: Permission from instructor or department chair.

 

ME 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Prerequisite: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Management (MGT)

 

MGT 130

Principles of Management

3 credit hours

A study of the functions of management; includes the analysis and evaluation of the planning, organization, staffing, controlling, and directing responsibilities of a manager. Covers the theory and applicability of management-by-objectives.

 

MGT 333

Supply Chain Management

3 credit hours

An introduction to and analysis of the principles of supply chain management. Includes how supply chain management integrates many aspects of business functions such as forecasting, inventory management, materials planning and control, information systems, supplier management, transportation/logistics, and customer service.

Prerequisites: MGT 130 and ACT 320.

 

MGT 341

Business Communications

3 credit hours

A survey of all areas of business communications, not as an isolated unit of learning but as a universal activity. Designed to cultivate and refine a repertoire of basic essentials of communications. (Cross listed with PRFB 504.)

 

MGT 351

Risk Management

3 credit hours

A survey course outlining risk and insurance, including increased government participation in and regulation of insurance along with current versions of basic insurance contracts.

 

MGT 352

Organizational Behavior

3 credit hours

A study of individual and group behavior and dynamics within organizations, with an emphasis on motivation, leadership, stress, group and intergroup dynamics, conflict, power and politics, and culture. (Crosslisted with GMGT 553.)

Prerequisite: MGT 130.

 

MGT 353

Human Resource Management

3 credit hours

Studies the management of human resources at the organizational level, including human resource forecasting, planning, and training and development. Topics include the legislative environment of human resource management, labor relations, job analysis, recruiting, performance appraisal, and compensation.

Prerequisite: MGT 130.

 

MGT 372

Creative Thinking

3 credit hours

An introduction to the modern practices of creative thinking in all areas of the business environment. (Cross listed with GMGT 541.)

 

MGT 384

Real Estate Management

3 credit hours

A survey of the concepts, practices, and problems related to the production, marketing, and financing of land and improvements to the land. Includes an analysis of the physical, social, governmental, and economic factors that influence the market for residential, recreational, commercial, and industrial real estate. Other topics include brokerage, legal, and ethical factors in real estate; investment strategy; land development; housing and construction; city planning; and land use controls.

 

MGT 421

Entrepreneurship

3 credit hours

A study of the art and science of entrepreneurship. Develops technical knowledge through discussion of the tools needed to successfully start and operate a business. Emphasizes the qualitative aspects of entrepreneurship. (Cross listed with GFIN 555.)

 

MGT 422

Small Business Basics

3 credit hours

A survey of management principles concerning planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and staffing at the organizational level in the small business environment. (Cross listed with GMGT 556.)

 

MGT 431

Strategic Management

3 credit hours

Examines the operations of firms within industries from a macro perspective. Studies strategy formulation, strategy implementation, and strategy evaluation and control. Focuses on the competitive abilities and strategies of the firm and integrates concepts from the functional areas of accounting, finance, information systems, management, and marketing. (One of two capstone courses that must be taken by all ORU School of Business seniors.)

Prerequisite: FIN 338.

Restriction: Senior standing.

National Field Test in Business fee: $25.

 

MGT 443

Executive Leadership Development

3 credit hours

A study of business career patterns, including a review of the actual careers of successful people in business and an analysis of their behavior patterns. Students relate this information to their own business careers. Includes the history, background, sources, causes of the behavior, and career patterns of the business executive. (Cross listed with GMGT 551.)

Restriction: Business major or minor.

 

MGT 451

Management Internship

1-3 credit hours

A special problem in management may be permitted for the student of special ability in lieu of a regular course. It is also possible upon receiving written approval from the instructor to obtain an on-the-job apprenticeship for one semester to provide data for writing a formal paper. (Credit received is determined by the nature and scope of the project.)

Restriction: Management major.

 

MGT 461

Conflict Resolution

3 credit hours

An introduction to the principles and application of the processes and theories of personal conflict resolution, mediation, and negotiations. Focuses on conflict resolution in various business-related settings. (Cross listed with GMGT 560.)

 

MGT 465

Administration of Nonprofit Organizations

3 credit hours

A study of the functions of management—planning, organizing, leading, and controlling—within the nonprofit sector. Focuses on theories of organizations and general concepts of management, governance, and leadership. Includes organizational design, behavior, performance, and effectiveness and analyzes the special character and management of problems of nonprofit organizations. (Cross listed with GMGT 521.)

 

MGT 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Missions (MISS)

 

MISS 300

History of Missions

3 credit hours

A short survey of the history of modern missions and an examination of the tactics and practices of the Biblical basis of missions. Proposes a people-to-people strategy working from within the culture.

 

MISS 325

Introduction to Christian Missions

3 credit hours

Provides a general overview of missions. Examines missionary principles and practices from Biblical, historical, and cultural perspectives and helps the students to formulate a personal approach to missions. It further prepares them for other related mission studies.

 

MISS 333

Theology of Missions

3 credit hours

A study of the Biblical and theological basis and guidelines for the Church’s world mission, with application to current practice. Includes contemporary theological perspectives on missions.

 

MISS 350

Missions and Culture

3 credit hours

Examines the vital role culture plays in spreading the Gospel. Studies the origins and development of people groups from a cross-cultural perspective.

Prerequisite: MISS 325.

 

MISS 396

Internship Preparation

1 credit hour

A one hour course to prepare students for their internship who are MISS and GMMP majors.  Course focuses on financial, spiritual, emotional and intellectual preparation. Examines and helps students implement successful preparation strategies for the croiss-cultural internship. This course is required to be completed in the fall prior to enrolling in MISS 397.

 

MISS 397

Missions Internship

2-6 credit hours

A work program designed to provide practical experience in a mission environment. Spends a minimum of four months (three months in the summer) on the field under the supervision of competent mission personnel.

Prerequisites: Prior cross-cultural experience and acceptance into the Mission Internship Program.

 

MISS 398

Global Ministry and the Marketplace Internship

2-6 credit hours

A work program designed to provide practical experience in a mission environment. Spends a minimum of four months (three months in the summer) on the field under the supervision of competent mission personnel.

Prerequisites: Prior cross-cultural experience and acceptance into the Mission Internship Program.

 

MISS 401

Ministry and Business

3 credit hours

Examines the role business can play in spreading the gospel in the global setting. Explores the related models of marketplace ministries, tentmaking, enterprise development, and business as mission.

Prerequisites: MISS 325.

 

MISS 404

Church Growth and Planting

3 credit hours

An orientation to the varied dimensions of starting new churches. Applies basic principles and procedures of church growth to both the world mission and local church situations. These studies are related to evangelism, mission, education, and administrative leadership.

 

MISS 455

Intensive Studies

1-3 credit hours

An investigation of selected missions themes. Area of study may vary.

 

 

MISS 499

Senior Paper/Portfolio

3 credit hours

Designed for seniors who, after completing 150 hours of missions internship experience, write a major paper that takes into account their internship experiences, philosophy of ministry and a research component that deals with a specialized area of missions.

Prerequisites: THE 217 and MISS 397.

 

MISS 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Marketing (MKT)

 

MKT 130

Principles of Marketing

3 credit hours

A study of the structure and analysis of consumer and industrial markets and the behavior of business firms in a competitive economy. Includes marketing policies and practices, marketing consumer goods, and marketing industrial goods.

 

MKT 333

Consumer Behavior

3 credit hours

A study of the consumer as the focal point in a dynamic economic system. Explores a large body of published and unpublished literature, discusses generalizations, and develops various practical implications of consumer information processing. Such an approach leads to the exploration and use of new marketing techniques and methods. (Cross listed with GMKT 533.)

Prerequisite: MKT 130.

 

MKT 334

Integrated Marketing Communications

3 credit hours

A study of the process of analyzing, planning, and evaluating promotional strategy and management. Examines the varied elements of advertising, personal selling and sales promotion, and optimum promotional mix, through integration and organization. (Cross listed with GMKT 534.)

Prerequisite: MKT 130.

 

MKT 346

Selling and Sales Management

3 credit hours

A study of the management of the outside sales force. Topics include organizing, staffing, operating, and planning functions in a sales-management context. Uses computer simulation. (Cross listed with GMKT 546.)

Prerequisite: MKT 130.

 

MKT 350

Internet Marketing

3 credit hours

Provides students with a detailed look at the process of planning and designing tools to be used in online marketing as well as an overview of the online marketing industry.

Prerequisite: MKT 130.

