College of Theology and Ministry

r. samuel thorpe, ph.d., interim dean

MISSION STATEMENT:

Oral Roberts University College of Theology and Ministry provides undergraduate and professional theological education for the equipping and training of men and women empowered by the Holy Spirit for effective leadership in the Christian church, ministries, and society. 

Faculty - Undergraduate

Jeffrey Lamp

Professor of New Testament

B.S., University of Oklahoma, 1983; M.Div., Oral Roberts University, 1990; Ph.D., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, 1995

Kerry Loescher

Instructor of Ministry and Leadership

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1995; M.A., 1997

William Lyons

Associate Professor of Old Testament Studies

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1979; M.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1989; Ph. D., Florida State University, 2003

Julie Ma

Associate Professor of Missions and Intercultural Studies

B.A., Asia Pacific Theological Seminary, 1982; M.A., Asia Pacific Theological Seminary, 1983; M.A., Fuller Theological Seminary, 1993; Ph.D., Fuller Theological Seminary, 1996

Eric Newberg

Associate Professor of Theology

B.A., University of Kansas, 1970; M.A., Pacific School of Religion, 1975; M.Div., North Park Theological Seminary, 1979; Ph.D., Regent University, 2008

James B. Shelton

Professor of New Testament

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1973; M.A., 1977; Ph.D., University of Stirling, Scotland, 1982

eloy h. NOLIVOS

Associate Professor of Practical Theology

B.A., West Coast College, 1991; M.Div., Pentecostal Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Regent University.

Lisa c. taylor

Instructor and Coordinator of Christian Caregiving and Counseling

B.A.S., Dallas Baptist University, 2002; M.Ed., University of North Texas, 2005; M.A. Oral Roberts University, 2012.

R. SAMUEL THORPE

Professor of Philosophy, Chair of the Undergraduate Theology Department of Theology , and Interim Dean of the College of Theology and Ministry.

B.A., University of  Arkansas, 1971; M.A., Oral Roberts University, 1981; Ph.D., University of Tulsa, 1989

Jeffrey K. Voth

Associate Professor of Practical Theology

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1984; M.A., Trinity Theological Seminary, 2002; M.Div., Oral Roberts University, 2006; D.Min., Denver Seminary, 2010.

 
       

 

Faculty - Graduate

James Barber

Assistant Professor of Practical Theology

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1974; M.Div. Oral Roberts University, 1991; D.Min. 1997.

James Breckenridge

Professor of Theology

B.A., Lee College, 1964; M.Div., Covenant Theological Seminary, 1968; Th.M., Trinity Divinity School, 1973; Th.D., Concordia Theological Seminary, 1991.

William Buker

Professor of Christian Counseling

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1982; M.Div., 1986; M.A., 1993; D.Min., 1998; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University, 2012.

Tim Ekblad

Assistant Professor of Practical Theology

B.A., North Central University, 1983; M.Div., Oral Roberts University, 1995; D.Min., 2000.

Edward Ewe

Instructor of Christian Counseling

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 2004; M.A., 2005.

Trevor Grizzle

Professor of New Testament

B.A., Lee College, 1975; M.Div., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1978; Ph.D., 1984.

Larry Hart

Professor of Theology

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1970; M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1973; Ph.D., 1978.

Cheryl L. Iverson

Associate Professor of Old Testament Studies

B.A., L.I.F.E. Bible College, 1968; M.A., Oral Roberts University, 1985; M. Phil., Drew University, 1989; Ph.D., 1996.

Wonsuk Ma

Distinguished Professor of Global Christianity

B.B.S., Asia Pacific Theological Seminary, 1981; M.Div., Far East Advanced School of Theology, 1983; Ph.D., Fuller Theological Seminary, 1996.

 
Thomson K. Mathew

Professor of Pastoral Care

B.S., Kerala University, 1971; M.Div., Yale Divinity School, 1975; S.T.M., 1977; D.Min., Oral Roberts University, 1986; Ed.D., Oklahoma State University, 1992.

William McDonald

Associate Professor of Old Testament

B.A.., Oral Roberts University, 1987; M.Div., 1991; M.A., 1992; M.A., University of Texas, 2000; Ph.D., 2002.

Sandra K. Richardson

Associate Professor of Christian Counseling

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1981; M.A., Oral Roberts University, 1990; Ed.D., 2008.

Raymond Smith

Associate Professor of Missions

B.S., Southwestern College of Christian Ministries, 1991; M.A., Oral Roberts University, 1993; D.Miss., Asbury Theological Seminary, 1999.

Daniel Thimell

Associate Professor of Theological-Historical Studies

B.A., Westmont College, 1974; M.Div., Fuller Seminary, 1978; Ph.D., University of Aberdeen, 1993.

John P. Thompson.

Assistant Professor of Missiology and Leadership

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1990; M.A., Oral Roberts University, 1992; D.S.L, Regent University, 2007.

R. SAMUEL THORPE

Professor of Philosophy, Chair of the  Undergraduate Theology Department of Theology , and Interim Dean of the College of Theology and Ministry.

B.A., University of  Arkansas, 1971; M.A., Oral Roberts University, 1981; Ph.D., University of Tulsa, 1989.

Andrea Walker

Professor of Christian Counseling

 B.S., Oral Roberts University 1993; M.S., Southern Nazarene University, 1995; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University, 2002.

Edward Watson

Professor of Biblical Literature and Practical Theology

B.A., Southern Baptist College, 1987; M.A., Oral Roberts University, 1994; Th.M., Duke University Divinity School, 1996; Ph.D., Baylor University, 2005.

William M. Wilson

President and Professor of Theology

B.S., Western Kentucky University, 1979; M.A., Pentecostal Theological Seminary , 1998; D.Min., Pentecostal Theological Seminary, 2012.

Brad H. Young

Professor of Biblical Literature

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1978; M.A., Hebrew University, 1981; Ph.D., 1986.

 

 

Emeriti Faculty

Dr. Lillian Breckenridge

1988-2015

Dr. Oon-Chor Khoo

1977-1996

Dr. M. Robert Mansfield,

1978-2012

Dr. Angharad Ann Brandsford Young

1981-2013

     

  

Overview

Basic to the purpose of Oral Roberts University--a pre-eminent charismatic university--is its commitment to the historic Christian faith, to assist students in their quest for knowledge of their relationship to God and man and the universe. Students have opportunities to study abroad in Israel. The mission internship program is designed to provide practical experience in a mission environment where students can visit other countries for the summer or a full semester. Ministry internships are also available. The seminary offers M.DIV., M.A. (both academic and professonal), and D.MIN. degrees.

 

Accreditation

The Graduate School of Theology and Ministry is accredited by the Commission on Accredition of the Association of Theological Schools in the United states and Canada (ATS). The following degree programs are approved:

  • Master of Divinity
  • M.A. in Biblical Literature
  • M.A. in Theological/Historical Studies
  • M.A. in Christian Counseling
  • M.A. in Missions
  • M.A. in Practical Theology
  • Doctor of Ministry

Commission contact information is as follows:

The Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada

10 Summit Park Drive

Pittsburg, PA 15275

Telephone: 412-788-6505

Fax: 412-788-6510

Website: www.ats.edu

 

Statement of educational effectiveness

The Graduate School of Theology and Ministry measures its educational effectiveness through a comprehensive student learning assessment program, which determines student competencies in relationship to degree program goals.

 

UnderGraduate Theology Department

R. Samuel Thorpe, Ph.D., Chair

 

MISSION STATEMENT:

The Undergraduate Theology Department equips students with a Spirit-filled education in biblical, historical-theological, and pastoral studies in order to develop effective Christian leadership in the Church and global society.

 

Degree Programs

 

Biblical Literature (B.A.)

The greatest asset for effective integration of truth is a solid knowledge of the Bible. Therefore, courses in Biblical literature are designed to give students an understanding and appreciation of the Word of God and its application. The Biblical literature focus exposes students to a broad spectrum of hermeneutical and exegetical perspectives, tools, and methods so that they may interpret the Bible responsibly and perceptively within a theological-historical framework. Courses in Hebrew and Greek are intended to equip students in language skills needed for studies in the Old and New Testaments, as well as to give them a working knowledge of the Biblical languages.

Students who choose the Biblical literature major choose one of three concentrations. All three concentrations focus on the content of the Bible. English Bible covers the entire Bible; Old Testament emphasizes the content of the Old Testament with the acquisition of the Hebrew language; and the New Testament concentration emphasizes the content of the New Testament with the acquisition of the Greek language.

 

Christian Caregiving and Counseling (B.S.)

This major is designed to educate and equip students with the philosophy, methods, and resources suitable for professional or lay ministry, equipping students for application of knowledge and skills to a broad range of pastoral settings. Students gain an understanding of the foundational approaches to pastoral care, counseling, and an assessment of each approach’s suitability and adaptability for use in Christian ministry. Although this major does not grant the graduate a counseling license, this training does provide the basic skills necessary for lay counseling and pastoral care. It emphasizes a strong Biblical/theological foundation and provides well-balanced training in the theory and practice of pastoral ministry.

 

Global Ministry and the Marketplace (B.A.)

This major is designed to prepare stuents to minister in traditional and non-traditional ways in the global marketplace by comining missions and business. Coursework includes theology, ethics, apologetics, Bible, and missions and a required minor in business. The major is designed to equip business-minded students to be creative in their calling to have a global influence as they learn Biblically sound and theologically balanced ways to minister in local, global, and cross-cultural contexts. Students are prepared for careers in various business and leadership positions as well as church administration, missions, and pastoral and nonprofit leadership.

Some of the educational benefits of the program include the following: (1) integrating Biblical principles and business concepts for global ministry; (2) learning traditional and non-traditional ministry practices for the marketplace; (3) developing a creative ministry plan for global influence; (4) training in Biblically sound an dtheologically balanced marketplace ministry; and (5) preparing for local, global, and cross-cultural ministry.

 

Ministry and Leadership (B.A.)

According to Ephesians 4:11, evangelists, pastors, and teachers have been appointed in the Church to prepare God’s people for works of service so that the Body of Christ may be built up. The church ministries focus strives to meet the needs for training the personnel to fill these offices. Students are assisted in becoming competent ministers within the community of faith through the development of knowledge, attitudes, skills, and spiritual formation. The focus of such training is to enable students to equip lay people in the local church for works of ministry based on the Great Commission.

Students in this major choose one of six concentrations: (1) church administration, (2) evangelism and outreach, (3) local church pastor, (4) missions, (5) teaching ministries, and (6) youth ministry. Each concentration includes a cognate of hermeneutics, apologetics, research, systemic theology, and an Old or New Testament elective. This major provides the student with an indepth exploration of Christian leader within the context of professional ministry and equips the student for his or her calling within a wide variety of leadership roles within local church and para-church ministries.

 

historical and philosophical Studies (B.A.)

Christian maturity involves the ability to learn from the past, to think deeply, and to formulate an integrated and balanced Christian theology of life with clearly defined goals, purposes, and values.

This area emphasizes the essentials of Christian belief faithfully preserved by the ancient Church in the universally accepted creeds and clearly articulated by the great Christian thinkers of the past and present. Therefore, courses in history, theology, and philosophy seek to give students a comprehension of the Christian past and an understanding of the theological and philosophical dimensions of the Christian faith and its contemporary expressions. “Always be ready to give a defense to everyone who asks you a reason for the hope that is within you . . .” (I Peter 3:15). The 21st century will be filled with a multitude of worldview and ideas about the nature of reality and truth. Theological studies at ORU prepares students to go into the worlds of religious thought and practice to testify to the Truth.

 

Degree in Three

The Undergraduate Theology Department offers the Ministry and Leadership major that industrious students can complete in three years. Students with this major choose one of the following concentrations: Church Administration, Evangelism and Outreach, Local Church Pastor, Pastoral Care, Missions, or Youth and Family Ministries. Completing a major in three years involves taking courses in the summers, including the summer before a student’s freshman year. Degree plan sheets that show how the degrees can be completed in three years are available in the Undergraduate Theology Department.

 

Special Opportunities

 
Trips to Israel and Turkey

Every other year, students have the opportunity to accompany a professor to the Holy Land and/or Turkey to visit ancient cities, archaeological digs, and historical museums. These trips provide insight and background for Biblical studies and provide great experience for students.

 

Study Abroad

Students have the opportunity to spend a semester or two in Jerusalem for college credit and cultural study. Students may broaden their horizons and receive education unavailable in a standard American classroom setting.

 

Mission Trips

Each year ORU’s missions program offers students the chance to engage in a short-term mission trip and sends approximately 200 students to various destinations around the world. Week-long trips occur over fall and spring breaks and month-long trips are taken during the summer. Missions trips have taken ORU students to countries such as Brazil, India, Australia, Belize, Iceland, China, Honduras, Japan, and Guyana.

Students may contact ORU missions services for more information.

 

Fast-Track Program

The Fast Track Program allows ORU senior students to enroll concurrently in graduate courses and apply those hours toward a master’s degree. Students may register for a maximum of six semester hours of graduate courses per semester.

These students remain classified as undergraduates by the university and are billed the corresponding undergraduate tuition rate as long as enrollment remains between 12.0 and 18.5 credit hours. If enrollment is below 12.0 or exceeds 18.5 credit hours, they are billed the corresponding graduate per-credit-hour tuition rate. Students may earn up to 12 hours towards a graduate degree through the fast-track program. Graduate level courses taken through the fast-track program may not be used to fulfill undergraduate degree requirements.

ORU undergraduate theology students can be eligible to begin the M.A. fast track in graduate theology if they fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete a Fast-Track Program application form available in the College of Theology and Ministry.
  • Have completed a minimum of 90 semester hours of undergraduate coursework.
  • Have a minimum grade point average of 3.0.
  • Need less than a full course load for graduation.

More information is available from the Graduate Theology and Ministry Admissions Office.

 

M.A. Academic Track

ORU undergraduate theology students can be eligible to begin the M.A. academic track in graduate theology if they meet the following criteria: (1) majoring in Old Testament, New Testament, or Theological and Historical Studies; (2) a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA; and (3) an undergraduate theology professor’s recommendation. Students can complete an M.A. academic degree in one academic year, plus six hours in the summer between their undergraduate and graduate degrees. Students can receive up to 15 hours of advanced standing for undergraduate theology courses that have been completed with a “B” or better.

Students are required to complete an M.A. academic track application and submit it along with the letter of recommendation from an undergraduate theology professor to the College of Theology and Ministry graduate representative.

 

Awards

To reward excellence in acedemics, leadership, and Christian lifestyle, the Undergraduate Theology Department annually honors outstanding students by presenting the following awards:

Outstanding Theology Senior Awards: This recognizes the department’s most worthy graduating senior in each of the following areas: Biblical literature, historical and theological studies, ministry and leadership, global ministry and the marketplace and Christian caregiving and counseling. The overall oustanding graduate is selected by the faculty based on academic achievement, Christian service and Godly character.

Outstanding Theology Senior Paper: This recognizes the department’s best senior research project.

Zondervan/Oral Roberts University Greek , Hebrew and Theology Awards: Zondervan Publishing House recognizes outstanding achievement in the study of Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew and theology by awarding a Zondervan product and a commemorative medal and by arranging for the recipient’s name to be engraved on a plaque displayed in the department. To be eligible, the student must be a graduating senior in the Theology Department and must have completed the required courses for each award.

Biblical literature Major (BLit) Bachelor of Arts

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Bible (BIB 222, 261) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science (two lectures and two labs) 8

Mathematics 3

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315)

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, FIN 244, SOC 101, SOC 201, BUS 201, SOC 323, SWK 202, MUS 208)

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 62

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

Major*

BIB 499 Senior Paper 3

____

Major Core 3

 

*Students need to choose a concentration in English Bible, New Testament or Old Testament and corresponding cognate.

English Bible Concentration (EBC)

The English Bible concentration leads the student in an in-depth examination of the contents of both the Old and New Testament and exegesis of the English text. The student may opt to study the Biblical languages. Theological-historical courses are required in the cognate to enable the students to interpret the Bible within a sound theological-historical framework.

Concentration

BIB 362 Jesus and the Gospels 3

BIB 421 Pentateuch 3

BIB 438 Intertestamental Literature 3

BIB _____ Electives in Old Testament* 6

BIB _____ Electives in New Testament* 6

BIB _____ Elective in Old or New Testament 3

____

Concentration Total 27

*May include HIS 372 as an elective in either Old or New Testament.

Cognate

BIB 306 Hermeneutics 3

CHRM 305 Teaching the Bible 3

THE 217 Research Seminar 3

THE 313 Systematic Theology I 3

THE 461 History of Christianity I: Early Church 3

Choice of one of the following courses: 3

THE 303 Major Religions of the World

THE 415 Christian Apologetics

____

Cognate Total 18

Minor and/or Electives** 18

____

Degree Total 128

**One hour of electives may be met by a directed study or by one of the four credit hours from the 102 level of the foreign language general education requirement.

Old Testament and Judaic-Christian Studies Concentration (OTC)

The Old Testament concentration leads the student in an in-depth examination of the contents of the Old Testament and requires instruction in Biblical Hebrew and exegesis of the Hebrew text. Theological-Historical courses are required in the cognate to enable students to interpret the Bible within a sound theological-historical framework.

