College of Science and Engineering

Kenneth weed, pH.D., DEAN

MISSION STATEMENT:

The College of Science and Engineering at Oral Roberts University trains and equips students in the discovery and application of scientific knowledge for the glory of God and the advancement of His kingdom. Students develop professional competencies in scientific understanding and problem solving skills from a Christian worldview. These tools allow them to respond to God’s call to positively impact the fields of science and engineering and assist in the healing of the human condition.

  

Faculty

Lois Ablin

Associate Professor of Chemistry

B.A., Augustana College, 1961; Ph.D., University of Nebraska, 1970.

Robin Akbar

Assistant Professor of Physics

B.S., University of Panjab, 1964; M.S., 1967.

Stacey Blaylock

Assistant Professor of Social Work

B.S.W., Oral Roberts University, 2011; M.S.W., University of Oklahoma, 2012. 

Rachel Budavich

Instructor of Biology

B.S., Oral Roberts University, 2004; M.A., Case Western Reserve, 2008.

 
Robert Canada

Assistant Professor of Recreation Adminstration

B.S., Memphis State University, 1968; M.Ed., 1973.

 
William B. Collier

Professor of Chemistry

B.S., Oral Roberts University, 1977; M.S., Oklahoma State University, 1981; Ph.D., 1983.

 
Tony Domeck

Instructor of Leisure

B.S., University of Idaho, 1986; M.B.A., Embry Riddle University, 1989.

 
Calvin H. Easterling

Professor of Sociology

B.A., McMurry University, 1972; M.A., Stephen F. Austin State University, 1974; M.Th., Southern Methodist University, 1978; Ph.D., University of North Texas, 1992.

 
Lanny R. Endicott

Associate Professor of Social Work

B.S., Southwest Missouri State University, 1966; M.R.E., Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1971; M.S.S.W., University of Missouri, 1971; D.Min., Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1988.

Tracy Farkas

Assistant Professor of Psychology

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 2002; M.Ed., University of Oklahoma, 2008; Ph.D. 2014.

 
Randall Feller

Professor of Psychology, and Chair of the Behavioral Sciences Department

B.M.E., Oral Roberts University, 1981; M.S., Oklahoma State University, 1987; Ph.D., 1991.

 
Joel Gaikwad

Professor of Biology and Chair of the Biology and Chemistry Department

B.S., University of Poona, 1981; M.S., 1983; Ph.D., Indian Institute of Science, 1991.

 
 

 

 
Bill gordon

Associate Professor of Fitness

B.S.E., John Brown Universit, John Brown University, 1982; M.Ed., University of Central Oklahoma, 1995; Ed.D., Oral Roberts University, 2004.

 
Elena G. Gregg

Associate Professor of Physics

B.S., St. Petersburg State University1977; M.S., 1980; Ph.D., State Optical Institute of St.Petersburg, 1995.

 
 
Dominic M. Halsmer

Professor of Engineering

B.S., Purdue University, 1985; M.S., 1986; Ph.D., University of California, 1992; P.E., 1995.

 
 
Jayne Ann Harder

Assistant Professor of Mathematics

B.A. University of Oklahoma, 1991; M.A., University of Texas, 1995; Ph.D., 1999.

 

 

Gwetheldene Holzmann

Associate Professor of Science Education

B.A., Malone College, 1976; M.A., Regent University, 1983; Ed.D., College of Willia and Mary, 1994.

 
 
Fritz Huber

Associate Professor of Health and Exercise Science; and Chair of the Health, Leisure, and Sport Sciences Department

B.Ed., University of Toledo, 1978; M.S., University of Oklahoma, 1985; Ed.D., University of Northern Colorado, 1991.

 
 

 

Scarlet Jost

Assistant Professor of Health and Exercise Science

B.S., Illinois State University, 1975; M.S., Western Illinois University, 1982.

Catherine Klehm

Associate Professor of Chemistry

B.S., Oral Roberts University, 1990; M.Ed., Northeastern State University, 1992; Ed.D., Oklahoma State University, 2001.

 
John Korstad

Professor of Biology

B.A., B.S., California Lutheran College, 1972; M.S., California State University, 1980; M.S., University of Michigan, 1979; Ph.D., 1980.

Andrew Lang

Professor of Mathematics and Chair of the Computing and Mathematics Department

B.S., University of Kent, 1991; M.S., University of Tulsa, 1993; Ph.D., University of Missouri, 1998.