 

MKT 361

International Marketing

3 credit hours

Provides analysis of the “Five Ps” of marketing as they relate to the globalization of the economy. Emphasizes contemporary periodical articles and textual material. Includes case analysis and student projects to highlight both the theoretical and the operational aspects of international marketing. (Cross listed with GINB 570.)

Prerequisite: MKT 130.

 

MKT 445

Marketing Research

3 credit hours

A study of the systems, techniques, and methods used in meeting marketing management information needs.

Prerequisite: MKT 130.

 

MKT 447

Retail Management

3 credit hours

A detailed survey of all aspects of managing a retail operation. Topics include demand analysis, inventory planning and control, marketing mix development, and career opportunities.

Prerequisite: MKT 130.

 

MKT 451

Marketing Internship

1-3 credit hours

A special problem in marketing may be permitted for the student of special ability in lieu of a regular course. It is also possible upon receiving written approval from the instructor to obtain an on-the-job apprenticeship for one semester to provide data for writing a formal paper. The credit received is determined by the nature and scope of the project.

Restriction: Marketing majors only.

 

MKT 455

Marketing Management

3 credit hours

Acapstone marketing course designed to integrate the student’s knowledge of marketing through case analysis and practical application of the various marketing tools.

Restrictions: Marketing majors only; senior standing.

 

MKT 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Mass Media Communication (MMC)

 

MMC 104

Media and Pop Culture

3 credit hours

A survey of the mass media and an introduction to the Mass Media Studies Program. Includes an introduction to form, content, and current issues relating to modern culture. Also includes consequences of mass communication through historical perspectives.

 

MMC 489

Campaign Strategies

3 credit hours

A capstone course incorporating teamwork to develop, create, and deliver a specific product to a defined audience, utilizing print, media, and personal presentation.

Restriction: Senior standing.

 

MMC 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Music (MUS)

 

MUS 001-025, 051

Applied Music (Secondary instrument or voice). Vocal, keyboard, orchestral instrument, or Audio Workstation lessons. (One 25-minute lesson per week.) Note: A jury is required for all applied music lessons.

1 credit hour

MUS 001 Piano**

MUS 002 Organ**

MUS 003 Harpsichord**

MUS 004 Voice

MUS 005 Guitar

MUS 006 Harp**

MUS 007 Violin

MUS 008 Viola

MUS 009 Violoncello

MUS 010 Drum Set

MUS 011 Bass, Double and Electric

MUS 012 Flute

MUS 013 Oboe

MUS 014 Clarinet

MUS 015 Saxophone

MUS 016 Bassoon

MUS 017 French Horn

MUS 018 Trumpet

MUS 019 Trombone

MUS 021 Baritone Horn

MUS 022 Tuba

MUS 023 Percussion**

MUS 024 Composition

MUS 025 Audio Workstation***

MUS 051 Arranging

Restriction: Department approval required.

Course fee: $250 per credit hour.

**Instrument use fee: $55.

***Lab fee: $55.

 

MUS 026-049, 059

Applied Music (Primary instrument or voice). Vocal, keyboard, or orchestral instrument, or Audio Workstation lessons. (One 50-minute lesson per week.) Note: A jury is required for all applied music lessons.

2 credit hours

MUS 026 Piano**

MUS 027 Organ**

MUS 028 Harpsichord**

MUS 029 Voice

MUS 031 Guitar

MUS 032 Harp**

MUS 033 Violin

MUS 034 Viola

MUS 035 Violoncello

MUS 036 Bass, Double and Electric

MUS 037 Flute

MUS 038 Oboe

MUS 039 Clarinet

MUS 040 Saxophone

MUS 041 Bassoon

MUS 042 French Horn

MUS 043 Trumpet

MUS 044 Trombone

MUS 045 Baritone Horn

MUS 046 Tuba

MUS 047 Percussion**

MUS 048 Composition

MUS 049 Audio Workstation***

MUS 052 Contemporary Guitar

MUS 053 Contemporary Piano

MUS 054 Contemporary Drums and Percussion

MUS 055 Contemporary Bass

MUS 059 Arranging

Restriction: Department approval required.

Course fee: $250 per credit hour.

**Instrument use fee: $55

***Music tech fee: $55.

 

MUS 061-089

Performance Groups (band, choir, orchestra, or ensemble.)

0-1 credit hour

MUS 061 Chamber Singers*

MUS 063 University Chorale*

MUS 065 Orchestra*

MUS 067 Wind Ensemble*

MUS 070 Chamber Ensemble*

MUS 073 Opera Theatre*

MUS 075 Jazz Ensemble*

MUS 077 Basketball Band*

MUS 080 Guitar Ensemble*

MUS 081 String Ensemble*

MUS 083 Brass Ensemble*

MUS 085 Vocal Jazz Ensemble*

MUS 086 Jazz Combo*

MUS 087 Bell Choir**

MUS 089 Contemporary Music Ministry Ensemble

*Music ensemble fee: $40.

**Instrument use fee: $55.

 

MUS 098

Seminar for Worship Majors

0.5 credit hour

A course giving students opportunities to share views on worship and to dialogue with music representatives, professional music ministers, recording artists, studio musicians, professors, and pastors.

 

MUS 099

Music Seminar

0.5 credit hour

Content includes the following: (1) convocations to orient students to departmental policies, to advise students for preregistration, and to instruct students in special areas of music interest, such as music ministry as it relates to the superordinate goals of the university and music’s interrelatedness to the visual arts, drama literature, and history; (2) recitals of faculty and students in solo and ensemble performances; and (3) recital and concert performances both on and off campus. (This course is required for seven semesters for music majors--only four receive credit--and four semesters for minors.)

 

MUS 100

Fundamentals of Music

3 credit hours

A study of the rudiments of music, including notation, scales, key signatures, simple intervals, primary triads, dominant seventh chords, basic musical terminology, and simple practices in contemporary music, as well as ear training and keyboard chording. (Not designed for music majors.)

 

MUS 101

Harmony I

2 credit hours

Provides a foundation in analytical, quasi-compositional, and keyboard skills combined with historical perspectives. Introduces style periods and style analysis. Includes the rudiments of music and harmonic concepts and all diatonic triads in major and minor keys in root position and inversions. Presents melodic structure for purposes of analyzing and creating with applications to music beyond that of the common practice period of Western civilization. (Companion course to MUS 103.)

Prerequisite: MUS 100 or a passing score on the music theory placement exam.

 

MUS 102

Harmony II

2 credit hours

A continuation of MUS 101. Includes (1) analysis of music including half and fully diminished sevenths, non-dominant sevenths, secondary dominants and modulation, two-and three-part song forms, and American popular song, along with blues, boogie, and jazz; (2) part-writing of figured basses, harmonizing in chorale, instrumental and keyboard styles, and composing and improvising using harmonic and stylistic vocabularies; and (3) harmonizing at the keyboard excerpts of folk songs, American popular songs, blues, boogie, and jazz.

Prerequisites: MUS 101 and 103; or evidence of comparable study or skills.

Corequisite: MUS 104.

 

MUS 103

Sight Singing and Ear Training I

2 credit hours

Combines practice and drill with lecture-demonstration teaching methods and computer-assisted instruction to develop skills enabling the student to correctly interpret music that is notated and to correctly notate music that is heard. Includes sight singing and ear training of rhythmic beats and their division; intervals; melodies built around leaps of the primary chords primarily in treble and bass clefs and in major and minor modes; aural perception of harmony involving the principal triads with inversions, and the supertonic and submediant tone triads.

Prerequisite: MUS 100 or a Music Theory Placement Exam score that demonstrates an understanding of the basic rudiments of music, including the correct use of treble and bass staves, knowledge of keys and key signatures, the ability to read elementary rhythms within simple and compound meters.

 

MUS 104

Sight Singing and Ear Training II

2 credit hours

Combines practice and drill with lecture-demonstration teaching methods and computer-assisted instruction to develop the skills enabling students to interpret music that is notated and to notate music that is heard. Includes (1) sight singing melodies built around leaps involving all diatonic triads, the dominant seventh, and supertonic seventh chords; and (2) aural study of rhythmic subdivision, intervals, melodies with diatonic harmonic background, diatonic harmonic progressions including the dominant seventh and supertonic seventh chords, secondary dominants, secondary leading tone chords, and elementary modulation.

Prerequisites: MUS 101 and 103; or evidence of comparable knowledge and skills.

Corequisite: MUS 102.

 

MUS 105

Introduction to Music Production

1 credit hour

A survey of concepts, equipment, and techniques associated with the modern electronic studio. Includes most aspects of MIDI and the use of microphones, speakers, and the mixer board.

Prerequisite: MUS 100 or 101.

Lab fee: $55.