Concentration

BIB 311 Biblical Hebrew I 3

BIB 312 Biblical Hebrew II 3

BIB 319 Hebrew Exegesis 3

BIB 332 Old Testament Historical Books 3

BIB 421 Pentateuch 3

BIB 424 Hebrew Prophets 3

BIB 437 Psalms and Wisdom Literature 3

BIB _____ Old Testament elective 3

____

Concentration Total 27

Cognate

BIB 306 Hermeneutics 3

CHRM 305 Teaching the Bible 3

THE 217 Research Seminar 3

THE 313 Systematic Theology I 3

THE 461 History of Christianity I: Early Church 3

Choice of one of the following courses: 3

THE 303 Major Religions of the World

THE 415 Christian Apologetics

____

Cognate Total 18

Minor and/or Electives** 18

____

Degree Total 128

**One hour of electives may be met by a directed study or by one of the four credit hours from the 102 level of the foreign language general education requirement.

New Testament Concentration (NTC)

The New Testament concentration leads the student in an in-depth examination of the contents of the New Testament and requires instruction in Biblical Greek and exegesis of the Greek text. Theological-historical courses are required in the cognate to enable students to interpret the Bible within a sound theological-historical framework.

Concentration

BIB 251 Biblical Greek I 3

BIB 252 Biblical Greek II 3

BIB 346 Luke-Acts 3

BIB 351 Greek Exegesis 3

BIB 362 Jesus and the Gospels 3

BIB 364 Pauline Epistles 3

BIB 372 Johannine Literature 3

BIB _____ New Testament elective 3

____

Concentration Total 27

Cognate

BIB 306 Hermeneutics 3

CHRM 305 Teaching the Bible 3

THE 217 Research Seminar 3

THE 313 Systematic Theology I 3

THE 461 History of Christianity I: Early Church 3

Choice of one of the following courses: 3

THE 303 Major Religions of the World

THE 415 Christian Apologetics

____

Cognate Total 18

Minor and/or Electives** 18

____

Degree Total 128

**One hour of electives may be met by a directed study or by one of the four credit hours from the 102 level of the foreign language general education requirement.

  

Christian Caregiving and Counseling Major (CCCN) Bachelor of Science

This major is designed to educate and equip students with the philosophy, methods, and resources suitable for lay ministry in a broad range of pastoral settings. (Does not lead to a counseling license.) This major is also offered via distance learning. More information is available in the Online and Lifelong Learning section of this catalog.

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 222, 261) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Mathematics (MAT 105) 3

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Laboratory Science (two lecture sna d two labs) 8

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315)

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: FIN 244, SOC 101, SOC 201, BUS 201, SOC 323, SWK 202, MUS 208)

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 56

Major

CCC 301 Introduction to Christian Caregiving 3

CCC 303 Issues and Identity of the Caregiver 3

CCC 321 Christian Approaches to Counseling 3

CCC 332 Lifespan Development 3

CCC 339 Developing Helping Skills 3

CCC 411 Practical Applications of Helping Skills 3

CCC 429 Substance Abuse 3

CCC 499 Senior Practicum/Project 3

Choice of three courses from the following list: 9

CCC 324 Foundations of Personality Development

CCC 405 Crisis Intervention

CCC 426 Assessment and Evaluation

PSY 338 Psychology of Abnormal Behavior

CHRM _____ Elective

CHRM _____ Elective

____

Major Total 36

Cognate

BIB 306 Hermeneutics 3

CHRM 305 Teaching the Bible 3

PHIL 401 Ethics 3

PSY 201 Principles of Psychology 3

THE 217 Seminar in Theological Research 3

THE 299 Introduction to Theology 3

____

Cognate Total 18

Social Science Minor 18

____

Degree Total 128

  

Global Ministry and the Marketplace Major (GMMP) Bachelor of Arts

This major is designed to prepare students to minister in traditional and non-traditional ways in the global marketplace by combining missions and business. Students will complete courses in Bible, theology, ethics, apologetics and missions with a required minor in business. The major is designed to equip business minded students to be creative in their calling to have a global influence as they learn biblically sound and theologically balanced ways to minister in local, global and cross-cultural contexts. Students will be prepared for careers in various business and leadership positions as well as church administration, missions, pastoral and non-profit leadership.

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Bible (BIB 222, 261) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science (two lectures and two labs) 8

Mathematics 3

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315)

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, FIN 244, SOC 101, SOC 201, BUS 201, SOC 323, SWK 202, MUS 208)

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 62

Major

CHRM 302 Christian Leadership 3

GMMP 499 Senior Paper 3

MGT 465 Administration of Non-Profit Organizations 3

MISS 325 Introduction to Christan Missions 3

MISS 350 Missions and Culture 3

MISS 396 Internship Preparation 1

MISS 398 Global Ministry & the Marketplace Internship 2

MISS 401 Ministry and Business 3

MKT 361 International Marketing 3

PHIL 401 Ethics 3

Choice of one of the following courses: 3

THE 303 Major Religions of the World

THE 403 Global Christianity

____

Major Total 30

Cognate

BIB 306 Hermeneutics 3

BIB Elective 3

THE 217 Research Seminar 3

THE 299 Introduction to Theology 3

THE 415 Christian Apologetics 3

Choice of one of the following two courses: 3

CHRM 305 Teaching the Bible

CHRM 340 Sermon Preparation and Preaching

____

Cognate Total 18

General Business Minor** 18

____

Degree Total 128

**Students with this major must declare a general business minor. Requirements for this program can be found in the College of Business section of the catalog.

  

Ministry and Leadership Major (ML) Bachelor of Arts

This major provides the student with an indepth exploration of Christian leadership within the context of professional ministry and better equips the student for his or her calling by offering a choice of concentrations: (1) educational ministries of the church, (2) church administration, (3) evangelism and outreach, (4) local church pastor, (5) missions, or (6) youth and family ministries.
General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Bible (BIB 222, 261) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science (two lectures and labs) 8

Mathematics 3

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315)

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, FIN 244, SOC 101, SOC 201, BUS 201, SOC 323, SWK 202, MUS 208)

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 62

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

MAJOR*

CHRM or MISS 499** Senior Paper 3

____

Major Core 3

*Students need to choose a concentration in Church Administration, Evangelism and Outreach, Local Church Pastor, Missions or Youth and Family Ministries and corresponding cognate.

**Students pursuing the missions concentration enroll in MISS 499. All others enroll in CHRM 499.

Church Administration Concentration (CHAC)

This concentration is designed to educate and equip students to become church administrators. Students are trained in church administration, including organization, programming, aspects of leadership, and the relationship of the church to the denomination and society. They learn skills in the administration of non-profit organizations, principles of management and organizational behavior. Students also acquire skills in preaching and teaching the Bible. This major emphasizes a strong Biblical/theological foundation and provides well-balanced training in the theory and practice of pastoral ministry.

Concentration

CHRM 302 Christian Leadership 3

CHRM 398 Ministry Practicum 3

CHRM 460 Church Administration 3

MGT 130 Principles of Management 3

MGT 352 Organizational Behavior 3

MGT 465 Administration of Non-Profit Organizations

PHIL 401 Ethics 3

Choice of one of the following two courses: 3

CHRM 305 Teaching the Bible

CHRM 340 Sermon Preparation and Preaching

Choice of one of the following courses: 3

CHRM 307 Urban Outreach Ministries

CHRM 351 Team Ministry

____

Concentration Total 27

Cognate

BIB 306 Hermeneutics 3

BIB Old Testament elective 3

BIB New Testament elective 3

THE 217 Research Seminar 3

THE 299 Introduction to Theology 3

Choice of one of the following courses: 3

THE 303 Major Religions of the World

THE 415 Christian Apologetics

____

Cognate Total 18

Minor and/or Electives* 18

____

Degree Total 128

*One to two hours of electives may be met by a directed study or by one of the five credit hours from the 102 level of the foreign language requirement.

Evangelism and Outreach Concentration (EVOC)

This concentration is designed to prepare students for leadership and service in the professional capacity of itinerant evangelist or staff evangelist. It emphasizes a strong Biblical/theological foundation and provides well-balanced training in the theory and practice of evangelism.

Concentration

CHRM 302 Christian Leadership 3

CHRM 307 Urban Outreach Ministries 3

CHRM 335 Introduction to Evangelism 3

CHRM 398 Ministry Practicum 3

CHRM 402 Discipleship of Small Groups 3

CHRM 430 Local Church Outreach 3

CHRM 460 Church Administration 3

Choice of one of the following two courses: 3

CHRM 305 Teaching the Bible

CHRM 340 Sermon Preparation and Preaching

Choice of one of the following: 3

CHRM 310 Youth Culture and Faith Development

CHRM 351 Team Ministry

MISS 350 Missions and Culture

MISS 404 Church Growth and Planting

____

Concentration Total 27

Cognate

BIB 306 Hermeneutics 3

BIB Old Testament elective 3

BIB New Testament elective 3

THE 217 Research Seminar 3

THE 299 Introduction to Theology 3

Choice of one of the following courses: 3

THE 303 Major World Religions

THE 415 Christian Apologetics

____

Cognate Total 18

Minor and/or Electives* 18

____

Degree Total 128

*One to two hours of electives may be met by a directed study or by one of the five credit hours from the 102 level of the foreign language requirement.

Local Church Pastor Concentration (LCPC)

The local church pastor concentration is designed to educate and equip students to prepare God’s people for righteous living and works of service so that the body of Christ is built and flourishes. Students receive broad knowledge and a diversity of skills in pastoral care, preaching, teaching the Bible, evangelism, mission work, and discipleship to develop pastoral attitudes and abilities that help them train, supervise, lead, and nurture a local congregation of believers. It emphasizes a strong Biblical/theological foundation and provides well-balanced training in the theory and practice of pastoral ministry.

Concentration

CHRM 302 Christian Leadership 3

CHRM 315 Charismatic/Pentecostal Approaches to Pastoral Caregiving 3

CHRM 340 Sermon Preparation and Preaching 3

CHRM 351 Team Ministry 3

CHRM 398 Ministry Practicum 3

CHRM 460 Church Administration 3

MISS 404 Church Growth and Planting 3

THE 461 History of Christianity I: Early Church 3

Choice of one of the following courses: 3

CHRM 307 Urban Outreach Ministries

MISS 325 Introduction to Missions

____

Concentration Total 27

Cognate

BIB 306 Hermeneutics 3

BIB Old Testament elective 3

BIB New Testament elective 3

THE 217 Research Seminar 3

THE 299 Introduction to Theology 3

Choice of one of the following courses: 3

THE 303 Major Religions of the World

THE 415 Christian Apologetics

____

Cognate Total 18

Minor and/or Electives* 18

____

Degree Total 128

*One to two hours of electives may be met by a directed study or by one of the five credit hours from the 102 level of the foreign language requirement.

Missions Concentration (MISC)

The missions concentration is designed to educate and prepare students to fulfill Jesus’ commission to reach all nations with the witness of God’s saving love. It is designed for students preparing for all types of service as domestic or foreign missionaries or tent-makers in both long-term and short-term cross-cultural ministry. It is also arranged to educate students for duties as church mission directors or supervisors. It emphasizes a strong Biblical/theological foundation and provides well-balanced training in the theory and practice of missions.

Concentration

MISS 300 History of Missions 3

MISS 325 Introduction to Christian Missions 3

MISS 333 Theology of Missions 3

MISS 350 Missions and Culture 3

MISS 396 Internship Preparation 1

MISS 397 Missions Internship 2

MISS 404 Church Growth and Planting 3

CHRM/MISS Electives 6

Choice of one of the following two courses: 3

CHRM 305 Teaching the Bible

CHRM 340 Sermon Preparation and Preaching

____

Concentration Total 27

Cognate

BIB 306 Hermeneutics 3

BIB Old Testament elective 3

BIB New Testament elective 3

THE 217 Research Seminar 3

THE 299 Introduction to Theology 3

THE 303 Major Religions of the World 3

____

Cognate Total 18

Minor and/or Electives* 18

____

Degree Total 128

*One to two hours of electives may be met by a directed study or by one of the five credit hours from the 102 level of the foreign language requirement.

Youth and Family Ministries Concentration (YMNC)

The youth ministry concentration is designed to educate and equip students to be youth ministers in the local church. They gain an understanding of the foundations for ministry, roles and relationship of the youth minister, and administrative principles and strategies. Students receive broad knowledge and a diversity of skills in pastoral care, preaching, teaching the Bible, evangelism, mission work, and discipleship. It emphasizes a strong Biblical/theological foundation and provides well-balanced training in the theory and practice of youth ministry.

Concentration

CHRM 310 Youth Culture and Faith Development 3

CHRM 317 Introduction to Youth Ministry 3

CHRM 351 Team Ministry 3

CHRM 398 Ministry Practicum 3

CHRM 431 Media and Technology in Ministry 3

CHRM 453 Pastoral Care of Families with Youth 3

CHRM 460 Church Administration 3

Choice of one of the following: 3

CHRM 305 Teaching the Bible

CHRM 340 Sermon Preparation and Preaching

Choice of one of the following: 3

CHRM 302 Christian Leadership

CHRM 307 Urban Outreach Ministries

CHRM 402 Discipleship of Small Groups

CHRM 456 Children’s Ministry

____

Concentration Total 27

Cognate

BIB 306 Hermeneutics 3

BIB Old Testament elective 3

BIB New Testament elective 3

THE 217 Research Seminar 3

THE 299 Introduction to Theology 3

Choice of one of the following courses: 3

THE 303 Major Religions of the World

THE 304 Contemporary Religions in America

THE 415 Christian Apologetics

____

Cognate Total 18

Minor and/or Electives* 18

____

Degree Total 128

*One to two hours of electives may be met by a directed study or by one of the five credit hours from the 102 level of the foreign language requirement.

  

historical and philosophical theology Major (HPTH) Bachelor of Arts

The Historical and Philosophical Theology Major enables the student to integrate the various doctrines of the Christian faith into a consistent whole, providing the foundation for pursuing a ministerial or academic calling. 

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Bible (BIB 222, 261) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science (two lectures and two labs) 8

Mathematics 3

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315)

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, FIN 244, SOC 101, SOC 201, BUS 201, SOC 323, SWK 202, MUS 208)

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 62

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

Major
CORE

BIB 306 Hermeneutics 3

BIB Elective (Old Testament or New Testament) 3

THE 217 Seminar in Theological Research 3

THE 396 Intercultural Experience 1

THE 397 Research Practicum 2

THE 499 Senior Paper 3

historical and philosophical emphasis

THE 299 Introduction to Theology 3

THE 303 Major Religions of the World 3

THE 313 Systematic Theology I 3

THE 353 History of Christianity in America 3

THE 415 Christian Apologetics 3

THE 461 History of Christianity I: The Early Church 3

THE 464 Prayer 3

PHIL 302 Introduction to Philosophy 3

PHIL 401 Ethics 3

PHIL 470 Philosophy of Religion 3

PHIL 473 Philosophy/Theology in Modern Culture 3

____

Major Total 48

Minor or Electives Total 18

____

Degree Total 128

  

English Bible Minor (EBM)

This minor is designed for students who are not Biblical literature majors.

BIB 306* Hermeneutics 3

BIB Electives** 15

____

Minor Total 18

*If BIB 306 is taken as part of the student’s major, then it must be replaced by an Old or New Testament elective for the minor.

**Electives need to be divided equally between the Old and New Testaments.

Note: If a student takes Biblical Greek or Hebrew to fulfill the BIB electives, both semesters of elementary Greek or Hebrew must be taken in order to count toward the minor.

Old Testament Minor (OTM)

This minor is designed for students who are not Biblical literature majors. However, students pursuing a major within the Undergraduate Theology Department and wanting to minor in Old Testament need to have their programs approved by the department. Requirements for the Old Testament minor vary according to the major; however, the following courses must be included in either the major or in the Old Testament minor.

BIB 306* Hermeneutics 3

BIB 311 Biblical Hebrew I 3

BIB 312 Biblical Hebrew II 3

BIB 319 Hebrew Exegesis 3

BIB Electives in Old Testament 6

____

Minor Total 18

*If BIB 306 is taken as part of the student’s major, then it must be replaced by an Old Testament elective for the minor.

New Testament Minor (NTM)

This minor is designed for students who are not Biblical literature majors. However, students pursuing a major within the Undergraduate Theology Department and wanting to minor in New Testament need to have their programs approved by the department. Requirements for the New Testament minor vary according to the major; however, the following courses must be included in either the major or in the New Testament minor.

BIB 251 Biblical Greek I 3

BIB 252 Biblical Greek II 3

BIB 306* Hermeneutics 3

BIB 351 Greek Exegesis I 3

BIB Electives in New Testament 6

____

Minor Total 18

If BIB 306 is taken as part of the student’s major, then it must be replaced by an New Testament elective for the minor.

