Profiles

Lenore Butay

Lenore Butay

Instructor of Nursing


If you were to visit Butay’s office, you would quickly gather that she has an appreciation for the ocean.  Right below a poster featuring a vivid sunset over tumultuous waves sits a model lighthouse made of wood. What it lacks in a real light it makes up for in exquisite detail.  Butay says that crafts are one of her favorite hobbies outside of the classroom. “I’ve been working on a dollhouse for the last year,” she say. “Getting creative is what I like best.” 
 
Lenore Butay grew up in Maryland and went to Grinnel College in Iowa, then decided to go to nursing school at Crayton University. After graduating as a nurse, she got married, and she and her husband moved to Tulsa so her husband could go to ORU. It was there that she began working at City of Faith as a nurse, eventually moving on to get her masters in nursing at OU. It wasn’t long before she started doing clinical full time.

“I felt like nursing was a call to help people,” she recalls. “Isaiah talks about helping the poor and homeless.  During my years working at City of Faith and then ORU, I have appreciated being with people who are able to pray with and be generous toward the needy. The merging of faith and medicine is truly in practice.”

After she was hired to teach nursing at ORU, Butay has come to realize what a great thing diversity is in a school. “Instead of teaching primarily white upper-class students, I am teaching all ethnicities and socioeconomic classes,” she says. “This is essential because it means we can reach more people groups out there. It’s wonderful.”

Why choose nursing?  Butay says it appealed to her because of it is a highly flexible occupation—in other words, there are many different job opportunities to be had with a nursing degree. “As Christians, we ought to make a special effort to help people,” she insists. And help people she has…as a nurse and as a teacher.  She emphasizes to her students the importance of learning how to study.  “It’s all diligence,” she notes, “You have to know your craft well if you want to make a difference.”