 

MUS 106

Intermediate Music Production

1 credit hour

A survey of concepts, equipment, and techniques associated with the contemporary music recording studio. Includes aspects of digital audio editing, and the Digital Audio Workstation (DAW) software, including traditional MIDI and the use of microphones, speakers, and the mixer board.

Prerequisite: MUS 100 or 101.

Lab fee: $55.

 

MUS 124

Preparatory Class Piano

1 credit hour

A course designed for non-music majors who have had little or no previous experience in reading music. Instruction includes basic musical skills, elementary reading, improvisation, and solo and ensemble repertoire.

Restriction: Permission of instructor required.

Instrument use fee: $55.

 

MUS 125

Class Piano I

1 credit hour

A course designed for students with minimal piano training. Group instruction includes simple sight reading in treble and bass clefs, improvisation, and beginning keyboard technique, such as all major scales and arpeggios, accompaniments, solo and ensemble repertoire, and elementary keyboard transposition.

Prerequisite: Ability to read treble and bass clefs.

Restriction: Permission of instructor required.

Instrument use fee: $55.

 

MUS 126

Class Piano II

1 credit hour

A course designed for students with basic keyboard skills. Group instruction includes intermediate sight reading, improvisation, keyboard technique in all major and harmonic minor scales and arpeggios, and selected chord progressions. Also covers solo and ensemble repertoire, simple hymns, patriotic songs, and two- or three-voiced transposition.

Prerequisite: MUS 125 or equivalent.

Instrument use fee: $55.

 

MUS 127

Class Piano III

1 credit hour

A course designed for students with intermediate-level keyboard skills. Offers group instruction for non-music majors and for those music majors whose secondary instrument is piano and who need additional development of keyboard skills including sight reading four-voiced hymns, transposition, choral and instrumental score reading, major and harmonic minor scales and arpeggios, chord progressions, dominant- and diminished-seventh chords and arpeggios, simple modulations, solo and ensemble repertoire, and patriotic songs.

Prerequisite: MUS 126 or equivalent.

Instrument use fee: $55.

 

MUS 131

Class Voice

1 credit hour

An introduction to the development of the singing voice based upon the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and stressing phonemic accuracy. (Students cannot repeat this course.)

 

MUS 135

Class Guitar I

1 credit hour

A lecture/demonstration teaching method designed to acquaint the student with appropriate skills for playing the guitar in a variety of styles and settings.

 

MUS 136

Class Guitar II

1 credit hour

A lecture/demonstration teaching method designed to acquaint the intermediate or advanced beginning student with appropriate skills for playing the guitar in a variety of styles and settings.

 

MUS 137

Techniques for Recording Acoustic Music

1 credit hour

Designed to familiarize students with the distinct issues inherent in the recording of acoustic music and to provide opportunities for students to record and mix acoustic music in a digital environment.

Prerequisite: MUS 105 or equivalent.

Instrument use fee: $55.

 

MUS 160

Live Sound

3 credit hours

An in-depth study of concepts, equipment, and techniques associated with the modern sound system. Includes aspects of the appropriate use of various microphones, public address components, and related items. Lectures are supplemented with and supported by practical, hands-on application.

Prerequisite: MUS 105.

Instrument Use Fee: $55.

 

MUS 165

Lights/Projection for Music

2 credit hours

An in-depth study of concepts, equipment, and techniques associated with modern lighting and video presentation. Includes aspects of the appropriate use of related software and hardware. Lectures are supplemented with and supported by practical, hands-on application.

Prerequisite: MUS 105.

Instrument Use Fee: $55.

 

MUS170

Cross-Cultural Worship

3 credit hours

A study of Christian musical worship practices from various cultural perspectives--how they are similar, how they differ, and how they can effectively enhance, enliven, and enrich each other.

 

MUS 201

Harmony, Sight Singing, and Ear Training III

3 credit hours

A continuation of MUS 102 and 104 that employs lecture, discussion, demonstration, compositional and analytical assignments, and drill of advanced musicianship skills. Includes (1) aural and visual analysis of music representative of modal harmony; 18th century counterpoint; chromatic harmony including borrowed chords; Neapolitan and augmented sixth chords; and Classical techniques such as variation and sonata/allegro form; (2) quasi-compositional skills in imitating and adapting the previously mentioned styles and techniques; (3) sight singing and ear training of material studied during the semester; and (4) keyboard skills relating to harmonization and other uses of certain techniques presented during the semester.

Prerequisites: MUS 102 and 104 or evidence of equivalent skills and knowledge.

 

MUS 202

Harmony, Sight Singing, and Ear Training IV

3 credit hours

A continuation of MUS 201 that employs lecture, discussion, demonstration, compositional and analytical assignments, and drill of advanced musicianship skills. Includes (1) aural and visual analysis of music representative of larger forms, chromatic mediants, altered chords, extended chords, remote modulation, post-Romanticism, Impressionism, and the contemporary; (2) quasi-compositional skills in imitating and adapting the styles and techniques studied; (3) sight singing and ear training of material studied during the semester; and (4) keyboard skills relating to harmonization and other uses of certain techniques presented during the semester.

Prerequisite: MUS 201 or evidence of equivalent skills and knowledge.

 

MUS 205

History and Literature of Music I

4 credit hours

A study of the history of Western music in Europe and America from antiquity through the 18th century.

 

MUS 206

History and Literature of Music II

4 credit hours

A study of the development, styles, and literature of Western music in Europe and America from Beethoven to the present.

 

MUS 207

Guitar Skills for Worship

2 hours credit

A study of the mechanics of contemporary worship using acoustic guitar and the improvisational techniques associated with it.

Prerequisite: Music Theory Placement exam or MUS 100.

 

MUS 208

Music in World Cultures

3 credit hours

Go beyond music performance and discover the "why" of music. Through the study of music systems, instruments and performances around the globe, the student can begin to understand the people and beliefs they represent. Students will learn the basic tools for interacting with music and musicians in any culture and be exposed to a vast array of music styles.

 

MUS 210

Keyboard Skills for Worship

2 hours credit

A study of keyboard techniques applicable to modern worship. Students improvise materials from chord charts and apply knowledge of new techniques in weekly performances. Some keyboard experience and basic music reading are required.

Prerequisite: Music Theory Placement exam or MUS 100.

Instrument fee: $55.

 

MUS 228

Contemporary Music Theory/Lead Chart Notation

2 credit hours

Presents contemporary music theory concepts that equip the student to function within a contemporary musical framework.

Prerequisite: MUS 210 or MUS 207.

Instrument use fee: $55.

 

MUS 241

Phonetics and English Diction for Singers

1 credit hour

A fundamental course designed to acquaint voice students with the International Phonetic Alphabet and its application to English and Italian vocal literature. Students also study specific management issues relating to the use of phonetics in the vocal ensemble.

 

MUS 242

Diction for Singers

2 credit hours

A presentation of principles for the correct pronunciation of French and German texts in vocal literature.

Prerequisite: MUS 241.

 

MUS 260

Live Sound 2

2 credit hours

A study of Live Sound Reinforcement. Focuses on the art of mixing and in-depth controls of a sound reinforcement system. Covers the complete operation of a sound reinforcement system in a real-world, live concert or event setting.

Prerequisite: MUS 105 or equivalent and MUS 160.

Instrument use fee: $55.

 

MUS 270

Ethnomusicology in Practice

3 credit hours

A study in the foundational principles of ethnomusicology and how to appy them in cross-cultural ministry. This course will preapre you to interact with musicians from other cultures in relevant and sensitive ways. Students will learn how to use ethnomusicology principles to encourage communities to engage in their own selection of arts, those most meaningful to them, to meet their felt needs.

 

MUS 300

Music Appreciation

3 credit hours

A non-technical course aimed at increasing the enjoyment and appreciation of music by the listener with little or no previous music background. Includes a brief survey of music history and the basic principles of music form as illustrated by masterworks. (Cross listed with HUM 260.)

 

MUS 301

Form and Analysis

2 credit hours

The study of musical form and structure in tonal and non-tonal music based on the systematic perception of musical phenomena.

Prerequisites: MUS 101, 102, 201, and 202.

 

MUS 302

Orchestration

2 credit hours

Examines the range and characteristics of orchestral instruments; scoring for strings, winds, and full orchestra.

Prerequisites: MUS 101, 102, 201, and 202.

 

MUS 309

Biblical Foundations of Worship

3 credit hours

Provides a Biblical, theological, and practical examination of worship and prophetic leadership in the ministry of the Church. Provides practical, contemporary demonstration of this Biblical concept, which was demonstrated in Old Testament Hebrew worship, the life of Christ and the New Testament church, by exposing students to the practices and concepts of worship in the context of the prophetic anointing.