Biblical Languages Minor (BLAM)

BIB 251 Biblical Greek I 3

BIB 252 Biblical Greek II 3

BIB 311 Biblical Hebrew I 3

BIB 312 Biblical Hebrew II 3

BIB 319 Hebrew Exegesis 3

BIB 351 Greek Exegesis I 3

____

Minor Total 18

Preseminary Minor (PSM)

Requirements for the preseminary minor vary according to the major; however, the following courses must be included in the student’s program, either in the major or preseminary minor.

BIB 222 Old Testament Introduction* 3

BIB 261 New Testament Introduction* 3

BIB 306 Hermeneutics* 3

Choice of one of the following two courses: 3

BIB 251 Biblical Greek I

BIB 311 Biblical Hebrew I

Choice of one of the following two courses: 3

BIB 252 Biblical Greek II

BIB 312 Biblical Hebrew II

Choice of one of the following two courses: 3

THE 313 Systematic Theology I

THE 461 History of Christianity I: Early Church

____

Minor Total 18

*Students who have majors in the Undergraduate Theology Department that require these courses need to substitue appropriate upper division BIB courses after consulting with their advisors.

jewish Studies Minor (JSM)

BIB 303 Jewish Civilization 3

BIB 306 Hermeneutics* 3

BIB 349 Israel in Christian Theology 3

BIB 438 Intertestamental Literature 3

BIB 453 Jewish Perspectives on the Bible 3

BIB 483 The Jewish & Rabbinic Background 3 to the Gospels

____

Minor Total 18

*If BIB 306 is taken as part of the student’s major, then it must be replaced by an Old Testament or Jewish elective for the minor.

Church Administration Minor (CHAM)

CHRM 302 Chrisitan Leadership 3

CHRM 460 Church Administration 3

MGT 130 Principles of Management 3

MGT 465 Administrations of Nonprofit 3 Organizations

Choice of two of the following: 6

COM 300 Organizational Communication

CHRM 307 Urban and Outreach Ministries

MGT 352 Organizational Behavior

MISS 404 Church Growth and Planting

____

Minor Total 18

 

Evangelism and Outreach Minor (EVOM)

CHRM 335 Introduction to Evangelism 3

CHRM 430 Local Church Outreach 3

Choice of one of the following courses: 3

CHRM 305 Teaching the Bible

CHRM 340 Sermon Preparation/Preaching

Choice of three of the following courses: 9

BIB 306 Hermeneutics*

CHRM 307 Urban Outreach Ministries

CHRM 317 Introduction to Youth Ministry

CHRM 402 Discipleship and Small Groups

CHRM 431 Media and Technology in Ministry

MISS 404 Church Growth and Planting

THE 415 Christian Apologetics

____

Minor Total 18

*BIB 306 must be taken unless it is required in the student’s major.

Missions Minor (MM)

MISS 300 History of Missions 3

MISS 325 Introduction to Christian Missions 3

MISS 350 Missions and Culture 3

THE 303 Major Religions of the World 3

Choice of two of the following courses: 6

BIB 306 Hermeneutics*

CHRM 307 Urban and Outreach Ministries

CHRM 402 Discipleship and Small Groups

MISS 333 Theology of Missions

MISS 397 Missions Internship

MISS 404 Church Growth and Planting

____

Minor Total 18

*BIB 306 must be taken unless it is required in the student’s major.

Youth and Family Ministries Minor (YMM)

CHRM 305 Teaching the Bible 3

CHRM 310 Youth Culture 3

CHRM 317 Introduction to Youth Ministry 3

CHRM 453 Pastoral Care of Families with 3 Youth

Choice of two of the following courses: 6

BIB 306 Hermenutics*

CHRM 307 Urban Outreach Ministries

CHRM 335 Introduction to Evangelism

CHRM 351 Team Ministry

CHRM 402 Discipleship and Small Groups

CHRM 431 Media and Technology in Ministry

MISS 325 Introduction to Christian Missions

____

Minor Total 18

*BIB 306 must be taken unless it is required in the student’s major.

Christian Caregiving Minor (CCM)

PSY 201 Principles of Psychology 3

CCC 301 Intro to Christian Caregiving 3

CCC 324 Found of Personality Development 3

CCC 332 Lifespan Development 3

CCC 339 Developing Helping Skills 3

Choice of one of the following: 3

CCC 303 Issues and Identity of the Caregiver

CCC 321 Christian Approaches to Counseling

CCC 405 Crisis Intervention

CCC 426 Assessment and Evaluation

CCC 429 Substance Abuse

PSY 338 Psychology of Abnormal Behavior

____

Minor Total 18

Church History/Systematic Theology Minor (CHSM)

THE 313 Systematic Theology I 3

THE 314 Systematic Theology II 3

THE 461 Hist of Christianity I: Early Church 3

THE 462 Hist of Christianity II: 3           Medieval Church

THE 463 History of Christianity III: 3 Reformation to the Present

THE Elective 3

_____

Minor Total 18

Christian Apologetics Minor (APOM)

PHIL 302 Introduction to Philosophy 3

THE 299 Introduction to Theology 3

THE 415 Christian Apologetics 3

Choice of three of the following courses: 9

PHIL 299 Philosophy of Science

PHIL 470 Philosophy of Religion

PHIL 473 Theology and Philosophy in Modern Culture

THE 303 Major Religions of the World

THE 444 Contemporary Theology

____

Minor Total 18

     

  

Departmental Courses

Descriptions of the courses listed below are in the section titled Course Descriptions at the end of this catalog. Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order by the prefix. Courses offered are listed as “F” for the “fall,” “S” for the “spring,” and courses with no designation have variable schedules. The department has more information.
Biblical Studies

BIB 222 Old Testament Introduction F

BIB 251 Biblical Greek I F

BIB 252 Biblical Greek II S

BIB 261 New Testament Introduction S

BIB 302 Historical Geography of the Holy Land S, odd

BIB 303 Jewish Civilization S

BIB 306 Hermeneutics: Principles of Biblical Interpretation F,S

BIB 311 Biblical Hebrew I F

BIB 312 Biblical Hebrew II S

BIB 313 Jewish History and Culture of New Testament Times F

BIB 319 Hebrew Exegesis F

BIB 332 Old Testament Historical Books S, even

BIB 346 Luke-Acts S

BIB 349 Israel in Christian Theology F, even

BIB 351 Greek Exegesis I F

BIB 352 Greek Exegesis II S

BIB 358 Turkey Study Tour F, even

BIB 362 Jesus and the Gospels F

BIB 363 Eschatology and the Book of Revelation Sum

BIB 364 The Pauline Epistles F

BIB 372 Johannine Literature F

BIB 376 Hebrews and General Epistles S

BIB 401 Israel Study Trip Sum, even

BIB 421 Pentateuch F

BIB 424 Hebrew Prophets S

BIB 437 Psalms and Wisdom Literature S

BIB 438 Intertestamental Literature S, odd

BIB 453 Jewish Perspectives on the Bible S

BIB 455 Intensive Studies

BIB 457 Honors Assistant Practicum F, S

BIB 483 Jewish and Rabbinic Background to F the Gospels

BIB 499 Senior Paper F, S

BIB 999 Elective

Biblical Literature

BLIT 110 Survey of Old Testament Literature F

BLIT 120 Survey of New Testament Literature S

BLIT 999 Elective

 

Christian Caregiving and Counseling

CCC 301 Intro to Christian Caregiving F

CCC 303 Issues/Identity of the Caregiver F

CCC 321 Pastoral Approaches to Counseling S

CCC 324 Foundations of Personality Develop S

CCC 332 Lifespan Development F

CCC 339 Developing Helping Skills F

CCC 411 Practical Application of Helping Skills S

CCC 426 Assessment/Evaluation

CCC 429 Substance Abuse S

CCC 499 Senior Practicum/Project F, S

 

Church Ministries

CHRM 302 Christian Leadership S

CHRM 305 Teaching the Bible F, S

CHRM 307 Urban Outreach Ministries F

CHRM 310 Youth Culture and Faith Development S

CHRM 315 Charismatic/Pentecostal Approaches to Pastoral Caregiving

CHRM 317 Introduction to Youth Ministry F

CHRM 335 Introduction to Evangelism F

CHRM 340 Sermon Preparation and Preaching F

CHRM 351 Team Ministry S

CHRM 395 Intercultural Field Experience

CHRM 398 Ministry Practicum F, S, Sum

CHRM 402 Discipleship and Small Groups S

CHRM 430 Local Church Outreach S

CHRM 431 Media and Technology in Ministry S

CHRM 453 Pastoral Care of Families with Youth F

CHRM 455 Intensive Studies

CHRM 456 Children’s Ministry F, odd

CHRM 457 Honors Assistant Practicum

CHRM 460 Church Administration F, even

CHRM 499 Senior Paper/Portfolio F, S

CHRM 999 Elective

Global Ministry and the Marketplace

GMMP 499 Senior Paper S

 
Missions

MISS 300 History of Missions S

MISS 325 Introduction to Christian Missions F

MISS 333 Theology of Missions S

MISS 350 Missions and Culture F

MISS 396 Internship Preparation F

MISS 397 Missions Internship S, Sum

MISS 401 Ministry and Business F

MISS 404 Church Growth and Planting F

MISS 455 Intensive Studies

MISS 499 Senior Paper

MISS 999 Elective

 

Philosophy

PHIL 299 Philosophy of Science

PHIL 302 Introduction to Philosophy F, S

PHIL 400 Research Practicum

PHIL 401 Ethics F

PHIL 470 Philosophy of Religion S, even

PHIL 473 Theology/Philosophy in Modern Culture F

PHIL 499 Senior Paper

 

Theological-Historical

THE 103 Spirit-Empowered Living F

THE 217 Seminar in Theological Research F, S

THE 299 Introduction to Theology F, S

THE 303 Major Religions of the World S

THE 304 Contemporary Religions in Amer S

THE 313 Systematic Theology I F

THE 314 Systematic Theology II S

THE 349 Israel in Christian Theology 3, F, even

THE 353 History of Christianity in America F, even

THE 403 Global Christianity F

THE 415 Christian Apologetics S

THE 444 Contemporary Theology S, odd

THE 445 Charismatic Theology F, odd

THE 455 Intensive Studies

THE 457 Honors Assistant Practicum F, S

THE 461 History of Christianity I: Early Church F

THE 462 History of Christianity II: S, odd Medieval Church

THE 463 History of Christianity III: S, even Reformation to Present

THE 499 Senior Paper F, S

THE 999 Elective

  

Graduate School of Theology and Ministry--Seminary

MISSION STATEMENT:

The Graduate School of Theology and Ministry, the Seminary of Oral Roberts University, educates and equips men and women biblically, theologically, and professionally to serve as Spirit-empowered leaders in the church, society, and the global community.

 

Overview

ORU Graduate School of Theology and Ministry (Seminary) provides sound academic, theological, and Biblical education with a distinctive charismatic dimension. Students are trained to be academically competent and to place that competency at the disposal of the Holy Spirit as a tool for ministry, in order to bring revival, transformation, and healing. To equip students fully, the Seminary requires training in prayer, divine healing, and signs and wonders, while providing a challenging academic foundation. In the classroom, professors provide Biblical understanding, theological insight, and ministry preparedness in an atmosphere of caring accountability.

 

Accreditation

The Graduate School of Theology and Ministry is accredited by the Commission on Accredition of the Association of Theological Schools in the United states and Canada (ATS). The following degree programs are approved:

  • Master of Divinity
  • M.A. in Biblical Literature
  • M.A. in Theological/Historical Studies
  • M.A. in Christian Counseling
  • M.A. in Missions
  • M.A. in Practical Theology
  • Doctor of Ministry

 

Commission Contact Information is as follows:

The Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada

10 Summit Park Drive

Pittsburg, PA 15275

Telephone: 412-788-6505

Fax: 412-788-6510

Website: www.ats.edu

 

Statement of educational effectiveness

The Graduate School of Theology and Ministry measures its educational effectiveness through a comprehensive student learning assessment program, which determines student competencies in relationship to degree program goals.

 

Statement of Purpose

ORU Graduate School of Theology and Ministry (Seminary) seeks to prepare students for competent and Spirit-led Christian ministry. The Seminary is called to develop men and women who know the Bible, who have a deep compassion for people, and who, through the empowerment of the Holy Spirit, can revitalize the church, evangelize the world, and heal the nations.

Professional, theological education at this Seminary integrates Biblical and theological training with practical skills. This integration takes place in a charismatic/Pentecostal ethos where the gifts of the Spirit are manifested and spiritual formation is nurtured.

The Seminary seeks to develop leaders who can communicate the message of the Gospel to those in need of a Savior and God’s healing power to the world’s suffering.

As a multi-denominational Seminary, the ORU Graduate School of Theology and Ministry seeks to prepare students for Christian ministry within a broad spectrum of traditions, churches, and cultures. Although intentionally evangelical, it is important to embrace a diversity of theological understandings. This enables students to effectively relate to their unique sphere of influence. ORU Graduate School of Theology and Ministry’s philosophy seeks to introduce students to the ongoing ecumenical dialogue concerning the nature of the Church and to broaden students’ awareness of the larger Body of Christ.

ORU Graduate School of Theology and Ministry exists to prepare men and women for ministry who know the Bible, who have a deep compassion for people, and who, through personal charismatic experiences, can interpret Biblical truth to the Church and society in light of the present-day movement of the Holy Spirit. In other words, it is important to teach, to inform, and to place knowledge as a tool for ministry at the disposal of the Holy Spirit for relevant application.

Importantly, the ORU Graduate School of Theology and Ministry trains Christian leaders to carry God’s healing power and seed-faith lifestyle to the world’s suffering and lost, whether in America’s darkened ghettoes and affluent suburbs or in developing countries.

The goal of the seminary for its graduates is to carry this vital message of redemption, holiness, and healing to those places “where God’s light is dim, where His voice is heard small, where His healing power is not known.”

Why a Graduate School of Theology and Ministry at Oral Roberts University?

The ORU Graduate School of Theology and Ministry at Oral Roberts University is firmly grounded in a concept of abundant life and a charismatic concern for the healing of the totality of human need.

The comprehensive, integrated curriculum is designed to balance Bible knowledge and practical, professional ministry skills that will lead to more effective evangelism and healing for body, mind, and spirit. Students are challenged to seek wholeness in their personal lives so they can help those whom they contact to develop wholeness as a way of life.

The following statement by Chancellor Oral Roberts answers “Why a School of Theology and Ministry at Oral Roberts University?” and explains his vision for those who graduate from the master of arts, the master of divinity, and the doctor of ministry programs.

“Two things are essential to a vibrant, fruitful ministry of the Gospel. One, Christian leaders must know the Bible; they must really know the life of Jesus and what the Bible says. And second, Christian leaders must have a deep compassion for people.

“As I travel this great country of ours and receive mail from around the world, I feel these voids in Christian leadership. I see a deep hunger in people to know God better. People are searching for someone to explain to them how to live abundantly. They are also aching for love. They long for someone to touch them, to care, to share their deep concerns, and to help them find answers to their needs. These are the very reasons we have a Graduate School of Theology and Missions at ORU to train students to know the Bible and to care for people.

“ORU has a baccalaureate theology program, two masters programs, and a doctoral program. The master of arts program offers specializations in several different areas of ministry. The academic specializations immerse students in the Word and its teachings and enable students to train others. The professional specializations equip students for ministry in Christian counseling, Christian education, practical theology or missions.

“The master of divinity program is the basic professional program for ministry and is especially designed for persons who plan to become pastors, evangelists, youth workers, chaplains, missionaries, or enter other areas of Christian leadership. These graduate students receive a solid grounding in the Bible. They also receive practical and professional training in how to be effective church leaders, how to administer church programs, how to preach, how to counsel, and how to lead evangelism programs. Throughout their three years of study, master of divinity students are involved in special projects that place them in the church and community. They become involved with people in need from various backgrounds: the elderly, juvenile delinquents, the poor, the disabled, the imprisoned, and the ghetto children. They give their time and talents; they go into areas where people hurt and touch them with their love.

“The doctor of ministry program enables persons already in full-time ministry to deepen their knowledge of the Word and update their skills while learning from both professors and peers. These ministerial leaders are involved daily in sharing the Word and meeting the needs of others.

“As the students of these graduate programs open their lives to God and give to other people, I believe a miracle will take place. I believe the Holy Spirit will become as real to them as the air they breathe. They will find themselves instruments in God’s hands. A strong, invisible triangle will be formed between God, the ORU student, and the person in need—a relationship that can last for all eternity.

“Let me tell you what I expect from our graduate theology students. I expect our students to be open to the working of the Holy Spirit in their lives and in the lives of others. Through the Holy Spirit, they will find new strength and authority to minister.

“I expect excellence from our students. We have a motto at ORU that says “excellence is a way of life.” We believe in giving God our best and then expecting His best for our lives. Our students have the finest professors and facilities, and we expect our students to devote their finest efforts to their studies.

“I expect their witness to extend to all aspects of life. When Jesus healed people, He often used these words: “Be made whole.” To Christ, wholeness was more than spiritual cleansing. Wholeness meant harmony of spirit, mind, and body. It meant a unity in the inner man and vibrant living in all areas of life.