 
 
Robert Leland

Professor of Engineering

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1978; M.S.E., University of California, 1982; Ph.D., 1988.

 

  
Sophie Xiao Fan Liu

Professor of Engineering

B.S., Sichuan University, 1982; M. Eng., Xidian University, 1992; Ph.D., National University of Singapore, 1997.

 

 
 
Leighanne Locke

Assistant Professor of Mathematics

B.S., Oral Roberts University, 1997; M.A., University of Tulsa, 1999.

 
Xiaomin Ma

Professor of Engineering

B.S., Anhui University, 1984; M.S., Beijing University of Aerospace and Aeronautics, 1989; Ph.D. Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, 1999.

 
Nancy Mankin

Assistant Professor of  Physical Education

B.S., Central State University, 1980; M.Ed., 1993.

 

 
John Matsson

Professor of Engineering and Chair of the Engineering Department

M.S.E., Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, 1988; L.E., 1991; Ph.D., 1994.

 

 
 
Philip Nelson

Assistant Professor of Psychology

B.S., Oral Roberts University, 2010; M.A., Biola University, 2012.

 

 
 
 
Brittany Oelze

Assistant Professor of Social Work

B.S.W., Oral Roberts University, 2008; M.S.W., Wichita State University, 2009.

 
J. Bryan Osborne

Instructor of Computer Science

B.S., Arkansas State University, 1988; M.S., Texas Tech University, 1994.

William P. Ranahan, II

Associate Professor of Biology

B.S., Oral Roberts University, 2005; Ph.D., Indiana University, 2013.

 

 

Hal Reed

Professor of Biology

B.S., Oral Roberts University, 1975; M.S., Texas A&M University, 1978; Ph.D., Washington State University, 1982.

 

 

Terry Shannon

Assistant Professor of Sports Management

B.S., Southeastern Oklahoma State University, 1989; M.Ed., East Central University, 1995; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University, 2017.

 

 
CONNIE SJOBERG

Associate Professor of Psychology

B.M.E., Oral Roberts University, 1977; M.S., Oklahoma State University, 1990; Ph.D., 1999.

 

 

Glenn Smith

Instructor of Health and Exercise Science

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1970; M.S., 1971.

 

 

 
Debra Olson Sowell

Professor of Mathematics

B.A., University of South Dakota, 1971; M.A.T., University of Nebraska, 1975; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University, 1996.

 

 
Robert C. Stewart

Professor of Chemistry

B.Sc., Eastern Nazarene College, 1971; M.A., Oral Roberts University, 2006; M.S., John Hopkins University, 1975; Ph.D., 1976.

 

 

 
George X. Thyvelikakath

Professor of Chemistry

B.S., S.H. College, University of Kerala, 1965; M.S., University of Southwestern Louisiana, 1971; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University, 1975.

 

 

 
 
celestino velásquez

Assistant Professor of Biology

B.S., Oral Roberts University, 2013; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 2017.

 
Angela Watson

Assistant Professor of Psychology

B.S.E., Arkansas State University, 1989; M.A., Oral Roberts University, 2006; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University, 2011.

 

 

Kenneth M. Weed

Professor of Chemistry and Dean of the College of Science and Engineering

B.S., Oral Roberts University, 1986; M.A., San Diego State University, 1991; Ph.D., University of California, 1993.

 

Daobin Zhang

Associate Professor of Engineering

Dipl., Shenyang Polytechnic University, 1970; M.E., Katholieke Universiteit Leuve, 1986; Ph.D., 1990.

 

 

           

  

University Library Faculty

Myra Bloom

Assistant Professor and Reference Librarian, Bibliographical Instruction

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1995; M.L.I.S., University of Oklahoma, 1998; M.A., Oral Roberts University, 1998.

Dana L. Higeons

Instructor and Head Cataloger/Library Technical and Computer Services

B.A., Phillips University, 1979; M.L.I.S., University of Oklahoma, 1992.

Jane Malcolm

Assistant Professor and Assistant Director of Library Public Services

B.L.A., Oral Roberts University, 1978; M.L.S., Emporia State University, 1979.

Mark Roberts

Professor, Dean of Learning Resources, and Director of the Holy Spirit Research Center

B.A., Mississippi College, 1982; M.A., Ohio State University, 1984; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1995; Ph.D., 2002.