 

MUS 310

Studies in Advanced Music Production

3 credit hours

An in-depth study of concepts, equipment, and techniques associated with the modern electronic music studio. Includes most aspects of MIDI as well as dedicated music software, poweruser techniques, current trends, hardware, and information resources. Other subjects may include notation, composing for pictures, sequencing, sampling, controllers, and other topics. The course, designed to follow MUS 105, is project-oriented and requires lab time.

Prerequisite: MUS 105 or equivalent.

Instrument Use Fee: $55

 

MUS 313

Digital Audio Workstation

3 credit hours

A course designed to acquaint students with the creative potential of the Digital Audio Workstation as an essential tool in modern recording studios. Includes the use of Mac-based music recording software to create commercially viable musical ideas.

 

MUS 315

Music for Film and Other Media

3 credit hours

Educates and trains students in creating music for film, video games, and other related media. Focuses on social media and the opportunities it affords in this field Includes the use of Mac-based music recording software.

 

MUS 316

Music, Distribution and Social Media

3 credit hours

An in-depth study of concepts, equipment and techniques associated with the distribution of contemporary music. Includes recent trends in social media options as well as more established traditions and avenues of music distribution.

Prerequisite: MUS 105 or equivalent.

 

MUS 320

Songwriting and Arranging

2 credit hours

A study of the compositional techniques, contemporary harmonizations, arranging tools, and popular song forms suitable for the small ensemble. Particular attention is given to writing and arranging for the church ensemble.

Prerequisite: MUS 100 or passing music theory placement exam.

 

MUS 325

Vocal Pedagogy and Repertoire

1 credit hour

A lecture-discussion-demonstration course that acquaints students with the main elements of human sound production and basic vocal faults. Involves teaching and diagnostic techniques, including those of classroom management for practical application.

Prerequisites: MUS 029, 241, and 242.

 

MUS 326

Instrumental Pedagogy and Repertoire

1 credit hour

A lecture-discussion-demonstration course for the woodwind, brass, percussion, or string major who anticipates a career as a professional musician in a performance group, a soloist, an instrumental teacher in public or private schools, or as a private studio teacher.

Restriction: Department approval required.

 

MUS 327

Keyboard Pedagogy and Repertoire

1 credit hour

A lecture-discussion-demonstration course for the keyboard major or minor who anticipates a future profession in individual and group studio teaching.

Restriction: Department approval required.

 

MUS 328

Orchestration for Film Music

3 credit hours

Designed to teach students how to compose and score music for moving pictures, game soundtracks and voice over recordings, utilizing human vocalists and instrumentalists in a live recording environment.

Course fee: $55.

 

MUS 329

Marching Band Techniques

1 credit hour

The fundamental techniques of drill design and band management.

 

MUS 333

Conducting I

2 credit hours

A practical lab course in both choral and instrumental conducting that stresses baton technique, interpretation, rehearsal techniques, and score reading as specifically related to the needs of the elementary and secondary choral and instrumental school music teacher as well as the church musician.

Prerequisite: MUS 101 and 102.

 

MUS 335

Composition I

2 credit hours

A study of the organization of musical ideas into logical and homogenous form. Focuses on composition in the small forms.

Prerequisite: MUS 202.

 

MUS 337

Composition: Small Ensembles

3 credit hours

Presents compositional techniques and encourages original creation of small forms in both classical chamber music and jazz. Equal musical craftsmanship is expected in both genres.

Prerequisite: MUS 335.

 

MUS 338

20th Century Composition Materials

3 credit hours

Designed to teach styles and techniques of 20th century art music. Studies techniques in the context of masterworks in the small and large ensemble chamber music style. The student composes several semester projects using not fewer than three instruments, making use of techniques studied during the semester.

Prerequisite: MUS 335.

 

MUS 341

Brass and Percussion Instruments Class

1 credit hour

A survey of the fundamentals of each brass and percussion instrument. Includes methods, teaching materials, and application of two or more of the instruments.

Instrument use fee: $55.

 

MUS 342

Woodwind Instruments Class

1 credit hour

A survey of the fundamentals of each of the woodwind instruments. Includes methods, teaching materials, and application of two or more of the instruments.

Instrument use fee: $55.

 

MUS 352

History of Musical Theatre

2 credit hours

A history of musical theater from its antecedents through its golden age to present-day. Focuses on this genre in America.

Restriction: Permission of the department.

 

MUS 360

Advanced Film Music

3 credit hours

Designed to teach students how to compose and score music for moving pictures, game soundtracks and voice over situations.

Prerequisites: MUS 313 and MUS 315.

Course fee: $55.

 

MUS 370

Ethnic Music Perspectives

1 credit hour

Concentrated study through performance of a selected ethnic music culture. Topics vary. Cultural focus may also correspond with the cultural foci of the available ethnomusicology internships. Course can be completed up to three times.

 

MUS 381

Sound Stage Recording

3 credit hours

Designed to teach students how to compose and score music for moving pictures, game soundtracks and voice over recordings, utilizing human vocalists and instrumentalists in a live recording environment.

Prerequisite: MUS 302.

Instrument use fee: $55.

 

MUS 385

Advanced Music Production

3 credit hours

An in-depth study of concepts, equipment and techniques associated with the assembly and operation of the contemporary music recording studio. Lectures are contrasted with and supported by practical, hands-on application.

Prerequisites: MUS 049, 313 and 381.

 

MUS 389

Music Industry Practices

3 credit hours

An in-depth study of concepts, practices and trends associated with the current commercial music industry. Lectures and contrasted with and supported by practical, hands-on application.

Prerequsiite: MUS 310.

 

MUS 399

Junior Recital

2 credit hours

A performance demonstrating a competency, approximately 25 minutes of music. A required prerequisite for senior recital.

 

MUS 401

Principles of Counterpoint

2 credit hours

The study and analysis of 18th-century counterpoint. Focuses on two-voiced writing based mainly on the principles of the Baroque composers.

Prerequisite: MUS 202.

 

MUS 417

The Worship Service: Design and Function

3 credit hours

Focuses on the role of worship leading, with particular emphasis on first-hand experience. Addresses various theological, musical, and technical demands of leading worship, including incorporating scripture, prayers, images, and the Church calendar year. Also considers theme-based worship, arranging, teaching new songs, collaborating with pastors and other musicians, and growing spiritually.

 

MUS 420

Worship Internship

3 credit hours

A practicum in which students gain practical experience in a church setting.

Restriction: Permission from the Coordinator of Church Music and Worship.

 

MUS 421

Senior Recital

2-3 credit hours

A performance demonstrating a high level of performance practice of music representing three to four historical style periods. (For B.M. voice primary degree candidates, facility in three to four languages is required.) Each recital should contain approximately 50 minutes of music. B.M.E. candidates may choose to perform a full recital as outlined above or a music education recital for two, instead of three credit hours. Such a recital is to be approximately two-thirds of the full requirement in length and performance demands.A lecture recital is also available and does not require a junior recital as a prerequisite.

Prerequisites in applied music: Primary—For MUP majors, 14 credit hours and successful junior recital. For MWOR majors, at least 12 credit hours and a successful junior recital. For MUCO majors, at least 8 hours of applied composition and 6 hours of a primary instrument. For MUE majors, at least 10 hours. For MUA majors, at least 12 hours and a successful junior recital.

 

MUS 426

Elementary Music Methods and Evaluation

3 credit hours

A course designed to develop the students’ skills and sequence of instruction of musical activities within the elementary classroom. Prepares teacher candidates through the exploration and application of music methods, assessment, and instructional strategies.

 

MUS 427

Secondary Music Methods and Evaluation

2 credit hours

A course designed to introduce students to the management and instructional skills needed to direct a high school music program. Prepares teacher candidates to manage rehearsals and prepares them for instruction and assessment of non-performance classes.

 

MUS 441

String Instruments Class

1 credit hour

A study of the fundamentals of each of the stringed instruments of the orchestra. Includes methods and teaching materials as well as observation of Suzuki and other methods of teaching.

Instrument use fee: $55.

 

MUS 443

Conducting II: Choral

2 credit hours

Continues the study of choral conducting and the criteria for developing a choral music program. Includes classifying voices, developing choral tone, programming concerts, and researching a repertoire of music suitable for use in a variety of settings.

Prerequisite: MUS 333.

 

MUS 444

Conducting II: Instrumental

2 credit hours

Continues the study of instrumental conducting, establishing rehearsal techniques for instrumental classroom situations, and developing a usable repertoire for the elementary and secondary instrumental curriculum.