“At ORU we attempt to integrate the entire person. We call it the whole-man concept. This concept formed the basis for the founding of ORU, and our purpose is to train men and women whose lives reflect this. Our theology students work at physical fitness and mental growth in the same way they work to develop their spiritual potential. I expect our students to go into every facet of life and to share Christ wherever His light is dim, wherever His voice is heard small. I expect them to go to all the nations and to minister to people of all races.

“Full-time graduate and professional students attend chapel together, study together in the same library, and share some classes. This common exposure helps them become better acquainted with a variety of professional perspectives and gives them a new appreciation for the problems people face in our world. I expect our theology students to provide leadership and love to all who may be weak and unloved.

“The ORU School of Theology and Missions opened in 1975, enriched by ORU’s fine baccalaureate theological program, which is one of the largest and strongest departments on campus. The Seminary is housed in the Marajen Chinigo Graduate Center, which is a 448,000-square-foot addition to the John D. Messick Learning Resources Center. I believe it is the finest building of its kind.

“We live in a state of expectancy at ORU. We believe in miracles. We work diligently. We are proud to be a free enterprise people. We have faith in God and a spirit of unity. ORU is a family—a family of students, faculty, staff members, and partners around the world. We are unashamedly Christian. We believe in the mighty power of the Holy Spirit. We live to minister.

“Why a graduate School of Theology and Missions? Because God wants people to be whole, and we want what God wants—healing for the totality of human need.”

--Oral Roberts 

 

Spiritual Formation

In the distinctive charismatic ethos of the ORU Graduate School of Theology and Ministry, spiritual formation is of primary importance. Spiritual formation occurs both intentionally and informally. The Director of Assessment and the Assessment Committee provide guidance in developing a program to facilitate spiritual formation.

A primary force for intentional spiritual formation is the strong advisement program that assigns students to individual faculty members for their educational journeys. Students meet individually with their advisors throughout the academic year. Faculty members are available for advisement and prayer.

Students are involved in Koinonia groups during their first semester of enrollment. These small groups of students meet weekly with professors for sharing and prayer. The sessions focus on relationship with God, a personal call to ministry, and other related components of spiritual formation.

University chapels, which are conducted twice weekly, particularly provide the charismatic emphasis and spiritual dynamic that is at the heart of Oral Roberts University. Special meetings are conducted during the semester to address the particular needs of seminarians. Other opportunities for spiritual formation are included in the field education program, missions trips, weekly communion services, and student-led ministry opportunities. 

Degree Programs

Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.)

The doctor of ministry degree provides advanced professional training for practical ministry. The program is designed for professionals with an earned master of divinity degree in full-time ministry. It develops ministerial skills and enables ministers to grow in understanding and interpretation of the Church’s ministry.

Master of Divinity (M.Div.)

The master of divinity degree is the basic professional degree for ordained ministry. It prepares people to be effective as pastors, evangelists, chaplains, missionaries, and ministers. A concentration in pastoral care and chaplaincy is offered in this major.

Master of Arts (M.A.)

The master of arts degree offers both academic and professional programs. These programs prepare students for specialized ministries within the local church, educational institutions, and parachurch or community organizations. The master of arts degree is well suited as foundational study for Ph.D./Ed.D. degree programs.

Academic M.A. Programs
  • Biblical Literature

Concentrations are also offered in Advanced Languages and Judaic-Christian Studies

  • Theological and Historical Studies
Professional M.A. Programs
  • Christian Counseling - This program leads to licensure as a professional conselor. 

A concentration is available in Marital and Family Therapy that leads to licensure as a Marital and Family Therapist.

  • Missions
  • Practical Theology

Concentrations are also offered in Teaching Ministries and Urban Ministry

 

Joint Degree Program

A joint degree program allows students to gain an area of expertise for future ministry. Students may enroll in two masters degrees simultaneously. With proper planning and advisement, they may fulfill the requirements for both degrees with significantly less time than it would take otherwise.

Some graduate programs, however, cannot be combined in the joint degree program. The Master of Divinity and M.A. in Practical Theology degree plans, including their concentrations, may not be used together as a joint degree. Likewise, the M.A. in Christian Counseling (Licensed Professional Counselor, CCL/LPCC) and the Christian Counseling with the marital and family concentration (CCL/MFTC) may not be combined under the joint degree program, although additional courses can be added to the degree if the student desires to qualify for both state licenses.

 

Modular and ONLINE Education Option

In today’s highly mobile and fast-paced society, it can be difficult to earn a residence degree at the graduate level. This is especially true for potential students who are already in full or part-time employment and who live far from campus. Thus, fully accredited modular Master of Divinity (M. Div.) and Master of Arts in Practical Theology (MPT) programs are especially designed for individuals who desire to continue their education but cannot relocate to Tulsa.

The M.Div. modular degree is 80.5 credit hours, and the MPT degree is 47.5 credit hours. Courses for both degrees are offered through a combination of fully online courses and blended courses, which allow students to attend class on campus for all or half of a five-day intensive week while completing the other half of the coursework online.

These modular sessions on campus are held Monday-Friday from 8:30 to 5:30 p.m. daily, during the middle of each semester. The on-campus courses are offered on a two-year rotation. Students who are not able to take a particular course in a particular semester have an opportunity to take that course again within two years.

Students in the modular program set their own pace but are encouraged to enroll in as many courses (both on-campus and online) as they can realistically incorporate into their schedules each semester.

 

Admission Information

Admission Requirements

Admission requirements for the master’s degree programs vary to some extent; however, applicants to any of the master’s programs need to submit the following items to the Admissions Committee for review and consideration:

Proof of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university or college recognized by the Association of Biblical Higher Education.

  • Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate studies attended
  • Score from Miller Analogies Test (MAT) of at least 396 or from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) of at least 300. Scores must be from within the past 5 years.
  • Score from the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) of at least 7.0 or from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). TOEFL scores must be at least 550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based), or 78-80 (Internet-based). (For non-native English speakers only)
  • Proof of acceptable grade point average (3.0 for all degree programs)
  • Two academic recommendations
  • A ministerial recommendation
  • A personal sketch

The Admissions Committee may require applicants to submit additional information for evaluation. Applicants to the M.Div. degree may need to submit a personal interview, psychological test results, a spouse's endorsement, and/or a statement of status at another educational institution. A professional recommendation may be requested if the student has been out of school more than five years.

The Admissions Committee may also require applicants to take prerequisite/leveling courses. (Prerequisite/leveling courses are courses at the undergraduate level that help prepare students for courses in the graduate degrees.) Applicants to the master of arts professional degree programs (Christian counseling, missions, practical theology) may also need to provide a personal interview, psychological test results, a spouse's endorsement, or a statement of status at another educational institution.

As the ORU Graduate School of Theology and Ministry is a theological seminary preparing students for multiple ministries and positions of authority, in addition to the academic qualifications of the applicant, the Admissions Committee will also consider the applicant’s sense of calling to the ministry (based on biographical essay) and related information provided in the references.

 

Changing Programs

Students are admitted to the Seminary by acceptance into a particular degree program and concentration and must pursue studies in that program. Students may change programs only if formally accepted into another program. Acceptance into one program does not guarantee admission into another.

When the program change becomes effective, the student is subject to the requirements of the current catalog at the time of matriculation into the new program.

 

Readmission Requirements

Students who have not maintained continuous enrollment and who desire to continue their studies must apply for readmission through the Seminary Admissions Office. Students readmitted to the Seminary are subject to the requirements of the current catalog at the time of readmission. The Admissions Committee may request additional information. If students have attended other institutions, they must supply official transcripts.

 

Enrollment and Retention

Students enrolled in the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry are expected to maintain a 3.00  appropriate grade point average for the program in which they are enrolled.  Students failing to achieve the minimum grade point average in their programs during any semester are automatically placed on probation. In the doctoral program no course grade less than a “B” is accepted. Two “C” course grades result in suspension from the doctoral program.

Students entering the Seminary on probation must achieve removal from probation status within one academic year of matriculation. If a student is placed on probation in the course of the degree, one academic year is allowed to restore the GPA to the appropriate level. Normally, 12 semester hours of coursework earned in one semester with the appropriate grade point average is sufficient to remove one from probation. Students do not receive financial aid in the form of institutional funds during any semester on probation.

Students who fail to achieve a sufficient grade point average while they are on probation within the specified time are suspended from the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry.

 

Course Information

 

Numbering and Sequence

Courses offered in all areas of the Seminary curriculum are appropriate for graduate level students in the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry. In general, 500- and 600-level courses are designed for the masters degrees, and 700-level courses are for the doctoral degree. The 500-level courses are frequently considered necessary before students can enroll in advanced-level courses represented by the 600 and 700 numbers.

Students may also be required to take prerequisite/leveling courses in addition to courses required for the graduate degree. Prerequisite/leveling courses need to be taken during the student’s first semester as a graduate student, and the hours earned from leveling courses are in addition to the hours required for the graduate degree.

 

Course Load

The full-time course load for master’s-level students in the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry is 9 hours.

The full-time load for doctoral students in the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry is 6 hours per semester while enrolled in the coursework phase of the program. One hour per semester is considered full-time when enrolled in the project phase.

 

Courses by Special Arrangement

With the permission of the faculty advisor, the associate dean, and the instructor of a particular course listed in the catalog, students in special circumstances may complete that course by special arrangement. The objectives of the course, as defined in the current syllabus on file in the office of the dean, must be met. Special assignments, tests, and conferences may be required to satisfy the instructor and coordinator of the area concerned that the objectives have been achieved. A course of study that involves extensive work while the student is absent from the campus may be pursued only upon the approval of a petition presented to the associate dean.

 

Credit by Examination, Transfer of Credit and Advanced Standing

Students entering the Seminary with advanced knowledge in a particular area of the curriculum may receive credit for courses to which the advanced knowledge relates by passing a comprehensive examination with a score of 80% or above. Such examinations must be taken during the first semester of residency.

The Graduate School of Theology and Ministry follows the Association of Theological Schools (ATS) guidelines regarding credit transfer and advanced standing.

  • ATS requires that the transfer courses be graduate level courses from an institution accredited by ATS or a recognized accrediting body.
  • ATS allows seminaries and graduate schools to admit students with advanced standing with credit by reducing the number of hours required for the degree. The courses selected for advanced standing must be comparable to the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry graduate courses, and the amount of credit is limited.
  • Students with ORU undergraduate majors in Old or New Testament or in Theological and Historical Studies and who are eligible to apply for the M.A. academic track could receive up to 15 hours of advanced standing for undergraduate courses with a “B” or better.

 

Audit Privilege

Students in the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry may—with the approval of the instructors, their faculty advisors, and the associate dean—audit, without academic credit, courses offered by the Seminary. The audit privilege allows students to attend courses for personal enrichment without fulfilling the academic requirements. Required courses in any degree program may not be audited. Regular class attendance, as outlined in the course syllabus, is required to maintain an audit on transcript. If students do not meet the audit requirements for a course, a “no pass” is recorded on the transcripts.

Students auditing a class may request the option of receiving a grade if they indicate this intention at the time of registration. Students must complete all course requirements according to the calendar of the course syllabus and submit a petition to the office of the associate dean to obtain credit for the course. The petition must be submitted and approved and tuition paid within one semester following enrollment in the course. Tuition must be paid at the time of the audit change request.

A full-time Seminary student may audit one course in the Seminary curriculum per semester at no charge. Students enrolled as part-time pay one-half tuition to audit a class.

 

ORU Distinctive Courses

The Graduate School of Theology and Ministry has established specific courses in health fitness and Holy Spirit Empowerment in Life and Ministry that seek to fulfill the university’s mission. These courses are unique to ORU and are called ORU distinctive courses. These are required as part of the Seminary programs.

 

Health Fitness

The Graduate School of Theology and Ministry’ faculty and students participate in a full range of fitness opportunities. The core of the health and physical education program is the aerobics emphasis. New students at the Seminary enroll in a one-semester, one-credit course titled Graduate Health Fitness. In this course, students are instructed on the body, its anatomy and physiology, and the role of exercise, diet, weight control, and stress management in good health. Students must submit the results of a medical evaluation. An exercise program is prescribed. Requirements are adjusted according to gender and age, and special programs are available for students who cannot meet the requirements.

Following the completion of Graduate Health Fitness, all Master’s students need to take one activity course and may elect GHPE 515 Graduate Aerobics, GHPE 525 Graduate Walk for Fitness, or another activity course. Students who completed Health Fitness I and II as ORU undergraduates need to substitute an activities course for GHPE 503, which may decrease the degree total by 0.5 credit hour.

Following the completion of Graduate Health Fitness, all Doctor of Ministry students need to take an activity course and may elect GHPE 715 Graduate Aerobics, GHPE 725 Graduate Walk for Fitness, or an activity course. Students who have successfully completed Health Fitness I and II as an undergraduate student or Graduate Health Fitness in their graduate program may substitute GHPE 715 or GHPE 725 with a one credit hour undergraduate activity course.

 

Holy Spirit Distinctive Courses

During their first semesters of residency, students enrolled in a master’s-level degree program are required to take the graduate course GTHE 510 Holy Spirit Empowerment in Life and Ministry. GTHE 510 deals with part of the basic theological beliefs and lifestyle unique to Oral Roberts University. Both of these courses include practical, contemporary demonstrations of Biblical concepts from the life of Jesus and the Book of Acts. The faculty of the ORU Graduate School of Theology and Ministry firmly believes that the power and authority entrusted to the Early Church, as described in the Book of Acts, is still available to believers today. The miraculous power of Christ is to operate “in the now.”

The theological faculty encourages all students to enroll in at least one additional course dealing with this vital area of ministry, such as GTHE 663 Charismatic Theology, GTHE 694 The Pentecostal/Charismatic Movements in Historical Perspective, GTHE 696 Divine Healing: A Theological and Historical Study, and GTHE 692 Pneumatology.

 

Theological Research Proficiency

All students entering any master’s-level degree program are expected to have a comprehensive knowledge of English grammar and composition, the ability to do theological research, and a basic theological bibliography. Students passing the Theological Research Proficiency examination during first-semester orientation with a minimum score of 70 percent fulfill the requirement. Others are required to enroll in GTHE 517 Seminar in Theological Research Methods. Passing this course constitutes satisfying this proficiency requirement, which must be satisfied before students are allowed to enroll for graduate credit beyond 24 semester hours (not including prerequisite coursework). Taking PRM 784 Counseling Research meets this requirement for students in the M.A. counseling programs.

 

Evaluation Grading

Grades are recorded as “A,” “B,” “C,” “D,” or “F.” Grade points are assigned to each grade: four grade points are allowed for each semester hour of “A”; three for “B”; two for “C”; and one for “D.” In the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry, only graduate hours for which grades of “A,” “B,” or “C” are earned count toward the completion of the degree. Grade-point averages appropriate to each program are to be maintained. Courses in which a grade of “D” or “F” is earned are reported on the transcript and are included in determining the grade point average.

The grade of “I” (incomplete) is allowed for work that is incomplete at the time grades are given. It is allowed only after the student establishes with the instructor and the associate dean, by petition, that work is incomplete for good cause. Incompletes are granted only for extenuating circumstances, normally prolonged illness that is verified by medical documentation or death in the family. Petitions for an incomplete grade must be granted before the last day of regular classes. It is the responsibility of the student to make up any incomplete work and have the professor submit a grade change to the dean. If this is not done in the subsequent semester, the incomplete is changed to an “F.”

Other marks used in grade reporting are “WP” (withdraw/passing), and “WF” (withdraw/failing), and “WM” (withdraw/military). When a course is dropped after two weeks, a “WP” is recorded if the student is passing at the time of the drop. If the student is not passing, a “WF” is recorded. Any student who withdraws from a class after the eighth week receives a “WF.” The “WF” is counted as an “F” in determining the grade point average.

 

grading

Graduate students are required to maintain a cumulative 3.00 grade-point average to remain in good standing and to graduate. A grade of "C" or better counts for degree credit. Students who fall below this level are placed on probation, and students on probation whose cumulative grade-point average remains below 3.00 for two consecutive semesters are suspect to suspension from the program. Progress evaluation is normally conducted when a student has earned  12 or more hours. In addition, any student who has earned either three grades of "C" or lower, two "Ds," or an "F" while matriculating through ORU in the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry program are subject to suspension from the program. For purposes of this suspension policy, successfully retaking (raising the grade to "C" or better) does not negate the previous grade even though it does replace the grade for GPA purposes. Petitions fo Policy Exception may be considered if there are exceptional extenuating cicumstances existing.

Students are also evaluation and required to meet appropriate standards in three specific areas beyond academics: 1) Spiritual Maturity; 2) Emotional Intelligence and 3) Social Adeptness. Students may be placed on probation leading to suspension from the program if they fail fail in one or more of these areas.

 

Assessment

Professional and personal assessment is an integral part of the total educational program of the ORU Graduate School of Theology and Ministry. Assessment draws together the varied influences, experiences, and learning of the students in situations that are intentionally evaluative and advisory. It also helps students to become familiar with degree program goals and outcomes and to understand how they contribute to the achievement of the mission statement for the Seminary.