 
Angela R. Sample

Instructor and Reference Librarian

B.S., Drury University, 2005; M.A., University of Missouri, 2007; M.Ed., University of Missouri, 2009; Ph.D., University of Missouri, 2017.

Sally Jo Shelton

Associate Professor and Theological Librarian

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1971; M.L.I.S., University of Oklahoma, 1995; M.A., Oral Roberts University, 2004; Ph.D., Regent University, 2016.

 
Annette Villines

Instructor and Head Reference Librarian

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1971; M.L.S., University of Oklahoma, 1977.

Mary Ann Walker

Instructor and Electronic Reference Librarian

B.S., Lamar University, 1977; M.L.I.S., University of Oklahoma, 2002.

           

 

Emeriti Faculty

Dr. Dave R. Eland

1969-2012

Dr. Ralph Fagin

1972-2012

Dr. Roger D. Hartman

1972-2013

ROBERT KIEL

1991-2017

Dr. C. Thomas Luiskutty

1980-2005

Dr. Hubert E. May

1967-1996

Dr. Nate Meleen

1967-2010

Dr. John Nelson

1971-2004

Dr. John E. Norvell, III

1976-1998

dr. KENNETH PRESTON

1997-2017

Gary L. Ritzhaupt

1990-2015

Dr. Verbal Snook

1965-1997

Dr. L. Duane Thurman

1967-1998

Nina Tucker

1989-2008

Dr. Larry D. Walker

1970-2007

           

  

Behavioral Sciences Department

Randall Feller, Ph.D., Chair 

 

MISSION STATEMENT:

Through its programs, the Behavioral Sciences Department seeks to equip students to compete academically with any comparably educated student from any American college or university. This goal is reached, however, by teaching psychology, social work, and sociology from a distinctly Christian frame of reference. The department's official position is that to know something (e.g., a theory, system of beliefs, etc.) is not necessarily to adopt that knowledge as part of one's own value system. A lack of knowledge preempts one's right to challenge, refute, or otherwise deny any belief system with which one claims to disagree. Therefore, the department is committed to equip students to be knowledgeable as defined by the four professions (psychology, sociology, social work, and social justice) while providing a strong Christian framework with which to evaluate theories, techniques, and beliefs. This allows the department to graduate students who are academically informed, yet Biblically sound.

 

 

Overview

The Behavioral Sciences Department focuses on human behavior ,social structure, and relationships in groups, organizations, and community life. The department offers majors and minors in these areas and has articulation agreements with Tulsa Community College and the University of Oklahoma Graduate School of Social Work for easier transferring to and from those schools and ORU.

The social work program at Oral Roberts University is a professional degree program accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE).

 

 

General Education Courses

The Behavioral Sciences Department contributes to the general education courses that all undergraduate students take. As part of the social sciences requirement of general education, the Behavioral Sciences Department offers five options for fulfilling the social sciences elective: PSY 201 Principles of Psychology, SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology, SOC 201 Marriage and the Family, SOC 323 Child and Family in the Social Context, and SWK 202 Introduction to Social Work.

 

Degree Programs

 

Psychology (B.A./B.S.)

Courses in psychology are designed to give an empirical approach to the study of human behavior, a knowledge of psychological principles, and an acquaintance with contemporary problems. The major is tailored to prepare the student for graduate work in any of the variety of areas within which professional psychologists function. The professional areas include, but are not limited to, the more popular areas of clinical psychology, counseling psychology, and biological psychology. The psychology major program also seeks to assist its students to better understand themselves and others with whom they interact. For this reason, the major is an excellent choice for students eventually planning to be ministers or to work in almost any field.

 

Social Justice (B.A.)

The social justice program will allow students to explore the complexity of social justice issues, identify the roots of inequality, be introduced to a broad range of social justice practices and strategies, prepare for advocacy and activism, and have oppoortunities for inolvement in social justice related activities. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the possibilities and limitations of individual action in addressing social problems and the role of collective action and coalition building. Students can begin to build the skills to become and effective advocate for creating a more just world.

 

Social Work (B.S.W.)

The social work program is a professional degree program accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE). This means that it is recognized nationally as meeting the necessary requirements for preparing graduates to enter beginning social work practice in a variety of settings as generalist social workers.

 

sociology (b.a.)