Prerequisite: MUS 333.

 

MUS 451

Church Music Administration

3 credit hours

A study of various methods of organizing and administering the music program of the church. Introduces materials and methods for teaching and/or supervising graded choirs, bell choirs, youth choirs, and adult choirs.

 

MUS 452

Music in Modern Worship

3 credit hours

A historical study of the nature and theological and Biblical foundations of worship practices in the Pentecostal/charismatic renewal movement, the place of music in that context, and the use of music in the evangelical church. Included is a study of the Biblical rationale for the type of worship called "praise and worship." Emphasizes training the student to be a worship leader.

 

MUS 461

Departmental Seminar

3 credit hours

A guided research seminar leading to the preparation of a project or paper in subject areas relating to the student’s major emphasis.

 

MUS 460

Professional Touring

3 credit hours

An in-depth study of concepts, equipment and techniques associated with the contemporary music tour. Lectures are supported by practical, hands-on application, including actual travel and tour dates

Prerequsiites: MUS 160, 165, 260, 310, and 389.

 

MUS 470

Cross-Cultural Internship

3 credit hours

A supervised, on-the-job experience with an approved cross-cultural ministry giving students practical experience and an opportunity to directly contribute to a Christian community. May include foreign travel with an approved ministry that provides a first-hand encounter with the culture of a people group and engagement with the worship life of a cross-cultural community.

Restrictions: Permission from student’s faculty advisor; must be in final year.

 

MUS 499

Senior Project/Paper

2-3 credit hours

Designed for seniors (possibly second semester juniors) studying under the guidance of a faculty advisor to produce a research paper or creative artistic project or paper or a research-oriented educational project. B.M.E. candidates may choose to complete a project/paper for two credit hours, instead of three, which would be approximately two-thirds of the full requirement and deal with a specific educational issue.

Prerequisites: B.M.E. majors need five semesters of the appropriate applied music primary; B.M. (sacred only) need seven semesters of the appropriate applied music primary; B.A. majors need four semesters of the appropriate applied music primary.

 

MUS 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Music Therapy (MUT)

 

MUT 153

Introduction to Music Therapy

2 credit hours

A survey of the scope and variety of practices in the music therapy profession. Covers topics such as the history of music therapy, current research, and methodologies used in treatment plans. Includes musical styles through composed songs and helps develop improvisional skills for use in music therapy sessions for a variety of clinical populations.

Corequisite: MUT 110.

 

MUT 156

Clinical Practicum Orientation

1 credit hour

Prepares the student for future clinical experiences through observation. Focuses on the use of the voice and singing in music therapy practice. Students explore the importance of the voice in a person’s development as well as the many ways to use the voice in music therapy.

Corequisite: MUT 105.

 

MUT 230

Psychology of Music

3 credit hours

Introduces the psychological and physiological responses to music and music perception. Musical behaviors and preferences are examined in relation to music learning and pedagogy.

 

MUT 256

Instrumental Skills for Music Therapy

1 credit hour

Study of the instrumental skills as applied in the music therapy setting utilizing keyboard, guitar, percussion, autoharp, electronic, and other instruments Designing music therapy interventions utilizing verious instruments and facilitating ensembles will be included. This course is open to music and music therapy students only.

 

MUT 303

Music Therapy I: Developmental

2 credit hours

An examination of music therapy techniques used in the special education setting and currnet legislation related to education and care of students with disabilities.

Prerequisites: MUT 153 and 156.

Corequisite: MUT 306.

 

MUT 306

Clinical I: Developmental

1 credit hour

Supervised pre-clinical experience in community settings; each semester of study is correlated with the population being considered in the corresponding core music therapy course. Includes not only music therapy knowledge and skills, but also how to use them to make a difference in the community to improve the quality of life. (Requires a minimum of 12 documented hours of community engagement.)

Prerequisites: MUT 153 and 156.

Corequisite: MUT 303.

 

MUT 353

Music Therapy II: Geriatrics

2 credit hours

A study of music therapy techniques used with individuals in geriatric settings. Examines issues concerning the use of music therapy within this population. (This is a writing enhanced course in which writing is used as a learning tool.) Emphasizes technical writing skills necessary in the field of music therapy.

Prerequisites: MUT 153 and 156.

Corequisite: MUT 356.

 

MUT 356

Clinical II: Geriatrics

1 credit hour

Supervised pre-clinical experience in community settings; each semester of study is correlated with the population being considered in the corresponding core music therapy course. Includes not only music therapy knowledge and skills, but also how to use them to make a difference in the community to improve the quality of life. (Requires a minimum of 12 documented hours of community engagement.)

Prerequisites: MUT 153 and 156.

Corequisite: MUT 353.

 

MUT 403

Music Therapy III: Psychiatric

2 credit hours

A study of music therapy procedures used with individuals in psychiatric settings. Examines issues concerning the use of music therapy within this population. (This is a writing enhanced course in which writing is used as a learning tool.) Emphasizes technical writing skills necessary in the field of music therapy.

Prerequisites: MUT 153 and 156.

Corequisite: MUT 406.

 

MUT 406

Clinical III: Psychiatric

1 credit hour

Supervised pre-clinical experience in community settings; each semester of study is correlated with the population being considered in the corresponding core music therapy course. Includes not only music therapy knowledge and skills, but also how to use them to make a difference in the community to improve the quality of life. (Requires a minimum of 12 documented hours of community engagement.)

Prerequisites: MUT 153 and 156.

Corequisite: MUT 403.

 

MUT 453

Music Therapy IV: Med/Rehab

2 credit hours

Examination of music therapy in neurologic rehabilitation and medicine. Presentation of research findings in clinical topic areas such as use of music is gait training, sensorimotor processing, speech/language rehabilitation, Hospice/Palliative care, and general medical settings. Application of theories and research findings in neuroloigic music therapy and music in medicine through practice and demonstration of therapeutic techniques.

Prerequisites: MUT 153 and 156.

Corequisite: MUT 456.

 

MUT 456

Clinical IV: Med/Rehab

1 credit hour

Supervised pre-clinical experience in community settings; each semester of study is correlated with the population being considered in the corresponding core music therapy course. Includes not only music therapy knowledge and skills, but also how to use them to make a difference in the community to improve the quality of life. (Requires a minimum of 12 documented hours of community engagement.)

Prerequisites: MUT 153 and 156.

Corequisite: MUT 453.

 

MUT 470

Music Therapy Research/Methods

3 credit hours

An introduction to descriptive, experimental, philosophical, qualitative, and historical research in music therapy, with particular emphasis on principles of scientific methodology in relation to music therapy theory and practice, data collection, research design, and efective research procedures. Students will prepare critques of research material and will be guided in designing original research projects related to their own area of interest. Instructional methodology will include interactive lecture and discussion as well as student research presentations.

Prerequisites: MUT 153 and 203.

 

MUT 480

Music Therapy Internship

3 credit hours

This course provides in-depth supervised clinical training at the professional level. The intership is designed and/or selected to meet the individual needs of the student. This requires joint planning by the academic faculty, the internship supervisor, and the student, as well as continuous communication throughout the student’s placement. After finishing all of the music therapy courswork in the bachelor’s program, students must pass a comprehensive exit interview. Failure of the comprehensive exit interview will result in a student not being enrolled for MUT 480. Prior to beginning their internship, students meet with the Director of Music Therapy to update individualized program plan and to complete the comprehensive exit interview and internship agreement.

 

 

Nursing (NUR)

 

NUR 110

Called to Care: Theory

1 credit hour

Introduces the beginning student to the Theory of Nursing for the Whole Person and to the nursing profession within the context of a Christian worldview. Address historical heritage, current professional environments, and future trends.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the nursing program.

Course fee: $185.

 

NUR 111

Called to Care: Terminology

1 credit hour

Introduces the beginning student to the study of medical terminology.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the nursing program.

 

NUR 112

Called to Care: Dosage Calculation

1 credit hour

Introduction to calculating medication dosages for the professional nurse. Includes reviewing basic math concepts involved in ratio/proportion equation, identifying current medication abbreviations and notation rules, understanding common equivalency and metric conversions, reading medication labels, measuring amounts in syringes, and solving basic dosage calculations for a one time dose when given a drug order and drug label.

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the nursing program.

 

NUR 202

Foundations of Nursing

5 credit hours

Introduces the basic principles of professional nursing. Emphasizes communication skills and the application of selected concepts within a variety of clinical settings. Presents concepts and skills within the framework of the Theory of Nursing for the Whole Person.