The basic components for assessment are professional skills, specialized knowledge, and personal/spiritual development. The purpose is to determine student competencies in relationship to degree program goals. Identified program goals contribute to the overall University mission to prepare professionally competent servant-leaders who are spiritually alive, intellectually alert, physically disciplined, and socially adept.

The assessment process includes a 0.5 credit hour course during both the first and final semesters of enrollment. An advisor-advisee degree program audit occurs when one-half of the degree program is completed.

Artifacts are published, stored, and assessed on an electronic portfolio (ePortfolio) each semester of enrollment. Selected artifacts have been designated to demonstrate the extent to which program goals are being achieved. Information relative to required artifacts is included in course syllabi.

An overview of the assessment program is given to all entering students at orientation, and specific requirements are explained in special sessions each semester, and at group advisement meetings. Information on the assessment process is also available online.

 

PRFT 056 Entry-Level Assessment

All entering students enroll in PRFT 056 Entry-Level Assessment. This level includes student participation in a peer group experience called Koinonia, where they reflect on their identity and calling and complete a spiritual life inventory. At the culmination of the Koinonia group experience, students write a self-reflection paper and submit it to ePortfolio for assessment.

A structured interview with academic advisors occurs as part of the entry-level assessment. The topics considered in Koinonia and a student questionnaire are discussed in relationship to vocational plans. Advisors are assigned the first semester of matriculation according to each student’s degree program and remain the student’s advisor through graduation.

Students also enroll in PRFT 059 Whole Person Assessment, a corequisite of PRFT 056 Entry-Level Assessment, for the purpose of uploading relevant assignments (“artifacts”) to ePortfolio. (A fee is attached to establish an ePortfolio account.) Training on how to use the electronic system occurs online during the first semester.

 

PRFT 057 Mid-Program Assessment Audit

PRFT 057 Mid-Program Assessment Audit provides opportunities for students to review and discuss degree program progress with their advisors. Students enroll for PRFT 057 the semester following the completion of one-half of their course requirements or during the semester prior to enrollment in PRFT 058 Candidacy-Level Assessment —whichever occurs first. During the mid-program audit conference, students discuss with their advisors how their personal calling has become more defined and reflect on their achievement of degree program goals and the personal and professional goals identified in PRFT 056 Entry-Level Assessment.

The student provides an unofficial record of credit hours completed and an inventory of the program artifacts submitted so that student and advisor may assess progress in the seminary degree program. The student submits a file copy of the audit review form signed by the advisor.

 

PRFT 058 Candidacy-Level Assessment

During the final semester of enrollment, students enroll in PRFT 058 Candidacy-Level Assessment. The purpose of this assessment is to provide opportunities for professors, students, and community/church leaders to analyze the degree to which the degree program goals were achieved by ORU seminary students.

Specified artifacts are required to demonstrate the overall attainment of outcomes for the degree program. The student is responsible for electronically submitting appropriate artifacts each semester. Based on their degrees, candidates present an electronic portfolio of required artifacts and related materials for faculty review. The summative assessment includes a candidacy interview with advisors, degree area faculty, and/or community practitioners, and a comprehensive experience that integrates the overall expected outcomes of the degree program.

A representative faculty panel assesses the various forms of summative assessment according to respective rubrics. Students give feedback for intentional evaluation of degree programs and the overall institution through electronic surveys, deans’ forums and a graduates’ luncheon.

 

Background Check

Some clinical agencies and Christian ministries require students who participate in field experiences to undergo a criminal background check. Therefore, criminal background checks are conducted on all students the semester prior to enrollment in FED 672 Field Education Church; FED 673 Field Education Community; FED 750 Ministry Practicum; FED 755 Teaching Ministries Practicum; FED 760 Urban Ministry Practicum; GCSL 650 Professional Ethics in Counseling; PRM 673 Introduction to Pastoral Care; PRM 763 Counseling Practicum; PRM 764 Marriage and Family Practicum; and PRM 775 Missionary Internship. The results of this search are filed with the university’s office of Risk Management, and confidentiality is maintained. An unsatisfactory criminal record will prevent the student from enrolling in these classes and may affect the student’s completion of degree requirements. Background check forms, instructions regarding this procedure, and the cost for this process are available with the professors who oversee the field-based courses. It is the responsibility of each student to comply with these requirements and to pay the required fee. It is the student’s responsibility to inform the dean or associate dean of any new or pending criminal issues that may be involved. Failure to do so may result in disciplinary action or dismissal from the university.

 

Financial Aid

Students are considered for financial aid once they have been accepted into the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry. Students must submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form and have a financial need as determined by Federal Student Aid Programs. Institutional funds are awarded only to full-time students in good academic standing. Detailed information appears in the Financial Information section of the first chapter of this catalog.

 

Teaching Assistantships

Teaching assistantships are available to students primarily in the academic master of arts degree programs. Responsibilities are usually in the theological baccalaureate program of ORU. Assistantships may include working under the supervision of a faculty advisor to enrich existing course content, developing new teaching resources, leading undergraduate Bible and theology discussion groups, participating in limited classroom teaching and lectures, or preparing special projects and assignments. These positions require an average of 15 hours per week.

 

Scholarships and Grants

Awards are granted by the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry through an application process to qualifying graduate theology students pursuing a master’s degree. To qualify, students must be enrolled full-time (9 credit hours or more) in courses and maintain an ORU cumulative GPA of 2.5 or above. All awards are granted on a first-come, first-served basis and are subject to availability of funds. The deadline to apply for the awards is May 15 for the fall semester and December 1 for the spring semester. Applications for each scholarship/grant are available online at http://gradtheology.oru.edu/scholarships. Scholarships and grants are awarded on an annual basis and require a new application each academic year. More information about each scholarship/grant offered is available online.

 

Master of Divinity Program

The master of divinity degree (M.Div.) is the basic professional degree for ministry. The M.Div. is a balanced program that integrates the fields of Biblical literature, theological/historical studies, and the practices of ministry. As the foundational degree for practical ministry, this program prepares students for effective ministry as pastors, church associates, evangelists, chaplains, and a broad variety of ministries.

Many denominations and fellowships are represented in the ORU Graduate School of Theology and Ministry. Ordination courses are available for represented groups. Courses on polity, history, and doctrine are offered through resident faculty and visiting professors. Several of these courses are a part of the regular rotation of courses; others are offered upon request.

 

Objectives

The purpose of the program is to prepare Spirit-filled, Biblically based, historically informed, socially and ethically accountable, theologically responsible, and skillfully enabled ministers of Jesus Christ for mission with the Church in the world. The basic objectives of the master of divinity program are as follows:

  • To prepare candidates with a foundational knowledge of the content of Scripture within its cultural and historical context with application to selected contemporary situations.
  • To prepare students to interpret Biblical writings in the Greek and/or Hebrew languages, using critical exegetical tools and writing a hermeneutical and exegetical paper.
  • To provide a basic knowledge of the key movements and figures together with their significance in the history of Christianity.
  • To provide a basic knowledge of the contents and methods of Christian theology.
  • To enable students to develop skills and practical ministry strategies.
  • To equip candidates with the Biblical, theological, and ethical understanding necessary to analyze and discuss contemporary social issues affecting the Church and society.
  • To enable students to develop and articulate a theology and theory of ministry that is relevant to their backgrounds and callings.
  • To provide opportunities to develop necessary skills for ministry within a variety of traditions, ministry settings, and cross-cultural contexts.
  • To promote a Biblical/theological understanding of the person, work, and ministry of the Holy Spirit.
  • To enable students to articulate clearly their ministry/professional calling.
  • To enable students to demonstrate a ministerial formation that integrates a Biblical and theological content and a theology and theory of ministry with practical ministry skills.

 

Field Education

Field education enables students to integrate and employ Biblical-theological principles, practices of ministry, and charismatic empowerment in diverse contexts of supervised ministry in the church, community, and consultation/reflection groups to achieve competency in functioning as effective ministers of the Gospel.

For at least two semesters, master of divinity and master of practical theology students have opportunities for indepth interpersonal, social, and spiritual ministry at sites such as hospitals, nursing homes, service organizations, and local churches. Qualified supervisors guide students through experiences that give accountable, practical training to develop their full potential as professionals in ministry.

Professors, site supervisors, and students meet weekly in consultation/reflection groups—either online or in a residential context—to discuss students’ successes and challenges. Students receive guidance in dealing creatively with problems they may have encountered and in integrating their academic studies with practical experiences. The ministry/reflection emphasis encourages students to establish and evaluate their personal abilities as minister-theologians. A liability insurance fee is assessed for all field-based courses.

 

Grade Point Average

Before candidates for the master of divinity degree graduate, they must pass at least 80.5 semester hours of coursework, complete all prerequisites, satisfy all proficiency requirements, and have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00. Before the conclusion of the fifth semester of full-time studies, students must have completed the professional evaluation process and received a “pass” grade on the Candidacy-Level Assessment. Participation in graduation ceremonies is required of all candidates. 

Master of Divinity Degree (MDv) Master of Divinity

The master of divinity degree is a six-semester, 80.5 hour program structured around field education and the three curricula areas of the Seminary (Biblical literature, theological/historical studies and practices of ministry). Students are required to enroll in two semesters of field education after 50% of their coursework is complete. Twelve semester hours of open electives are provided to all students to bridge deficient areas or enhance areas of interest, including counseling, missions, Biblical literature, and theological/historical studies. Because ORU also has graduate programs in education and business, students may choose to use a limited number of these elective hours for cross-disciplinary training.

Two options in the MDV degree are offered:

  • Master of Divinity with indepth studies in Practices of Ministry (MDV)
  • Master of Divinity with a concentration in Pastoral Care and Chaplaincy (MDV-PCHC)

Both options share the same prerequisites, ORU distinctives, and courses in Biblical literature and theological/historical studies.

Prerequisite Course

Choice of one of the following: 0-3

GTHE 517 Seminar in Theological Research (3 hrs.)

PRFT 049 Theological Research Proficiency Exam (0 hrs.)

____

Prerequisite Total 0-3

Note: Credit hours from prerequisite course does not apply toward the graduate degree.

Biblical Literature

GBIB 500/510 Greek/Hebrew Synthesis I 3

GBIB 501/511 Greek/Hebrew Synthesis II 3

GBIB 551 Old Testament Synthesis 3

GBIB 571 New Testament Synthesis 3

GBIB Elective 3

GBIB Language/Translation Elective*  3

PRFT 052/053 Biblical Language Proficiency 0

Choice of one of the following two courses: 3

GBIB 561 Old Testament Hermeneutics and Exegesis (Hebrew)

GBIB 581 New Testament Hermeneutics and Exegesis (Greek)

____

Biblical Literature Total 21

*GBIB elective for students in the PCHC concentration

Theological/Historical Studies

GTHE 551 Systematic Theology I 3

GTHE 561 Systematic Theology II 3

GTHE 571 Church History I 3

GTHE 581 Church History II 3

GTHE 661 Introduction to Christian Ethics* 3

GTHE Electives 6

____

Theological/Historical Studies Total 21

*Students completing the concentration in Pastoral Care and Chaplaincy complete GCSL 650, Professional Ethics in Counseling. Students in the modular program may choose to complete GTHE 660, Ethics and Contemporary Issues.

ASSESSMENTS and ORU Distinctives

PRFT 056 Entry-Level Assessment 0.5

PRFT 057 Mid-Level Assessment 0

PRFT 058 Candidacy-Level Assessment 0.5

PRFT 059 Whole Person Assessment 0

GHPE 503 Graduate Health Fitness* 1

Choice of one of the following: 0.5

GHPE 515 Graduate Aerobics

GHPE 525 Graduate Walk for Fitness

HPE Activity course

GTHE 510 Holy Spirit Empowerment in Life and Ministry 3

____

Assessments and ORU Distinctives Total 5.5

*Students who completed Health Fitness I and II as ORU undergraduates need to substitute an activities course for GHPE 503, which may decrease the degree total by .5 credit hour.

PRACTICES OF MINISTRY for students pursuing indepth studies in practices of ministry

PRM 549 Foundations of Teaching Ministries 3

PRM 511 Ministering Cross-Culturally* 3

PRM 661 Introduction to Preaching 3

PRM 669 Practice Preaching** 3

PRM 673 Introduction to Pastoral Care 3

PRM Electives 6

FED 672 Field Education (Church) 1.5

FED 673 Field Education (Community) 1.5

GBIB/GCSL/GTHE/PRM Undesignated Electives*** 9

____

Practices of Ministry Total 33

____

Degree Total 80.5

*Students in the modular program may choose to complete PRM 575, Anthropology for Missions.

**Students in the modular program may choose to complete PRM 663, Text to Sermon.

***Students are limited to two GCSL courses. 

PRACTICES OF MINISTRY FOR STUDENTS PURSUING a concentration in pastoral care and chaplaincy

GCSL 624 Counseling Diverse Populations 3

GCSL 628 Crisis, Trauma & Addictions Counseling 3

GCSL 630 Counseling Methods 3

GCSL 770 Introduction to Psychopathology 3

PRM 673 Introduction to Pastoral Care 3 

Choice of one of the following two courses: 3

PRM 549 Foundations of Teaching Ministries

PRM 661 Introduction to Preaching

Choice of one of the following two courses: 3

PRM 780 Clinical Pastoral Education

FED 780 Pastoral Care and Chaplaincy Practicum

_____

Practices of Ministry Total 21

 
Pastoral Care & Chaplaincy Concentration (MDV-PCHC) 

GCSL 635 Human Growth and Development 3

GCSL 637 Contemporary Family Development 3

GCSL 675 Marriage and Family Therapy 3

Choice of one of the following two courses*: 3

          GCSL 528 Christian Approaches to Counseling

          PRM 678 Advanced Pastoral Care

____

MDV-PCHC Concentration Total 12

____

Degree Total 80.5

*Students in the modular program must take GCSL 528, Christian Approaches to Counseling.

  

Master of Arts  Programs

The ORU Graduate School of Theology and Ministry offers two master of arts programs: the Academic Program and the Professional Program.

Academic Degrees

The master of arts degree can be earned in the following academic degree programs:

  • Biblical Literature (with optional concentrations in either advanced languages or Judaic-Christian Studies)
  • Theological and Historical Studies

The purpose of the academic master of arts degree is to enable students to understand and appreciate the Biblical, historical, and theological content of the Christian faith within a charismatic context, and to assist students in interpreting and communicating the Christian faith with ecumenical breadth in a manner accountable to their particular ecclesiastical communities. The academic masters of arts degree is designed as a terminal degree for those planning to teach in churches, Bible colleges, and Christian schools or as foundational study for those desiring to pursue doctoral studies in the same or related disciplines.

ORU undergraduate theology students  who are (1) majoring in Biblical literaure with a concentration in Old or New Testament or in Historical and Philosopical Studies; (2) maintaining a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA; and (3) providing an undergraduate theology professor’s recommendation are eligible for the M.A. academic track. Students can complete the M.A. in two semesters and one summer. Students may receive up to 15 hours of advanced standing for undergraduate courses completed with a “B” or better.

Language Proficiency

Proficiency in any prerequisite language must be achieved before students are allowed to enroll for graduate credit beyond 24 semester hours (not including prerequisite coursework).

Language proficiency is demonstrated in one of two ways: achieving greater than 70% on either the language proficiency examination or the final examination of the second semester of a language course. Students need to sign up for language proficiency even though it is not for credit.

When this proficiency is satisfied, students must consult with their faculty advisors to confirm that their degree plan sheets reflect the fulfillment of these entrance requirements.

 

Thesis

Students in the academic master of arts program are required to write a thesis, which allows them to do focused research on topics of their own choosing. As a learning instrument, the master of arts thesis provides an index of the student’s ability to conduct research in a given area and to organize and present the results of the research in a systematic way. The topic must be approved by the faculty advisor, the area committee, and the associate dean. For details of procedure to be followed in writing the thesis, the student should consult the syllabus for GBIB 757 or GTHE 757.

Graduation Requirements

Before candidates for the academic master of arts degrees graduate, they must pass at least 52.5 semester hours of coursework, complete all prerequisites, satisfy all proficiency requirements, and have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00. They must have completed the professional evaluation. Participation in the graduation ceremonies is required of all candidates.

 

Biblical Literature (MBL) Master of Arts

The Master of Arts in Biblical Literature is designed to give students hermeneutical and exegetical perspectives, tools, and methods to develop a comprehensive understanding of the Old and New Testament and to interpret Biblical content responsibly and perceptively. This program enables students to integrate hermeneutical and exegetical insights into a theological/historical framework shaped by interaction with the charismatic ethos of Oral Roberts University.

Three options in the MBL degree are offered:

  • M.A. in Biblical Literature (MBL)
  • M.A. in Biblical Literature with a concentration in Advanced Languages (MBL-ALC)
  • M.A. in Biblical Literature with a concentration in Judaic-Christian Studies (MBL-JCSC)

Students acquire a working knowledge of Biblical languages (Hebrew and Greek). In order to provide students with a knowledge of the theological and historical context in which the Church operates, this program includes a Biblical, theological, and historical studies core.