Sociology is the application of the scientific method to real-world probelms in the social realm. The sociology major allows student to explore an understanding of people and society, including social problems, deviant behavior, families, gender, race and ethnicity, relgion, culture and the life cycle. Sociologists are in demand for many interesting fields, such as college teaching and administration, demographic studies, forensics, criminal justice, ministry and epideniology. The bachelors degree program at Oral Roberts University will more than adequately prepare the student for graduate studies in sociology or a number of fields.

 

 

Minors

The Behavioral Sciences Department offers three minors: psychology, sociology, and social justice.

 

Social Work Articulation Agreements

Articulation agreements are agreements between two educational entities to ease the transfer process for students transferring from one educational institution to the other. The Behavioral Sciences Department is included in two articulation agreements--one with Tulsa Community College (TCC) and one with the University of Oklahoma Graduate School of Social Work.

A student completing the Associate of Science degree in Human Services from Tulsa Community College (TCC) satisfies most general education as well as lower level social work curriculum prerequisites for entering the ORU Social Work Program. It is possible for students to complete the A.S. in Human Services from TCC within a two-year period and complete the B.S.W. degree at ORU within approximately two and a half more years.

Graduates from the ORU Social Work Program are eligible for the one year Advanced Standing Social Work Program at the University of Oklahoma Graduate School of Social Work.

 

Clubs and Organizations

The Social Work Club serves to raise awareness concerning the opportunities available in the professional field of social work and enhance the relationship, communication and cohesiveness of social work students on campus. The club re-organizes each year with new officers, elected by the membership body and involves itself in a variety of service learning activities.

Psi Chi Rho is the ORU psychology club and is one of the best ways for psychology majors, minors and those in psych classes to be informed of all the current events and issues facing the field of psychology. There are four meetings each semester with a wide variety of speakers. This club is a wonderful way to be involved with the Psychology Department, to interact with professors and to connect with fellow students.

 

Awards

In recognition of scholarship, leadership, and ORU lifestyle commitment, the Department of Behavioral Sciences annually honors outstanding students by the presentation of the following awards:

  • Outstanding Psychology Major Senior Award: This recognizes the department’s most worthy graduating senior.
  • Outstanding Social Work Major Senior Award: This recognizes the department’s most worthy graduating senior.
  • Outstanding Psychology Senior Paper: This recognizes the department’s best senior research project.
  • Outstanding Social Work Senior Paper: This recognizes the department’s best senior research project.

 

Psychology Major (PSY) Bachelor of Arts

All psychology majors must take PSY 401 during the fall semester of their junior year, PSY 340 during the spring of their junior year, and PSY 499 during the fall semester of the senior year.
General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science (two lectures and two labs) 8

Mathematics (MAT 232) 3

American History (HIS 101) 3

Government (GOV 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315)

Social Science Elective 3

Choice of one of the following: MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244)

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 62

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

Major

PSY 201 Principles of Psychology 3

PSY 305 Physiological Psychology 3

PSY 322 Psychology of Learning and Motivation 3

PSY 340 Research Design and Analysis 3

PSY 354 History and Systems of Psychology 3

PSY 401 Experimental Psychology Lecture and Lab 3

PSY 499 Senior Paper 3

Choice of three of the following courses: 9

PSY 212 Social Psychology

PSY 250 Behavior Management

PSY 301 Developmental Psychology

PSY 321 Psychology of Personality Development

PSY 323 Psychology Measurements

PSY 338 Abnormal Psychology

PSY 355 Child Psychology

PSY 360 Industrial/Organizational Psychology

PSY 411 Counseling Psychology I

PSY 412 Counseling Psychology II

PSY 423 Advanced Psychology Seminar

____

Major Total 30

Minor 18

Minor and/or Electives 18

____

Degree Total 128

  

Psychology Major (PSY) Bachelor of Science

All psychology majors must take PSY 401 during the fall semester of their junior year, PSY 340 during the spring of their junior year, and PSY 499 during the fall semester of the senior year.
General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science (Four lectures and four labs) 16

Mathematics (MAT 232) 3

American History (HIS 101) 3

Government (GOV 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315)

Social Science Elective 3

Choice of one of the following: MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244)

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 64

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

 