Prerequisites: NUR 200, 230, 300, and satisfactory progression on B.S.N. degree plan.

Lab fee: $425

 

NUR 220

Health Promotion and Culture

2 credit hours

Introduces concepts of theory development in nursing as a foundation for nursing practice and nursing from a Christian worldview. Analyzes select nursing and related theories and their relevance to practice, education, and research. Students select a theoretical or conceptual framework and relate it to their nursing practice. Special emphasis is placed on the Theory of Nursing for the Whole Person. (Offered online.)

Prerequisite: Admission to the RN to BSN program.

 

NUR 230

Pathophysiology I

3 credit hours

Provides basic knowledge of pathophysiological processes of the body including disease states and the effects of these disruptions on related body systems. Critical thinking and clinical judgment are integrated to provide the basis for understanding the interrelatedness of body systems and needed action in altered physiologic states across the life-span.

Prerequisite: PHS 223.

Corequisites: NUR 300 and PHS 224.

Lab fee: $425.

 

NUR 300

Health Assessment I

3 credit hours

Prepares the nursing student to perform comprehensive physical health assessments across the lifespan. Includes ways to integrate mental and spiritual assessment skills in a culturally sensitive approach while evaluating health status. Uses lecture/discussion, small groups sessions, and simulated laboratory experiences for practice of assessment skills that are performed in nursing practice.

Prerequisites: PHS 223.

Corequisite: NUR 230 and PHS 224.

 

NUR 301

Pharmacotherapeutics I

3 credit hours

A study of the theoretical and clinical application of basic pharmacological principles that address pharmacologic agents from the perspective of major drug classifications. Reviews medication administration, dosage calculation, and critical thinking skills specific to professional nursing practice.

Prerequisites: NUR 230, 300; PHS 223, 224.

Corequisites: NUR 202, PHS 223, 224.

 

NUR 304

Community Mental Health Nursing

4 credit hours

Addresses the mental health of individuals, families, and communities with emphasis on facilitating the quest for wholeness. Theory and practice are directed toward promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health.

Prerequisites: NUR 202, 230, 300, 301.

 

NUR 305

Patterns of Health and Illness I

4 credit hours

Applies nursing theory, scientific principles, and critical thinking skills to promote, maintain, and restore the patterns of health of individuals and families. Emphasizes pulmonary, cardiovascular, and hematological systems across the lifespan. Includes medical-surgical clinical experiences in diverse acute care and community environments.

Prerequisites: NUR 202, 230, 300, 301.

Lab fee: $425.

 

NUR 306

Patterns of Health and Illness II

Families and Children

3 credit hours

Integrates nursing theory, scientific principles, and critical thinking into professional nursing practice for the care of individuals and families. Focuses on the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of wholeness for adults and children. Clinical assignments include experiences in both pediatric and community settings.

Prerequisites: NUR 230, 301, 304, 305.

 

NUR 308

Patterns of Health and Illness II

Adults

4 credit hours

Integrates nursing theory, scientific principles, and critical thinking into professional nursing practice for the care of individuals and families. Focuses on the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of wholeness for adults. Clinical assignments include experiences in adult acute care settings.

Prerequisites: NUR 230, 301, 304, 305.

Lab fee: $425.

 

NUR 310

Professional Nursing Practice Seminar

0-6 credit hours

An investigation of different aspects of professional nursing opportunities within their medical organizations as well as their local and state nursing communities. Students analyze selected elements of the nursing profession as well as participate in professional nursing activities and indentify and formulate their own goals for selected assignments. (Offered online.)

Prerequisite: Admission to the RN to BSN program.

Corequisite: Progression on the RN to BSN degree plan requirements.

 

NUR 320

Health Promotion and Culture

2 credit hours

Provides an understanding of culturally competent health promotion and disease prevention strategies as a foundation for nursing practice. Incorporates health promotion and disease prevention interventions at the primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention. Encourages students to critique and evaluate models and theories of health promotion with multicultural populations and to integrate a cultural assessment framework to their nursing practice. (Offered online.)

 

NUR 330

EBP and Health Informatics

2 credit hours

Provides an understanding of evidence-based practice and health informatics, examines the best evidence, and translates the evidence into nursing and health care practice. Equips students with the skills needed to search Internet databases to obtain information and identify evidence-based practice policies and to evaluate their relevance to practice, education, and research. Integrates nursing science with computer informatics and technology to identify, gather, synthesize, and manage information. (Offered online.)

Prerequisite: Admission to the RN to BSN program.

Corequisite: NUR 320.

 

NUR 400

Patterns of Health and Illness III

4 credit hours

Applies nursing theory and practice toward individuals whose patterns of health and illness have been altered by their internal and external environments. Focuses on specific complex care concepts as well as the interrelatedness of maintaining and restoring wholeness and harmony within the mind, body, and spirit. Analyzes the roles of the nurse and nurse specialist as provider and manager of care. Clinical experiences provide the opportunity to examine leadership skills required to manage a group of patients in the acute care setting.

Prerequisites: NUR 230, 300, 301, 305, 307.

 

NUR 403

Patterns of Community Health Nursing

4 credit hours

A study of the principles of community nursing theory and Christian, professional, and social values for professional nursing practice. Students synthesize professional practice issues in caring for individuals, families, and groups in diverse community clinical environments. Emphasizes writing skills in both pedagogy and assessment of student learning. (This is a writing intensive course.)

Prerequisite: NUR 307.

 

NUR 405

Patterns of Leadership

6 credit hours

A study of leadership processes in nursing. Studies standards and quality of care in view of measures to effect change within the community. Applies leadership skills in a variety of community settings and culminates in the presentation of a student-designed community project. Students learn by utilizing and analyzing group process in various roles.

Prerequisites: NUR 400, 403, 499.

 

NUR 406

Patterns of Health and Illness IV

6 credit hours

Covers high acuity nursing as it applies to individuals whose patterns of health and illness have been altered in both their internal and external environments. Synthesizes nursing knowledge and advanced skills in caring for individuals, families, and communities experiencing crisis. Focuses on development of leadership skills required for effective communication. Clinical experiences take place in critical care areas as well as in a variety of high acuity settings as the student prepares for the transition of student to nurse.

Prerequisite: NUR 400, 403, 499.

Lab fee: $425.

 

NUR 430

Patterns of Childbearing

4 credit hours

Nursing theory, scientific principles, and critical thinking skills are utilized to promote, maintain, and restore the patterns of health of individuals and families experiencing child bearing in diverse environments. Culturally sensitive care is emphasized in reproductive health, antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum, and neonatal nursing. Clinical focuses on birthing and immediate postpartum nursing of the family unit in acute care setting and selected community and maternal-child experiences.

Prerequisites: NUR 200, 202, 230, 300, 301, 304, 305, 307.

Lab fee: $425.

 

NUR 440

Advanced Pathophysiology

3 credit hours

Knowledge of pathophysiologic processes of the body including disease states and their effects on related body systems. Critical thinking and clinical judgment are integrated to provide the basis for understanding the interrelatedness of body systems and needed action in altered physiologic states across the life-span. Content adapted to practicing RNs.

 

NUR 450

Advanced Health Assessment

3 credit hours

A comprehensive review of physical health assessment across the life span as well as assessment skills related to psychosocial and spiritual status. Emphasizes cultural sensitivity toward patients. Content adapted for practicing RNs.

 

NUR 460

Advanced Pharmacotherapeutics

3 credit hours

A study of pharmacology within the framework of major drug classifications. Emphasizes critical thinking skills related to administration and patient responses. Content adapted for practicing RNs.

 

NUR 477

NCLEX-RN Review

2 credit hours

A review of all major nursing content from the perspective of the nursing process. Students assess their own strengths and weaknesses of nursing knowledge through diagnostic tools and formulate a plan for areas of needed growth.

Prerequisites: Completion of sophomore, junior, and fall semester senior-level nursing courses,

Corequisite: Enrollment in senior-level spring courses.

 

NUR 479

Special Topics

3 credit hours

Offers a study of topics that meet students’ specific needs. Provides options for individual or group study.

 

NUR 497

Scholarship in Nursing

2 credit hours

Assists in the development of the student’s knowledge and understanding of scholarly nursing practice. Covers scholarly writing, professional presentations, career goals, graduate education, and current and projected nursing trends. Students also develop career goals. (Offered online.)

Prerequisites: Acceptance to the RN to BSN program; NUR 220.

 

NUR 498

Research/Senior Paper I

2 credit hours

Emphasizes qualitative research methods and explores nursing research as it relates to nursing science for evidence-based practice. Students identify research topics of clinical significance, conceptualize an appropriate research design, and use research protocols to address the study purpose. Results in preliminary findings about a topic of interest (Honors section available.)