Proficiency in Biblical Greek and Hebrew is an integral part of this program. Transcript credit and proficiency in both Greek and Hebrew are required for graduation. For students pursuing the literature focus or the Judaic-Christian studies, the first Biblical language is a prerequisite, but the second language is part of the degree program and counts toward fulfilling the degree requirements. For students pursuing the advanced languages concentration, proficiency in both Biblical languages is a prerequisite.

 

Biblical Literature Prerequisite Courses

Students intending to pursue the Biblical literature program are required to satisfy a minimum of 12 semester hours of Biblical literature plus six semester hours (two semesters) of elementary Biblical Greek or Hebrew. Those who have not fulfilled these prerequisite requirements in baccalaureate studies with at least a “B” grade and demonstrated current proficiency (a minimum of 80% on a written examination) may take the following prerequisite/leveling courses to prepare them for the graduate coursework. Credit hours from prerequisite courses do not apply toward the graduate degree.

GBIB 551 Old Testament Synthesis 3

GBIB 571 New Testament Synthesis 3

GBIB Bible electives (500 level) 6

Choice of one of the following two sequences of courses: 6

GBIB 500/501 Greek Synthesis I and II and PRFT 053 Greek Proficiency

GBIB 510/511 Hebrew Synthesis I and II and PRFT 052 Hebrew Proficiency

Choice of one of the following: 0-3

GTHE 517 Seminar in Theological Research

PRFT 049 Theological Research Proficiency Exam

____

Prerequisites Total 18-21

 

Biblical Literature with a concentration in Advanced Languages Prerequisite Courses

All students intending to pursue the Biblical literature program with the advanced languages concentration must demonstrate proficiency in both Biblical Greek I and II and Hebrew I and II at the time of matriculation. They may do so by transferring credit from another accredited university or by having ORU credit for Hebrew I and II and Greek I and II with grades of “C” or better. Additionally, students may be required to achieve a minimum of 70 percent on a written examination. The prerequisite/leveling courses for this concentration are as follows. Credit hours from prerequisite courses do not apply toward the graduate degree.

GBIB 500/501/581 and PRFT 053 Greek Synthesis I and II, NT Hermeneutics and Exegesis (Greek) and Greek Proficiency 9

GBIB 510/511/561 and PRFT 052 Hebrew Synthesis I and II and OT Exegesis (Hebrew) and Hebrew Proficiency 9

GBIB 551 Old Testament Synthesis 3

GBIB 571 New Testament Synthesis 3

Choice of one of the following: 0-3

GTHE 517 Seminar in Theological Research

PRFT 049 Theological Research Proficiency Exam

____

Prerequisites Total 24-27

 

Biblical Literature with a concentration in Judaic-Christian Studies Prerequisite Courses

All students intending to pursue the Biblical literature program with the Judaic-Christian Studies concentration must demonstrate proficiency in Biblical Greek or Hebrew at the time of matriculation. They may do so by transferring credit from another accredited university or by having ORU credit for Hebrew I and II and Greek I and II with grades of “C” or better. Additionally, students may be required to achieve a minimum of 70 percent on a written examination. Credit hours from prerequisite courses do not apply toward the graduate degree.

Choice of one of the following two sequences of courses: 9

GBIB 500/501/581 and PRFT 053 Greek Synthesis I and II, NT Hermeneutics and Exegesis (Greek) and Greek Proficiency

GBIB 510/511/561 and PRFT 052 Hebrew Synthesis I and II and OT Exegesis (Hebrew) and Hebrew Proficiency

GBIB 551 Old Testament Synthesis 3

GBIB 571 New Testament Synthesis 3

GBIB Bible elective (500 level) 3

Choice of one of the following: 0-3

GTHE 517 Seminar in Theological Research

PRFT 049 Theological Research Proficiency Exam

____

Prerequisites Total 18-21

 

ORU Distinctive and assessment Courses

PRFT 056 Entry-Level Assessment 0.5

PRFT 057 Mid-Level Assessment 0

PRFT 058 Candidacy-Level Assessment 0.5

PRFT 059 Whole Person Assessment 0

GHPE 503 Graduate Health Fitness* 1

GTHE 510 Holy Spirit Empowerment in Life and Ministry 2

Choice of one of the following: .5

GHPE 515 Graduate Aerobics

GHPE 525 Graduate Walk for Fitness

HPE Activity course

____

ORU Distinctives and Assessment Total 4.5

*Students who completed Health Fitness I and II as ORU undergraduates need to substitute an activities course for GHPE 503, which may decrease the degree total by .5 credit hour.

 

Theological and Historical Cognate

All students in the Master of Arts in Biblical Literature program complete the following cognate courses:

GBIB 611 Theology of the Old Testament* 3

GBIB 621 Theology of the New Testament* 3

GBIB 756 Thesis Research and Proposal 3

GBIB 757 Thesis Writing 3

GBIB Concentration 24

GTHE Electives** 12

____

Core Total 48

*Students with the Judaic-Christian Studies concentration take GTHE 611 and 621.

**Students with the Judaic-Christian Studies concentration take GTHE 681, one GTHE elective, and six hours of Bible or Judaic-Christian studies electives. Students should consult their advisors when selecting appropriate electives.

 

 

M.A. in Biblical Literature (MBL)

Choice of one of the following sequences (second Biblical language) 9 

GBIB 500/501/581 Greek Synthesis I and II, NT Hermeneutics and Exegesis (Greek) and PRFT 053 Greek Proficiency

GBIB 510/511/561 Hebrew Synthesis I and II, OT Hermeneutics (Hebrew) and PRFT 052 Hebrew Proficiency

GBIB Biblical literature electives 12

GBIB Language translation elective 3

GBIB 611 Theology of the Old Testament 3

GBIB 621 Theology of the New Testament 3

GBIB 756 Thesis Research and Proposal 3

GBIB 757 Thesis Writing 3

____

Biblical Literature Total 36

THEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL COGNATE

GTHE Electives 12

____

Theological and Historical Cognate Total 12

MBL Degree Total 52.5

 

M.A. in Biblical Literature with a concentration in advanced Languages (MBL-ALC)

GBIB 611 Theology of the Old Testament 3

GBIB 621 Theology of the New Testament 3

GBIB 756 Thesis Research and Proposal 3

GBIB 757 Thesis Writing 3

Choice of twelve hours from the following: 12

GBIB 618 Matthew (Greek)

GBIB 632 Isaiah (Hebrew)

GBIB 633 Pentateuch (Hebrew)

GBIB 635 Theophanies/Hebrew Scriptures (Hebrew)

GBIB 636 Exodus (Hebrew)

GBIB 637 Deuteronomy (Hebrew)

GBIB 682 Synoptic Gospels (Greek)

GBIB 683 Mark (Greek)

GBIB 704 Psalms (Hebrew)

GBIB 715 The Bible and Midrash (Hebrew)

GBIB 729 Colossians/Ephesians (Greek)

GBIB 744 Septuagint (Greek and Hebrew)

GBIB 747 Dead Sea Scrolls (Hebrew)

GBIB 777 Exegesis of Romans (Greek)

GBIB 787 Cross/Resurrection in the New Testament (Greek)

Choice of twelve hours from the following: 12

GBIB 663 Syriac

GBIB 712 Akkadian

GBIB 714 Ugaritic

GBIB 754 Coptic Studies

GBIB 755 Classical Egyptian

GBIB 761 Advanced Syriac

GBIB 764 Biblical Aramaic

____

MBL-ALC Concentration Total 36

THEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL COGNATE

GTHE Electives 12

____

Theological and Historical Cognate Total 12

____

MBL-ALC Degree Total 52.5

 

M.A. in Biblical Literature with a concentration in Judaic-Christian Studies (MBL-JCSC)

GBIB 618 Matthew (Greek) 3

GBIB 676 Pauline Theology and Early Jewish Thought 3

GBIB 688 Jewish Background to the Gospels 3

GBIB 715 The Bible and Midrash (Hebrew) 3

GBIB 766 Introduction to Rabbinic Thought and Literature 3

GBIB 756 Thesis Research and Proposal 3

GBIB 757 Thesis Writing 3

GBIB Bible or Judaic-Christian electives 9

Choice of one of the following sequences (second Biblical language): 6

GBIB 500/501 Greek Synthesis I and II and PRFT 053 Greek Proficiency

GBIB 510/511 Hebrew Synthesis I and II and PRFT 052 Hebrew Proficiency

____

MBL-JCSC Concentration Total 36

THEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL COGNATE

GBIB 611 Theology of the Old Testament 3

GBIB 621 Theology of the New Testament 3

GBIB 681 Historical Theology 3

GTHE Elective 3

____

Theological and Historical Cognate Total 12

____

MBL-JCSC Degree Total 52.5

 

Theological and Historical Studies (MTH) Master of Arts

The Master of Arts in Theological and Historical Studies is designed to prepare students for teaching and research in historical and theological studies, the communication of the doctrines of the faith, and the history of Christianity.

This program enables students to understand and communicate the basic historical and theological heritage of the Christian faith and to increase their appreciation of the historical roots of the doctrinal emphases within their particular communities of faith. It provides students with a firsthand acquaintance with the people, creeds, liturgies, and systems of faith and order that comprise the basic elements of their heritage. A cognate is required to provide students with a Biblical foundation and context for their studies.

The students’ abilities to understand and evaluate the issues and dynamics in the contemporary communities of faith and in contemporary theology are enhanced, thus strengthening their abilities to defend their faith.

Historical theology provides the conceptual framework for the Master of Arts in Theological and Historical Studies program. Proficiency in theological German is required for graduation. Another language, however, may be substituted with the approval of the area committee when such a language is especially relevant and clearly demonstrated for the successful completion of a course of study.

 

Prerequisite Courses*

Applicants who have not majored in theological and historical studies in their baccalaureate studies are required to complete a minimum of 15 semester hours of theological and historical prerequisites. Applicants should satisfy these requirements during the first year of enrollment. Credit hours from prerequisite/leveling courses do not apply toward the graduate degree.

GTHE 551 and 561 Systematic Theology I and II 6

GTHE 571 and 581 Church History I  and II 6

Choice of one of the following: 0-3

GTHE 517 Seminar in Theological Research

PRFT 049 Theological Research Proficiency Exam

____

Prerequisites Total 12-15

*Because theological German is a required part of the Master of Arts in Theological and Historical Studies, it is suggested that applicants complete two years of modern German in their baccalaureate programs.

ORU Distinctive and assessment Courses

PRFT 056 Entry-Level Assessment 0.5

PRFT 057 Mid-Level Assessment 0

PRFT 058 Candidacy-Level Assessment 0.5

PRFT 059 Whole Person Assessment 0

GHPE 503 Graduate Health Fitness* 1

GTHE 510 Holy Spirit Empowerment in Life andMinistry 2

Choice of one of the following: 0.5

GHPE 515 Graduate Aerobics

GHPE 525 Graduate Walk for Fitness

HPE Activity course  (003-100)

ORU Distinctives and Assessment Total 4.5

*Students who completed Health Fitness I and II as ORU undergraduates need to substitute an activities course for GHPE 503, which may decrease the degree total by .5 credit hour.

Theological/Historical Studies

GTHE 624 Christian Apologetics 3

GTHE 631 Theological German 3

GTHE 681 Historical Theology 3

GTHE 756 Thesis Research and Proposal 3

GTHE 757 Thesis Writing 3

PRFT 054 Biblical Language Proficiency 0

GTHE Theological/Historical electives 21

____

Theological/Historical Studies Total 36

Biblical Literature Cognate

GBIB 507 Biblical Hermeneutics 3

GBIB 551 Old Testament Synthesis 3

GBIB 571 New Testament Synthesis 3

GBIB Biblical literature elective 3

____

Biblical Literature Cognate Total 12

____

M.A. in Theological and Historical Studies Degree Total52.5

 

Professional Degrees

The master of arts degree can be earned in the following professional degree programs:

  • Christian Counseling (with an optional concentration in marital and family therapy)
  • Missions
  • Practical Theology (with an optional concentration in either teaching ministries or urban ministry)

The professional master of arts degree programs prepare candidates for specialized ministries within the local church, church-related agencies, or other professional settings. These programs provide students with the theories, skills, and practical abilities necessary to perform effectively the ministry to which they are called. They also provide the general Biblical and theological understanding necessary for specialized ministries or foundational studies necessary for pursuing doctoral studies.

 

Practicum/Internship

Each professional master of arts degree program requires at least one semester of supervised experience in the chosen area of concentration. The practicum and/or internship offers an opportunity for students to use the principles and skills learned in the classroom. It also provides opportunities to observe professional models of leadership and ministry. Students in practicums, internships, and field education courses are charged a professional liability insurance fee.

 

Graduation Requirements

Before candidates for the professional master of arts degree graduate, they must pass at least 58 or 64 semester hours of coursework, depending on their degree. They must complete all prerequisites, satisfy all proficiencies, complete the professional evaluation, and have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00.

 

Christian Counseling (CCL) Master of Arts

The Master of Arts in Christian Counseling program (CCL) is designed to prepare students for professional licensure in qualifying them for the specialized ministry of counseling in the contexts of clinical settings, the local church, or church-related agencies. The program enables students to thoughtfully integrate and ethically implement the most effective models and theories of counseling with a coherent Biblical/theological perspective and sensitivity to the Holy Spirit's activity. Since helping hurting people is an essential element of the gospel, this program equips students to therapeutically respond to the opportunities of global diversity in fascilitating healing and wholeness in all areas of life. Three options in the CCL degree are offered:

•M.A. in Christian Counseling (preparation for Licensed Professional Counselor) (LPC)

•M.A. in Christian Counseling, with a concentration in Marital and Family Therapy (preparation for Licensed Marital and Family Therapist) (LMFT)

•M.A. in Christian Counseling, with a concentration in Addictions Counseling Concentration (preparation for Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor) (LADC)

All three options share the same common core, ORU distinctives and proficiencies, and Biblical and theological foundations courses.

Because students are called to the counseling ministry at all stages of life, no counseling preprequisites are required. The courses within the degree, however, are sequential and need to be completed in a specified order. Advisors guide students in making these selections.

Students are required to pass the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Exam (CPCE). This exam is offered every semester and is designed to prepare students for the state licensure exam. A fee of $50 is associated with this exam.

 

State Licensure

The M.A. in Christian Counseling program is designed to prepare students to meet the licensure requirements for Licensed Professional Counselors (LPC) Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor (LADC), and for Licensed Marital and Family Therapists (LMFT). While licensure requirements vary across states, certain core courses tend to be standard. Students are encouraged to contact individual state licensing offices to determine if any additional coursework is needed. Courses required for Oklahoma licensure are included in program requirements. Advisors are available to help students design their degree plans accordingly.

 

Prerequisite Courses*

GBIB 515 Introduction to Biblical Literature 3

GTHE 510 Holy Spirit Empowerment in Life amd Ministry 2

GTHE 518 Introduction to Theology 3

____

Prerequisites Total 8

*Credit hours from prerequisite courses do not apply toward the graduate degree. Some of these courses can be waived for students who have equivalent undergrauate courses. Approval is granted by the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry.

 

ORU Distinctive, assessment and proficiency Courses

PRFT 056 Entry-Level Assessment 0.5

PRFT 057 Mid-Level Assessment 0

PRFT 058 Candidacy-Level Assessment 0.5

PRFT 059 Whole Person Assessment 0

PRFT 064 Introduction to Counseling Practicum/Internship 0.5

PRFT 065 Counseling Preparation Comprehensive Exam 0

GHPE 503 Graduate Health Fitness* 1

Choice of one of the following: 0 5

GHPE 515 Graduate Aerobics

GHPE 525 Graduate Walk for Fitness

HPE Activity course

____

ORU Distinctive, Assessment and Proficiency Total 3.0

*Students who completed Health Fitness I and II as ORU undergraduates need to substitute an activity course for GHPE 503, which may decrease the degree total by .5 credit hour.

 

Core

GCSL 580 Professional Issues in Counseling 3

GCSL 624 Counseling Diverse Populations 3

GCSL 630 Counseling Methods 3

GCSL 635 Human Growth and Development 3

GCSL 650 Professional Ethics in Counseling 3

GCSL 679 Vocational Guidance 3

GCSL 681 Group Dynamics 3

GCSL 784 Counseling Research 3

Choice of one of the following: 3

GCSL 724 Testing and Assessment I (PFCC)

GCSL 641 Assessment in Marriage and Family Therapy (MFTC)

GCSL 685 Assessment of Addictive Behaviors (ACC)

____

Core Total 27

 

Professional Experience

GCSL 763 Counseling Practicum 3

GCSL 781 Counseling Internship I 3

GCSL 785 Counseling Internship II 3

____

Professional Experience Total 9

Students pursuing the M.A. in Christian Counseling choose either the Professional Counselor, Addictions Counseling or the Marital and Family Therapy Concentration. 

M.A. in Christian Counseling-Professional Counselor (LPCC)

GCSL 528 Christian Approaches to Counseling 3

GCSL 625 Counseling Theories 3

GCSL 628 Crisis, Trama and Addictions Counseling 3

GCSL 643 Marital and Family Systems Theory 3

GCSL 670 Introduction to Psychopathology* 3

GCSL 675 Marriage and Family Therapy 3

GCSL 722 Counseling Across the Lifespan 3

GCSL 732 Testing and Assessment II 3

____

LPCC Concentration Total 24

____

CCL-LPCC Degree Total 63

*With special permission, students can substitute GCSL 770 Diagnosis and Treatment of Psychopathology for GCSL 670.

 

M.A. in Christian Counseling-Marital and Family Therapy Concentration (MFTC)

GCSL 528 Christian Approaches to Counseling 3

GCSL 628 Crisis, Trauma and Addictions Counseling 3

GCSL 637 Contemporary Family Development 3

GCSL 640 Human Sexuality 3

GCSL 643 Marital and Family Systems Theory 3

GCSL 670 Introduction to Psychopathology* 3

GCSL 675 Marriage and Family Therapy 3

GCSL 722 Counseling Across the Lifespan 3

____

MFTC Concentration Total 24

____

CCL-MFTC Degree Total 63

*With special permission, students can substitute GCSL 770 Diagnosis and Treatment of Psychopathology for GCSL 670.

 

M.A. IN CHRISTIAN COUNSELING-Addictions counseling CONCENTRATION (AcC)

GCSL 528 Christian Approaches to Counseling 3

GCSL 628 Crisis, Trama and Addictions Counseling 3

GCSL 631 Addiction in the Family Counseling 3

GCSL 643 Marital and Family Systems Theory 3

GCSL 644 Addictions in the Family Theory 3

GCSL 670 Introduction to Psychopathology* 3

GCSL 740 Drug and Alcohol Counseling Theory 3

GCSL 750 Pharmacology of Drugs and Abuse 3

____

ACC Concentration Total 24

____

CCL-ACC Degree Total 63

 *With special permission, students can substitute GCSL 770 Diagnosis and Treatment of Psychopathology for GCSL 670.

 

Missions (MSNS) Master of Arts

The Master of Arts in Missions is a specialized program designed to train competent professionals to carry the healing gospel “where God’s light is dim, where His voice is heard small, where His healing power is not known, even to the uttermost bounds of the earth....” The program presents a well-rounded philosophy of missions with emphases on Biblical principles, the ministry of healing, worldwide evangelism, church planting, and methods of effective cross-cultural communication. It prepares students for effective cross-cultural ministry in foreign missions organizations, home missions organizations, and other related ministries.

Applicants for the Master of Arts in Missions should have completed 3 prerequisite semester hours as listed below in their baccalaureate degree programs. Students who have not met this requirement at the time of matriculation must enroll in the required prerequisite courses. These courses should be selected in consultation with the faculty advisor. Credit hours from prerequisite courses do not apply toward the graduate degree.

Prerequisite Courses

Choice of one of the following: 0-3

GTHE 517 Seminar in Theological Research

PRFT 049 Theological Research Proficiency Exam

____

Prerequisites Total 0-3

 

ORU Distinctive and assessment Courses

PRFT 056 Entry-Level Assessment 0.5

PRFT 057 Mid-Level Assessment 0

PRFT 058 Candidacy-Level Assessment 0.5

PRFT 059 Whole Person Assessment 0

GHPE 503 Graduate Health Fitness* 1

GTHE 510 Holy Spirit Empowerment in Life  and Ministry 2

Choice of one of the following: 0.5

GHPE 515 Graduate Aerobics

GHPE 525 Graduate Walk for Fitness

HPE Activity course

____

ORU Distinctive and Assessment Courses Total 4.5

*Students who completed Health Fitness I and II as ORU undergraduates need to substitute an activities course for GHPE 503, which may decrease the degree total by .5 credit hour.

  

Missions studies

PRM 519 Missionary Basics 3

PRM 544 Developing Global Missional Churches 3

PRM 673 Introduction to Pastoral Care 3

PRM 575 Anthropology for Ministry 3

PRM 578 Globalizing Theology 3

PRM 773 Language Acquisition 1

PRM 775 Missionary Internship 3

PRM Missions electives 6

____

Missions Studies Total 25

 

Biblical/Theological Cognate

GBIB 507 Biblical Hermeneutics 3

GBIB 551 Old Testament Synthesis 3

GBIB 571 New Testament Synthesis 3

GBIB Electives 3

PRM 516 Theology and History of Global Missions 3

GTHE 518 Introduction to Theology 3

GTHE Elective 3

____

Biblical and Theological Cognate Total 21

____

Degree Total 50.5

 

Practical Theology (MPT) Master of Arts

The Master of Arts in Practical Theology is designed to equip graduates for effective ministry in the local church, para-church organizations, and other ministry contexts. The degree provides a foundation in ministerial theory and practice that can assist students to pursue ministry vocations. It seeks to develop the essential knowledge and skills for lay positions in the church or specialized professions in both church and community.

Three options in the Master of Arts in Practical Theology degree are offered:

  • M.A. in Practical Theology (MPT)
  • M.A. in Practical Theology with a concentration in teaching ministries (MPT-TMC)
  • M.A. in Practical Theology with a concentration in urban ministry (MPT-UMC)

These options share the the same prerequisites, ORU distinctives, and Biblical/theological courses.

This degree program prepares leaders by increasing their competence in and understanding of the Word of God through hermeneutical and study skills and by developing a theological framework for their understanding of the teaching of Scripture and for the practices of ministry. In addition to a strong Biblical and theological foundation, the curriculum is flexible enough to meet the demands of both professional and lay positions.

The degree program is structured to provide a strong Biblical/theological/practical ministry foundation for leadership and includes flexibility for students to structure their own programs to meet perceived needs in ministry. The practicum provides supervised practice in church or community contexts that encourage the integration of Biblical and theological understanding with practical ministry strategies.

 

Prerequisite*

Choice of one of the following: 0-3

GTHE 517 Seminar in Theological Research

PRFT 049 Theological Research Proficiency Exam

____

Prerequisite Course Total 0-3

*Credit hours from prerequisite courses do not apply toward the graduate degree.

 

ORU Distinctive and assessment courses

PRFT 056 Entry-Level Assessment 0.5

PRFT 057 Mid-Level Assessment 0

PRFT 058 Candidacy-Level Assessment 0.5

PRFT 059 Whole Person Assessment 0

GHPE 503 Graduate Health Fitness* 1

GTHE 510 Holy Spirit Empowerment in Life and Ministry 2

Choice of one of the following: 0.5

GHPE 515 Graduate Aerobics

GHPE 525 Graduate Walk for Fitness

HPE Activity course

____

ORU Distinctive and Assessment Courses Total 5.5

*Students who completed Health Fitness I and II as ORU undergraduates need to substitute an activities course for GHPE 503, which may decrease the degree total by .5 credit hour.

 

Biblical/Theological Foundations

GTHE 518 Introduction to Theology* 3

GTHE 519 Church History: An Introduction** 3

GBIB 507 Biblical Hermeneutics 3

GBIB 551 Old Testament Synthesis 3

GBIB 571 New Testament Synthesis 3

____

Biblical/Theological Foundations Total 15

*Students may also choose to complete GTHE 551 Systematic Theology I or GTHE 561 Systematic Theology II. Students in the modular program must complete either GTHE 551 or GTHE 561 in lieu of GTHE 518.

**Students may also choose to complete GTHE 571 Church History I or GTHE 581 Church History II. Students in the modular program must complete either GTHE 571 or GTHE 581 in lieu of GTHE 519.

 

Students pursuing the Master of Arts in Practical Theology choose one of the following three concentrations. 

M.A. in Practical Theology (PTC)

PRM 660 Theology for Spirit-Empowered Ministry 3

PRM 673 Introduction to Pastoral Care* 3

FED 750 Ministry Practicum 3

PRM Missions/church growth/evangelism elective 3

PRM Elective** 3

Undesignated Electives 9

Choice of one of the following two courses** 3

PRM 560 Teaching the Bible

PRM 663 Text to Sermon

____

PTC Concentration Total 27

*Students may also complete PRM 656 Adult Learners. Students in the modular program can choose to enroll in PRM 626 Biblical Counseling.

**Students in the modular program may also complete either PRM 549 Foundations of Teaching Ministries or PRM 661 Introduction to Preaching.

____

MPT-PTC Degree Total 47.5

 

M.A. in Practical Theology-Teaching Ministries Concentration (TMC)

PRM 549 Foundations of Teaching Ministries 3

PRM 635 Human Growth and Development 3

PRM 659 Administration of Teaching Ministries* 3

PRM 660 Theology for Spirit-Empowered Ministry 3

FED 755 Teaching Ministries Practicum 3

Choice of one of the following two courses: 3

GTHE 660 Ethics and Contemporary Issues

GTHE 661 Introduction to Christian Ethics

Choice of one of the following courses: 3

PRM 554 Bible Institute Education

PRM 560 Teaching the Bible

PRM 656 Adult Learners

PRM 788 Leadership in Ministry

FED 501 Teaching Methodology

Choice of two of the following courses:** 6

PRM 554 Bible Institute Education

PRM 558 Spiritual Formation and Discipleship

PRM 560 Teaching the Bible

PRM 657 Special Projects in Education and Ministry Settings

PRM 673 Introduction to Pastoral Care

PRM 746 Contemporary Issues in Teaching

PRM 757 Family Education

PRM 788 Leadership in Ministry

____

TMC Concentration Total 27

*Students in the modular program may also take PRM 554 Bible Institute Education, PRM 560 Teaching the Bible or PRM 788 Leadership in Ministry.

**Suggested electives for students in the modular program include PRM 558 Spiritual Formation and Discipleship, PRM 673 Introduction to Pastoral Care and PRM 788 Leadership in Ministry.

____

MPT-TMC Degree Total 47.5

  

M.A. in Practical Theology-Urban Ministries Concentration (UMC)

PRM 553 Ministry in the Urban Setting 3

PRM 660 Theology for Spirit-Empowered Ministry 3

PRM 661 Introduction to Preaching 3

PRM 664 Communicating Christ in  Urban and Global Contexts 3

PRM 673 Introduction to Pastoral Care* 3

FED 760 Urban Ministry Practicum 3

Choice of three of the following courses: 9

GTHE 628 Contemporary Cults**

PRM 511 Ministering Cross-Culturally**

PRM 544 Developing Global Missional Churches

PRM 573 Major Religions of the World

PRM 575 Anthropology for Ministry**

PRM 578 Globalizing Theology

PRM 651 Church in the Contemporary World

PRM 744 Church Planting in the 21st Century**

PRM 758 Seminar in Practices of Healing Ministry**

____

UMC Concentration Total 27

*Students may also complete PRM 656 Adult Learners. Students in the modular program may also choose to complete GCSL 626 Principles of Biblical Counseling.

**Suggested electives for students in the modular program.

____

MPT-UMC Degree Total 47.5

 

Doctor of Ministry

The Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.) is an advanced professional degree designed to continue the education of ministers so that they may be spiritually renewed and increasingly effective in their world ministries. The purpose of the program is to help ministers grow in their understandings and interpretations of the Church’s ministry in relation to Biblical, theological, historical, ethical, and practical areas. Students are challenged to develop their ministerial skills and to refine and articulate a theology of ministry while in a setting of ministry. A distinctive of the doctoral program at ORU is the attempt to enable students to understand both the positive and problematic aspects of the charismatic dimensions of ministry.

 

In-Ministry Degree

Students in the doctoral program remain in their full-time ministries. As an in-ministry degree, it is closely integrated with the actual practice of ministry. Students meet in a modular format on campus for a total of six weeks over a two-year period for seminars, workshops, and research clinics. Most of the study/work is done individually in the setting of the local parish or other field of service. Students also complete an applied research project involving research and writing about a ministry situation.

 

Admission Requirements

Candidates applying for admission to the doctoral program should hold a first professional theological degree (M.Div. or the equivalent) with a 3.0 grade point average from an ATS accredited seminary. They should also have a minimum of three years of full-time post-masters degree ministry experience.

Each applicant must submit the following:

  • A biographical statement concerning the call to the ministry and the way in which that call has been expressed to the present (minimum of 500 words).
  • A statement outlining why the applicant desires to pursue the D.Min. degree at Oral Roberts University.
  • Four letters of reference—one from an ecclesiastical overseer (if there is one), one from a Seminary professor, one from a peer in ministry, and one from a knowledgeable lay person.
  • Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate studies to date.
  • International students can request further information from the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry Admissions Office.

The Admissions Committee makes a determination based on all relevant data and policies of the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry. The Admissions Committee may require applicants to submit additional information for evaluation such as a personal interview, psychological test results, a spouse’s endorsement, or a statement of status at another educational institution.

 

Grading

No course grade less than a “B” is accepted. The first grade below a “B” will result in probationary status. Two “C” course grades results in suspension from the doctoral progam.

 

Assessment

Professional and personal assessment is an integral part of the total educational program of the ORU Graduate School of Theology and Ministry. The Doctor of Ministry (DMIN) assessment program draws together the varied influences, experiences, and learning of the students in situations that are intentionally evaluative and advisory. It also helps students to become familiar with degree program goals and outcomes and to understand how they contribute to the achievement of the purpose statement for the Seminary.

The basic components for assessment are professional skills, specialized knowledge, and personal/spiritual development. The purpose is to determine student competencies in relationship to degree program goals. Identified program goals contribute to the overall University mission to prepare professionally competent servant-leaders who are spiritually alive, intellectually alert, physically disciplined, and socially adept.

Various artifacts have been designated to demonstrate the extent to which program goals are being achieved, including writing competencies. Information relative to required artifacts is included in course syllabi. An overview of the assessment program is given to all entering students and specific requirements are explained.

Another component of the DMIN assessment program is to determine the student’s progress in the areas of academic and professional competencies, and spiritual, emotional, and social aptitudes. Aptitude for academic research and writing are also considered to determine if the student is capable of successfully completing the Applied Research Project.

At three designated times during the student’s program, a DMIN representative sub-committee audits the student’s overall progress according to a specified rubric. Each session involves a summative assessment that expresses confidence or lack of confidence in the student’s ability to continue in the DMIN program. The sub-committee will make one of the following recommendations:

Student may proceed to the next phase of the DMN program. Any areas of concern and expectations for improvement will be addressed.

Student may proceed on a probationary basis to the next phase of the DMIN program, with the condition that specified recommendations are successfully met.

Student may not proceed further in the DMIN program. The director of the DMIN program communicates the committees’ evaluation to the student.

 

PRFT 710 Entry-Level Assessment Audit

All Doctor of Ministry students entering the seminary are required to enroll in PRFT 710 their first semester. A sub-committee meets at each assessment level to determine a student’s progress in the program.

 

PRFT 720 Mid-Level Assessment Audit

At the end of the first year, students enroll in PRFT 720 Mid-Level Assessment Audit. This mid-level assessment is designed to determine if the competencies required to move to the candidacy level status have been demonstrated by the student. A sub-committee meets at each assessment level to determine a student’s progress in the program.

 

PRFT 730 Candidacy-Level Assessment

During the final semester of enrollment, students enroll in PRFT 730 Candidacy-Level Assessment. The purpose of this assessment is to determine the degree to which the doctoral program goals were achieved. As the capstone assignment of the coursework phase of the D.Min. program, students complete a 12-15 page Comprehensive Exam that includes the following:

  • A theorectical and theological construct
  • An assessment of personal ministry leadership and a personal leadership growth plan
  • An application of concepts, course content and textbook approaches from all coourses in the D.Min. program
  • A doctoral level of reflection to synthesize, analyze and apply concepts

The Comprehensive Exam will be graded by the D.Min. sub-committee. Students must receive a passing grade for PRFT 730 (B or better) to be eligible for committee approval; however, a passing grade does not guarantee approval to continue to the writing phase of the D.Min. program. The committee will also evaluate overall student progress according to an established rubric to determine their progress and aptitude in the following areas.

  • Area(s) of concern indicated in PRFT 720 Mid-Level Assessment
  • Capacity to synthesize and integrate coursework in personal life and ministry
  • Academic, professional, spiritual, emotional and social aptitudes
  • Successful completion of degree program goals and student learning outcomes
  • Capacity for successful completion of the ARP as evidenced by academic research, writing ability and theological reflection skills

One of the following two decisions will be made:

  1. The commitee approves the student to proceed to the writing phase of the Applied Research Project (ARP)
  2. The commitee does not approve the student to proceed to the writting phase of the ARP, thus ending the student's enrollment in the D.Min. program

 

PRFT 759 ePortfolio: Whole Person Assessment

Students will enroll in PRFT 759 ePortfolio: Whole Person Assessment the first semester for the purpose of uploading relevant documents (“artifacts”) to ePortfolio A fee is attached to the course to establish an ePortfolio account. Training on how to use an electronic assessment system occurs online during the first semester.

 

Curriculum and Course Load

The program is built around core courses, a choice of specializations (called “concentrations”), and a research project. A cohort of students follow the same sequence of courses for their core courses but separate as they choose from one of the two specializations available: (1) Pastoral Care and Chaplaincy and (2) Church Ministries and Leadership.

During the project phase, each student chooses an area of special interest and completes an applied research project within that area. Projects focus on such themes of ministry as evangelism, church growth, preaching, Christian education, missions, church and society, administration, and pastoral care and healing.