Prerequisites: COMP 303 and MAT 232.

 

NUR 499

Research/Senior Paper II

2 credit hours

Students finalize research project started in NUR 498.

Emphasis shifts to quantitative research designs. Includes a literature synthesis related to research topic. Findings result in evidence-based conclusions and implications for clinical practice, education, and future research. (Honors section available--NUR 499H.)

Prerequisite: NUR 498.

 

NUR 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Nutrition (NUT)

 

NUT 201

Nutrition

3 credit hours

A study of the basic principles of nutrition, including the chemical characteristics of nutrients for their functions in the human body, and the determination of nutritional requirements for individuals during growth, pregnancy, lactation, old age, and other special conditions. (Does not count towards the mathematics/science general education requirement.)

Prerequisite: One semester of biology or chemistry.

 

NUT 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)

 

PHIL 299

Philosophy of Science

3 credit hours

A basic study of the philosophy of science, which includes a general understanding of philosophy and its impact on the natural sciences. Emphasizes the science and philosophy of origins, scientific ethics, Western scientific thought and its impact on Christian thought and practice, and formulation of a charismatic, evangelical response and perspective on the Western scientific enterprise. (Cross listed with HONR 102.)

 

PHIL 302

Introduction to Philosophy

3 credit hours

An introduction to the major problems of philosophy with ancient and modern proposals of solutions. Emphasizes notable Christian thinkers.

 

PHIL 401

Ethics

3 credit hours

A Christian perspective on the science of human duty and the major problems encountered. Surveys both ancient and modern solutions.

 

PHIL 470

Philosophy of Religion

3 credit hours

An inquiry into the nature of religious faith and life from the philosophical point of view. Includes the nature, function, and value of religious faith; the validity of the claims of religious knowledge; the relationship of faith and ethics; the problem of evil; revealed versus natural religion; the nature of the human spirit and its relationship to God; the nature and value of prayer; and the place of religious faith in modern society.

 

PHIL 473

Theology and Philosophy in Modern Culture

3 credit hours

A study of the theological and philosophical positions of modern thinkers that most affect Christian life and thought, particularly post-modernism and the New Age philosophy, as well as new Christian responses to current theologies and ideas that have developed in recent times. Includes various schools of thought and specific theologians and philosophers, analyzes arguments, and composes Christian responses.

 

Professional Education (PED)

Note: Most upper division PED courses have a prerequisite of admission to the Professional Educational Program.

 

PED 100

Education Seminar

0 credit hours

Provides an opportunity for candidates to hear special speakers from current, relevant areas, such as the State Department of Education and State Commission. (Required every semester.)

Course fee: $30.

 

PED 111

Field-Based Experience—Elementary

1 credit hour

An opportunity for students with a prospective teaching career to observe and participate in an actual elementary classroom setting for a minimum of 30 hours.

Corequisite: PED 203.

 

PED 121

Field-Based Experience—Secondary

1 credit hour

An opportunity for students with a prospective teaching career to observe and participate in an actual secondary classroom setting for a minimum of 30 hours.

Corequisite: PED 203.

 

PED 203

Foundations and Methods of Education

3 credit hours

An introduction to education, acquainting the student with the history, philosophy, profession, procedures, and practices of American education in relation to social, political, religious, and economic factors. Examines significant current issues and Biblical principles of teaching. Emphasizes individual and group career planning.

Corequisite: PED 111 or 121.

Course fee: $25.

 

PED 222

School Health Care

1 credit hour

A course providing the professional education major with a knowledge of medical conditions, both acute and chronic, that occur in both primary and secondary schools. Introduces both federal and state laws pertaining to health in the school environment. Discusses various social issues that can influence a student’s physical and mental well-being. (Cross listed with GPED 502.)

 

PED 305

Pedagogy I

4 credit hours

A study of cultural diversity combined with the knowledge of English language learners and students with disabilities. Uses the teacher candidates’ knowledge of diversity and apply it through technology in the classroom to educate all learners. Includes a 20 hour practicum.

Prerequisites: PED 203 and either PED 111 or 121

Restriction: Major in K-12 or secondary education.

 

PED 306

Pedagogy II

4 credit hours

A study of human life development from conception through adolescence with more emphasis on middle school and secondary school students. Management of classroom routines and behavior interwoven into the course with instruction on teaching reading in the content areas. Includes a 20-hour practicum.

Restriction: Major in K-12 or secondary education.

 

PED 313

Human Growth and Development

3 credit hours

A study of human life from conception through adolescence. Emphasizes the continuity of developmental phases of infants, children, and adolescents, delineating the interrelationships among various aspects of development—biological, cognitive, emotional, social. (Cross listed with GPED 513.)

 

PED 361

Professional Education Seminar/Portfolio

0-1 credit hour

Aids student teachers in the completion of a professional portfolio that fulfills requirements of the College of Education and reflects competencies required for teaching licensure in the State of Oklahoma. (Cross listed with GPED 571.)

Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program or education minor.

Corequisite: Student teaching internship.

 

PED 363

Educational Technology

3 credit hours

Focuses on the selection, preparation, use and sources of media and computer technologies for future teachers. (Cross listed with GPED 563.)

Educational technology fee: $25.

 

PED 372

Classroom Management and Educational Law

3 credit hours

A study of the various approaches in behavior management. Emphasizes behavior modification techniques. Introduces teacher candidates to token learning principles and how they apply to behavior management in the classroom. Provides the opportunity for the study of the relationships between students, parents, teachers, schools, and federal, state, and local government with an emphasis on the legal framework with which each participant must interact. (Cross listed with GPED 572.)

 

PED 382

Educational Assessment

2-3 credit hours

Theory and application of educational evaluation and assessment including evaluation for planning and instruction; construction and evaluation of classroom tests; test values and limitations; evaluation and administration of standardized tests; portfolio development and evaluation; and grading and reporting procedures. (Cross listed with GPED 582.)

 

PED 401

Instructional Methods and Strategies: Elementary, Early Childhood, and Special Education

3 credit hours

A course assisting students in becoming reflective practitioners by exploring current issues in elementary education. Students learn and utilize various research-based instructional techniques, planning strategies, methods, and assessment practices for elementary schools.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program.

Course fee: $25.

 

PED 407

Elementary Writing Methods

1 credit hour

A course on writing workshop techniques for the elementary classroom teacher. Focuses on using writing purposefully as a tool for thinking and problem-solving across the curriculum.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program

Restriction: Senior standing.

 

PED 409

Instructional Methods and Strategies: Secondary and K-12

3 credit hours

A course assisting students in becoming reflective practitioners by exploring current issues in secondary education. Students learn and utilize various research-based instructional techniques, planning strategies, methods, and assessment practices for secondary schools. (Cross listed with GPED 641.)

 

PED 450

Student Teaching: Away

4-10 credit hours

In-class observation, teacher assistance, and student teaching under the professional supervision of a university supervisor and a cooperating teacher in a school outside the Tulsa area. Teacher candidates engage in both curricular and extracurricular programs. Includes theories of education evaluation and testing. (Cross listed with GPED 650.)

Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program and acceptance of student teaching application

Restriction: Permission of the dean.

Course fee: $1300.

 

PED 465

Student Teaching: Early Childhood

4-5 credit hours

In-class observation, teacher assistance, and student teaching under the professional supervision of a university supervisor and a cooperating teacher in an early childhood classroom. Teacher candidates engage in both curricular and extracurricular programs. Includes theories of education evaluation and testing. (Cross listed with GPED 665.)

Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program and acceptance of student teaching application.

Corequisite: PED 361.

 

PED 475

Student Teaching: Elementary

4-10 credit hours

In-class observation, teacher assistance, and student teaching under professional supervision of a university supervisor and a cooperating teacher in an elementary school. Students engage in both curricular and extracurricular programs. Includes theories of education evaluation and testing. (Cross listed with GPED 675.)

Prerequisite or corequisite: PED 361.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Professional Education Program; acceptance of Student Teaching Application.

 

PED 485

Student Teaching: 7-9

4-5 credit hours

Seven weeks (full-time) in-class observation, teacher assistance, and student teaching under professional supervision of a cooperating teacher in a junior high or middle school and a university supervisor. Students engage in both curricular and extracurricular programs. Includes theories of education evaluation and testing. (Cross listed with GPED 685.)

Prerequisite or corequisite: PED 361.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Professional Education Program; acceptance of Student Teaching Application.