The full-time load for doctoral students in the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry is 6 hours per semester while enrolled in the coursework phase of the program. One hour per semester is considered full-time when enrolled in the project phase.

Two academic years are required for completion of the coursework. The Applied Research Project (ARP) may be finished during the third year. The entire program must be concluded within five years after entry. Additional information is available in the Doctor of Ministry Handbook.

  

Doctor of Ministry (DMIN)

The Doctor of Ministry degree requires 33.5 hours of course credits which includes 1 credit hour of applied research project.

 
ORU Distinctive and assessment Courses

PRFT 710 Entry-Level Assessment 0

PRFT 720 Mid-Level Assessment 0

PRFT 730 Candidacy-Level Assessment 1

PRFT 759 ePortfolio: Whole Person Assessment 0

GHPE 703 Graduate Health Fitness* 1

Choice of one of the following: 0.5

GHPE 715 Graduate Aerobics

GHPE 725 Graduate Walk for Fitness

____

ORU Distinctive and Assessment Courses Total 2.5

*Students who completed Health Fitness I and II as ORU undergraduates need to substitute an activities course for GHPE 503, which may decrease the degree total by .5 credit hour.

 

Core Courses

DMIN 711 Ministerial Identity and Personal Assessment 3

DMIN 719 Holy Spirit and Healing (online) 3

DMIN 726 Theological Reflection in the Ministry Context 3

DMIN 761 Pastoral Care for Spiritual Formation and Healing 3

DMIN 787 Methods of Ministry Research 3

DMIN 788 Tools of Ministry Research 3

DMIN 790 Research Project 1

____

Core Courses Total 19

 

Doctor of Ministry students choose one of the following concentrations.

Pastoral Care and Chaplaincy Concentration (PCAC)

DMIN 738 Principles of Supervision in Pastoral Care and Chaplaincy 3

DMIN 752 Advanced Workshop: Marriage and Family Ministry 3

DMIN 753 Advanced Workshop in Addictive Behaviors 3

DMIN 758 Pastoral Care and Chaplaincy in the 21st Century 3

____

PCAC Concentration Total 12

 

Church Ministries and Leadership Concentration (CMLC)

DMIN 730 Missional Leadership Strategies for Today’s Church 3

DMIN 732 Leading for Ministry Effectiveness 3

DMIN 735 Communicating the Gospel 3

DMIN 737 Leadership Theory and Practice for the Church 3

____

CMLC Concentration Total 12

____

Degree Total 33.5

 

Year One

Students attend a one-week module in the fall, spring and summer for three on-campus seminars.

  • Fall Seminar I: One-week modular courses

DMIN 711 Ministerial Identity and Personal Assessment (core)

DMIN 735 Communication the Gospel  or DMIN 737 Leadership Theory and Practice for the Church (CMLC) 

DMIN 752 Advanced Seminar in Marriage and Family Ministry  or DMIN 768 Pastoral Care and Chaplaincy in the 21st Century (PCAC)

PRFT 710 Entry-Level Assessment

PRFT 759 ePortfolio: Whole Person Assessment

  • Spring Seminar II: One-week modular courses

DMIN 761 Pastoral Care for Spiritual Formation and Healing (core)

DMIN 730 Missional Leadership Strategies for Today’s Church  or DMIN 732 Leading for Ministry Effectiveness (CMLC)

DMIN 738 Principles of Supervision in Pastoral Care and Chaplaincy or DMIN 753 Advanced Workshop in Addictive Behaviors (PCAC)

PRFT 710 Entry-Level Assessment**

PRFT 759 ePortfolio: Whole Person Assessment**

** Only for students who begin their program of study in spring.

  • Summer Seminar III: One-week modular course and one online course

DMIN 717 Theological Issues and Themes for Ministry (core)

DMIN 785 Foundations of Ministry Research* (core) (online)

PRFT 720 Mid-Level Assessment Audit

*International students complete this course in a hybrid format and come to campus for 2 1/2 days.

 

Year Two

Students attend a one-week module in the fall, spring and summer for three on-campus workshops.

  • Fall Workshop I: One-week modular course and one online course

DMIN 726 Theological Reflection in the Ministry Context (core)

DMIN 735 Communicating the Gospel or Leadership Theory and Practice for the Church (CMLC)

DMIN 752 Advanced Seminar in Marriage and Family Ministry or DMIN 768 Pastoral Care and Chaplaincy (PCAC)

  • Spring Workshop II: One-week modular courses

DMIN 788 Tools of Ministry Research (core)

DMIN 730 Missional Leadership Strategies for Today's Church or DMIN 732 Leading for Ministry Effectiveness (CMLC)

DMIN 738 Principles of Supervision in Pastoral Care and Chaplaincy or DMIN 753 Advanced Workshop in Addictive Behaviors (PCAC)

PRFT 730 Candidacy Level Assessment

  • Summer Workshop III

 

GHPE 703

GHPE 715 Graduate Aerobics or GHPE 725 Graduate Walk for Fitness 

 

Year Three

During the third year, each student works on an approved topic for the research project. All D.Min. students must work with their supervisors and with the Doctor of Ministry Office to ensure that all steps and requirements are being correctly fulfilled. The applied research project involves implementing the project, writing the paper that presents the research project and results, and defending the project before a committee. The research project may extend beyond year three; however, the entire D.Min. program must be completed within five years.

 

Departmental Courses

Course descriptions for the courses listed below are at the end of this catalog. Course descriptions are alphabetical by the prefix.

Doctor of Ministry

DMIN 711 Ministerial Identity and Personal Assessment

DMIN 719 Holy Spirit and Healing

DMIN 726 Theological Reflection in the Ministry Context

DMIN 730 Missional Leadership Strategies for Today’s Church

DMIN 732 Leading for Ministry Effectiveness

DMIN 735 Communicating the Gospel

DMIN 737 Leadership Theory and Practice in the Church

DMIN 738 Principles of Supervision in Pastoral Care and Chaplaincy

DMIN 740 Clinical Pastoral Education

DMIN 749 Directed Study

DMIN 752 Advanced Seminar in Marriage and Family Ministry

DMIN 753 Advanced Workshop for Addictive Behaviors

DMIN 761 Pastoral Care for Spiritual Formation and Healing

DMIN 768 Pastoral Care and Chaplaincy in the 21st Century

DMIN 788 Tools of Ministry Research

DMIN 789 Methods of Ministry Research

DMIN 790 Research Project

DMIN 999 Elective

 

Field Education

FED 501 Teaching Methodology

FED 672 Field Education (Church)

FED 673 Field Education (Community)

FED 750 Ministry Practicum

FED 755 Teaching Ministries Practicum

FED 760 Urban Ministry Practicum

FED 780 Pastoral Care and Chaplaincy Practicum

FED 781 Pastoral Internship

FED 999 Elective

 

Biblical Literature—Old Testament

GBIB 510 Hebrew Synthesis I

GBIB 511 Hebrew Synthesis II

GBIB 551 Old Testament Synthesis

GBIB 561 Old Testament Hermeneutics and Exegesis (Hebrew)

GBIB 608 Eighth Century Prophets

GBIB 609 Exilic Prophets

GBIB 611 Theology of the Old Testament

GBIB 632 Isaiah (Hebrew)

GBIB 633 Pentateuch (Hebrew)

GBIB 634 Wisdom Literature

GBIB 635 Theophanies/Hebrew Scripture (Hebrew)

GBIB 636 Exodus (Hebrew)

GBIB 637 Deuteronomy (Hebrew)

GBIB 646 Ancient Near East Civilization

GBIB 657 Old Testament History

GBIB 663 Syriac

GBIB 704 Psalms (Hebrew)

GBIB 712 Akkadian

GBIB 714 Ugaritic

GBIB 715 The Bible and Midrash (Hebrew)

GBIB 761 Advanced Syriac

GBIB 764 Biblical Aramaic

GBIB 766 Introduction to Rabbinic Thought and Literature

GBIB 767 Seminar in Old Testament

GBIB 774 Jewish Apocalyptic Literature

 

Biblical Literature—Old and New Testament

GBIB 507 Biblical Hermeneutics

GBIB 515 Introduction to Biblical Literature

GBIB 516 Biblical Eschatology

GBIB 552 Historical Geography of Palestine

GBIB 645 Biblical Archaeology

GBIB 648 Israel Study Abroad Seminar

GBIB 744 Septuagint (Greek and Hebrew)

GBIB 749 Directed Study

GBIB 754 Coptic Studies

GBIB 755 Classical Egyptian

GBIB 756 Thesis Research and Proposal

GBIB 757 Thesis Writing

 

Biblical Literature—New Testament

GBIB 500 Greek Synthesis I

GBIB 501 Greek Synthesis II

GBIB 517 Paul: Mission and Message

GBIB 556 The Life and Teachings of Jesus (Matthew Mark and Luke)

GBIB 571 New Testament Synthesis

GBIB 573 I Corinthians

GBIB 581 New Testament Hermeneutics and Exegesis (Greek)

GBIB 583 The Parables of Jesus in Their Jewish Context

GBIB 589 History and Culture of New Testament Times

GBIB 618 Matthew (Greek)

GBIB 619 Romans (English)

GBIB 621 Theology of the New Testament

GBIB 623 Galatians and James: Law and Gospel

GBIB 624 Luke

GBIB 625 Gospel and Letters of John

GBIB 626 The Book of Acts

GBIB 628 Patterns of Ministry in the New Testament

GBIB 630 Pastoral Epistles

GBIB 676 Pauline Theology and Early Jewish Thought

GBIB 682 Synoptic Gospels (Greek)

GBIB 683 Mark (Greek)

GBIB 684 Charismata in Early Christianity

GBIB 688 The Jewish Background to the Gospels

GBIB 692 Parables of Jesus

GBIB 697 Jewish and Christian Prayer in the Time of Jesus

GBIB 729 Colossians/Ephesians (Greek)

GBIB 768 Epistle to the Hebrews

GBIB 769 Seminar in New Testament

GBIB 777 Exegesis of Romans (Greek)

GBIB 787 Cross/Resurrection in the New Testament (Greek)

GBIB 999 Elective

 

Graduate Counseling

GCSL 528 Christian Approaches to Counseling

GCSL 571 Theology of Counseling

GCSL 580 Professional Issues in Counseling

GCSL 624 Counseling Diverse Populations

GCSL 625 Counseling Theories

GCSL 626 Principles of Biblical Counseling

GCSL 628 Crisis, Trauma and Addictions Counseling

GCSL 630 Counseling Methods

GCSL 631 Addiction in the Family Counseling

GCSL 635 Human Growth and Development

GCSL 637 Contemporary Family Development

GCSL 640 Human Sexuality

GCSL 641 Assessment in Marital and Family Therapy

GCSL 643 Marital and Family Systems Theory

GCSL 644 Addition in the Family Theory

GCSL 650 Professional Ethics in Counseling

GCSL 670 Introduction to Psychopathology

GCSL 671 Religion and Personality

GCSL 675 Marriage and Family Therapy

GCSL 679 Vocational and Occupational Guidance

GCSL 681 Group Dynamics

GCSL 685 Assessment of Addictive Behavior

GCSL 722 Counseling Across the Lifespan

GCSL 724 Testing and Assessment I

GCSL 732 Testing and Assessment II

GCSL 740 Drug and Alcohol Counseling Theory

GCSL 760 Cognitive Therapy

GCSL 762 Narrative Therapy

GCSL 763 Counseling Practicum

GCSL 750 Pharmacology of Drugs and Abuse

GCSL 770 Diagnosis and Treatment of Psychopathology

GCSL 781 Counseling Internship I

GCSL 784 Counseling Research

GCSL 785 Counseling Internship II

GCSL 999 Elective

 

Theological/Historical Studies—Ethics

GTHE 660 Ethics and Contemporary Issues

GTHE 661 Introduction to Christian Ethics

GTHE 768 Ethics in Pastoral Ministry

GTHE 769 Ethics of Jesus

 

Theological and Historical Studies—Historical/Theological

GTHE 508 Signs and Wonders and the Healing Ministry

GTHE 510 Holy Spirit Empowerment in Life and Ministry

GTHE 516 Theology and History of Global Mission

GTHE 517 Seminar in Theological Research

GTHE 518 Introduction to Theology

GTHE 519 Church History: An Introduction

GTHE 539 Black Church History and Theology

GTHE 551 Systematic Theology I

GTHE 561 Systematic Theology II

GTHE 571 Church History I

GTHE 573 Major Religions of the World

GTHE 581 Church History II

GTHE 611 Theology of the Old Testament

GTHE 621 Theology of the New Testament

GTHE 622 The Doctrine of God

GTHE 624 Christian Apologetics

GTHE 631 Theological German

GTHE 632 Theological French

GTHE 638 Contemporary Religious Cults

GTHE 647 The Doctrine of Redemption

GTHE 657 Theology of Martin Luther

GTHE 658 Biblical Authority

GTHE 659 Ecclesiology: Church in the 21st Century

GTHE 663 Charismatic Theology

GTHE 670 Contemporary Theology

GTHE 678 The Theology of Revival and Renewal

GTHE 674 Denominational Polities

GTHE 675 The Early Church Fathers

GTHE 676 The Age of Reformation

GTHE 681 Historical Theology

GTHE 684 Reformed Theology

GTHE 685 Christianity and Islam

GTHE 686 Theology of John Wesley

GTHE 692 Pneumatology

GTHE 694 The Pentecostal/Charismatic Movements in Historical Perspective

GTHE 696 Divine Healing: A Theological and Historical Study

GTHE 700 Post-Modernism and 21st Century Ministry

GTHE 744 Seminar in Historical Studies

GTHE 745 Seminar in Theological Studies

GTHE 749 Directed Study

GTHE 756 Thesis Research and Proposal

GTHE 757 Thesis Writing

GTHE 760 Christology

GTHE 763 The Biblical Doctrine of Grace

GTHE 999 Elective

 

Proficiencies

PRFT 049 Theological Research Proficiency

PRFT 050 French Proficiency

PRFT 052 Hebrew Proficiency

PRFT 053 Greek Proficiency

PRFT 054 German Proficiency

PRFT 055 Koinonia

PRFT 056 Entry-Level Assessment

PRFT 057 Mid-Program Assessment Audit

PRFT 058 Candidacy-Level Assessment

PRFT 059 Whole Person Assessment

PRFT 061 Counseling Comprehensive

PRFT 062 Assessment III Professional Presentation

PRFT 064 Introduction to Counseling Practicum/Internship

PRFT 065 Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Exam Fee

PRFT 710 Entry-Level Assessment

PRFT 720 Mid-Level Assessment

PRFT 730 Candidacy-Level Assessment

PRFT 759 ePortfolio: Whole Person Assessment

 

Practices of Ministry—Teaching Ministries

PRM 549 Foundations of Teaching Ministries

PRM 554 Bible Institute Education

PRM 558 Spiritual Formation and Discipleship

PRM 560 Teaching the Bible

PRM 635 Human Growth and Development

PRM 650 Multimedia and Computers in Ministry

PRM 656 Adult Learners

PRM 657 Special Projects in Education and Ministry

PRM 659 Administration of Teaching Ministries

PRM 734 Leadership for Team Ministries

PRM 746 Contemporary Issues in Teaching

PRM 750 Teaching Ministries Practicum

PRM 757 Family Education

PRM 758 Seminar in Practices of Ministry

PRM 788 Leadership in Ministry

PRM 793 Church Administration

 

Practices of Ministry—Church Ministry, Missions, and the Minister

PRM 506 Leadership in Context

PRM 511 Ministering Cross-Culturally

PRM 516 Theology and History of Global Mission

PRM 519 Missionary Basics

PRM 544 Developing Global Missional Churches

PRM 553 Ministry in the Urban Setting

PRM 573 Major Religions of the World

PRM 575 Anthropology for Ministry

PRM 578 Globalizing Theology

PRM 582 Introduction to Evangelism

PRM 583 Contextual Urban Evangelism

PRM 635 Human Growth and Development

PRM 650 Multimedia and Computers in Ministry

PRM 651 Church in the Contemporary World

PRM 657 Special Projects in Education and Ministry Settings

PRM 660 Theology for Spirit-Empowered Ministry

PRM 661 Introduction to Preaching

PRM 663 Text to Sermon

PRM 664 Communicating Christ in Urban and Global Contexts

PRM 669 Practice Preaching

PRM 680 Pastoral Ministry Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

PRM 685 Spiritual Warfare and World Views in Conflict

PRM 691 Women in Ministry

PRM 697 Prayer: The Personal Discipline of the Minister

PRM 721 The Minister as Equipper

PRM 734 Leadership for Team Ministries

PRM 744 Church Planting in the 21st Century

PRM 758 Seminar in Practices of Ministry

PRM 766 Preaching on Controversial Issues

PRM 767 The Preacher as Evangelist

PRM 769 Practice Preaching (Persuasive)

PRM 773 Language Acquisition

PRM 775 Missionary Internship

PRM 777 Missiological Research Project

 

Practices of Ministry—Pastoral Care

PRM 673 Introduction to Pastoral Care

PRM 678 Advanced Pastoral Care

PRM 749 Directed Study

PRM 780 Clinical Pastoral Education

PRM 999 Elective