 

PED 490

Directed Study

1-4 credit hours

A course designed to provide the student with an opportunity to select readings in education that pertain to the degree program. Special activities and/or projects may be suggested by the professor.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Education Program.

 

PED 495

Student Teaching: 10-12

4-5 credit hours

Seven weeks (full-time) in-class observation, teacher assistance, and student teaching under professional supervision of a cooperating teacher in a high school and a university supervisor. Students engage in both curricular and extracurricular programs. Includes theories of education evaluation and testing. (Cross listed with GPED 695.)

Prerequisite or corequisite: PED 361.

Prerequisites: Admission to the Professional Education Program; acceptance of Student Teaching Application.

 

PED 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

PreHealth Professions (PHP)

 

PHP 100

Prehealth Seminar

1 credit hour

Provides guidance for all students planning to seek admission to health professions schools, such as medicine, dentistry, optometry, podiatry, pharmacy, and physical therapy. Especially designed for prehealth students to take early in their academic careers

 

PHP 400

Medical Seminar

1 credit hour

Introduces premedical students to the arena of medicine, specifically family practice medicine. Incorporates discussion of medical cases, seminar presentations from authorities in special fields, and mentoring by physicians.

Prerequisites: Premed junior or senior, a 3.4 or better GPA, and approval by the health professions advisor and course coordinator.

 

PHP 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Physiology (PHs)

 

PHS 223

Human Anatomy Lecture

3 credit hours

An introductory course that presents the structure of the human organism from the cellular level to the organismal level. Includes the study of skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, urinary, respiratory, endocrine, nervous, reproductive, gastrointestinal, and lymphatic systems. (Does not count toward a major in biology.)

Prerequisite: One semester of general biology or chemistry with lab.

Corequisite: PHS 223 Lab.

 

PHS 223L

Human Anatomy Laboratory

1 credit hour

An introductory laboratory course that presents the structure of the human organism from the cellular level to the organismal level. Models and cadavers are used to study the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, urinary, respiratory, endocrine, nervous, reproductive, gastrointestinal, and lymphatic systems. (Meets for one 3-hour lab per week. Does not count toward a major in biology.)

Corequisite: PHS 223.

Lab fee: $75.

 

PHS 224

Human Physiology Lecture

3 credit hours

Studies the structures of human cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems as well as their functions, processes, integration and control. Areas covered include the circulatory, endocrine, blood and respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. (Meets the requirements of students in nursing, medical technology, health and physical education. Does not count toward a major in biology.)

Prerequisites: PHS 223 and 223L.

Corequisite: PHS 224L.

 

PHS 224L

Human Physiology Laboratory

1 credit hour

Emphasizes physiological systems and principles. Involves the use of microscope slides, audiovisuals, electrocardiograph and myograph equipment, respirometers, and various clinical apparati and tests for the purpose of exploring the physiological processes. (Meets for one 3-hour lab per week. Does not count toward a major in biology.)

Corequisite: PHS 224.

Lab fee: $50.

 

PHS 999

1-6 credit hours

Course transferred to apply to an ORU major or minor. (More than one course can be transferred under this number.)

Restriction: Approval by petition to department chair.

 

 

Physics (PHY)

 

PHY 101

General Physics I Lecture

3 credit hours

An introduction to the laws and principles of physics including mechanics, heat, and sound. (Primarily for liberal arts and biological science students. Not applicable to a physics major or minor.)

Prerequisite: High school algebra.

Corequisite: PHY 101L.

 

PHY 101L

General Physics I Laboratory

1 credit hour

Lab exercises to supplement PHY 101 Lecture.

Corequisite: PHY 101.

Lab fee: $75.

 

PHY 102

General Physics II Lecture

3 credit hours

A continuation of PHY 101 Lecture. Includes electricity, magnetism, light, and modern physics.

Prerequisite: PHY 101.

Corequisite: PHY 102L.

 

PHY 102L

General Physics II Laboratory

1 credit hour

Lab exercises to supplement PHY 102.

Corequisite: PHY 102.

Lab fee: $75.

 

PHY 111

Physics I Lecture

3 credit hours

Introduction of vector algebra: calculus-based studies of mechanics, heat, and thermodynamics.

Prerequisite: MAT 201.

Corequisite: PHY 111L.

 

PHY 111L

Physics I Laboratory

1 credit hour

Experiments in mechanics and heat to supplement PHY 111.

Corequisite: PHY 111.

Lab fee: $75.

 

PHY 112

Physics II Lecture

3 credit hours

Calculus-based studies of wave motion, sound, electricity, magnetism, and light. Includes an introduction to modern physics.

Prerequisite: PHY 111.

Corequisite: PHY 112L.

 

PHY 112L

Physics II Laboratory

1 credit hour

Experiments in wave motion, sound, electricity and magnetism.

Corequisite: PHY 112.

Lab fee: $75.

 

PHY 211

Introduction to Modern Physics Lecture

3 credit hours

An introductory treatise of the theory of relativity, atomic structure, matter waves, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, solid-state theory, radioactivity, and nuclear reactions.

Prerequisite: PHY 112.

Corequisite: PHY 211L.

 

PHY 211L

Introduction to Modern Physics Laboratory

1 credit hour

Experiments in classical and quantum physics, including atomic and nuclear spectroscopy, radioactivity, solid-state physics, and interferometry.

Corequisite: PHY 211.

Lab fee: $75.

 

PHY 302

Heat and Thermodynamics

3 credit hours

A course in thermodynamics including the first and second laws, thermometry, kinetic theory, thermodynamic property relations, ideal gas mixtures, and elementary power and refrigeration cycle analyses. Includes lab experiments. (Cross listed with EGR 231.)

Prerequisites: PHY 111, 111L and MAT 202.

Course fee: $55.

 

PHY 311

Mechanics I: Statics

3 credit hours

A study of the statics of particles and rigid bodies, equilibrium of rigid bodies; concentrated and distributed force systems; shear and bending moment stresses in beams and other rigid bodies; force analysis of machines, frames, and trusses; force resultants using vectors in two and three dimensions; friction forces; center of gravity; moments of inertia. (Cross listed with EGR 221.)

Prerequisites: PHY 111, 111L and MAT 202.

Course fee: $55.

 

PHY 312

Mechanics II: Dynamics

3 credit hours

A study of the dynamics of particles and systems of particles; rectilinear kinematics and curvilinear motion, relative motion of two particles, Newton’s laws of motion; work and energy; impulse and momentum; planar kinematics and kinetics of a rigid body; and vibrations. (Cross listed with EGR 222.)

Prerequisite: PHY 311.

Course fee: $35.

 

PHY 321

Electronics I Lecture

3 credit hours

An introduction to the basic concepts underlying the analysis and design of circuits using diodes, transistors, and Field Effect Transistors. Includes bias stability of amplifiers, design of power amplifiers and power supplies, and frequency response of active circuits. (Cross listed with EE 321.)

Prerequisite: EGR 210.

Corequisite: PHY 321L.

 

PHY 321L

Electronics I Laboratory

1 credit hour

The companion lab to PHY 321 Lecture. Covers measurements of the characteristics of semi-conductor devices and the analysis and design of single-stage BJT and FET amplifiers. (Cross listed with EE 321L.)

Corequisite: PHY 321.

Lab fee: $55.

 

PHY 331

Electromagnetic Theory

3 credit hours

A study of electrostatics, electric and magnetic circuits and fields, electromagnetic induction, and Maxwell’s equations in differential and integral forms. (Cross listed with EE 360.)

Prerequisites: PHY 112 and MAT 211.

Course fee: $55.

 

PHY 334

Vibrations and Sound

3 credit hours

An analytical and qualitative treatment of mechanical waves in fluids and solids and of vibrating mechanical systems.

Prerequisites: PHY 112 and MAT 211.

Course fee: $55.

 

PHY 341L

Advanced Physics Laboratory

1-3 credit hours

Selected experiments in physics either using lab equipment or a computer. (Three hours per week in lab work to be done for each credit hour.)

Prerequisite: PHY 211.

Restriction: Permission from instructor required.

Lab fee: $75.

 

PHY 401

Optics

3 credit hours

A study of geometrical and physical optics, optical devices and materials, electromagnetism, and applied laser optics.

Prerequisite: PHY 211.

Course fee: $75.

 

PHY 402

Quantum Mechanics

3 credit hours

An introduction to quantum mechanics and the application of Schrodinger’s equation to simple systems.

Prerequisites: PHY 211 and MAT 211.

Course fee: $55.

 

PHY 450

Special Topics

3 credit hours

Topics vary by semester.

Restriction: Approval of the department chair and instructor required.