MAJOR

PSY 201 Principles of Psychology 3

PSY 305 Physiological Psychology 3

PSY 322 Psychology of Learning and Motivation 3

PSY 340 Research Design and Analysis 3

PSY 354 History and Systems of Psychology 3

PSY 401 Experimental Psychology Lecture and Lab 3

PSY 499 Senior Paper 3

Choice of three of the following courses: 9

PSY 212 Social Psychology

PSY 250 Behavior Management

PSY 301 Developmental Psychology

PSY 321 Psychology of Personality Development

PSY 323 Psychology Measurements

PSY 338 Abnormal Psychology

PSY 355 Child Psychology

PSY 360 Industrial/Organizational Psychology

PSY 411 Counseling Psychology I

PSY 412 Counseling Psychology II

PSY 423 Advanced Psychology Seminar

____

Major Total 30

Minor 18

Minor and/or Electives 16

____

Degree Total 128

  

social justice Major (soj) Bachelor of Arts

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science (two lectures and two labs) 8

Mathematics (MAT 232) 3

American History (HIS 101) 3

Government (GOV 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315)

Social Science Elective 3

Choice of one of the following: MUS 208, SWK 202, PSY 201, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244)

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 62

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

Major

CHRM 307 Urban Outreach Ministries 3

CHRM 335 Introduction to Evangelism 3

PSY 499 Senior Paper 3

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3

SOC 308 Cultural Anthropology 3

SOC 329 Social Deviancy and Social Control 3

SOC 420 Miniority Group Relations 3

SWK 202 Introduction to Social Work 3

SWK 303 Social Welfare Policy 3

SWK 310 Human Behavior in the Social 3 Environment II

____

Major Total 30

Cognate

Choice of three courses from the following: 9

BUS 361 International Business

EVR 201 Global Development and Sustainability

GOV 311 International Relations

GOV 452 Civil Liberties, Civil Rights, and Social Justice

SWK 381 Child Welfare

____

Cognate Total 9

Minor* 18

Electives 9

____

Degree Total 128

*Choice of nonprofit business minor, which is listed in the College of Business section of this catalog, or the prelaw minor, which is listed in the History, Humanities, and Government section of this catalog. It is recommended that SOJ students with a nonprofit business minor take FIN 244 and MGT 461 for their minor electives. It is recommended that SOJ students with a prelaw minor take GOV 453 and 457 for their minor electives.

 

Social Work Major (SWK) Bachelor of Social Work

The mission of the social work program is to prepare students with a strong Christian grounding to enter entry-level social work practice, in a variety of social work settings, on the baccalaureate (BSW) level and prepare for pursuit of graduate education in social work (MSW).

The goals of the program are to develop students grounded in the Christian faith who are prepared academically and with practice skills for entry-level professional social work practice, in a variety of settings, as generalist social workers; who meet entry qualifications for graduate social work education and who are qualified to apply for licensure on the baccalaureate level in states with licensure laws.

The program, in keeping with the Council on Social Work Education’s (CSWE) focus on competency-based education, prepares students to demonstrate the following competencies:*

1. Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly.

Social workers serve as representatives of the profession, its mission, and its core values. They know the profession’s history. Social workers commit themselves to the profession’s enhancement and to their own professional conduct and growth.

2. Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice.

Social workers have an obligation to conduct themselves ethically and to engage in ethical decision-making. Social workers are knowledgeable about the value base of the profession, its ethical standards, and relevant law.

3. Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments.

Social workers are knowledgeable about the principles of logic, scientific inquiry, and reasoned discernment. They use critical thinking augmented by creativity and curiosity. Critical thinking also requires the synthesis and communication of relevant information.

4. Engage diversity and difference in practice.

Social workers understand how diversity characterizes and shapes the human experience and is critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including age, class, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, political ideology, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation. Social workers appreciate that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experiences mayinclude oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege, power, and acclaim.

5. Advance human rights and social and economic justice.

Each person, regardless of position in society, has basic human rights, such as freedom, safety, privacy,

an adequate standard of living, health care, and education. Social workers recognize the global interconnections of oppression and are knowledgeable about theories of justice and strategies to promote human and civil rights. Social work incorporates social justice practices in organizations, institutions, and society to ensure that these basic human rights are distributed equitably and without prejudice.

6. Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research.

Social workers use practice experience to inform research, employ evidence-based interventions, evaluate their own practice, and use research findings to improve practice, policy, and social service delivery. Social workers comprehend quantitative and qualitative research and understand scientific and ethical approaches to building knowledge.

7. Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment.

Social workers are knowledgeable about human behavior across the life course; the range of social systems in which people live; and the ways social systems promote or deter people in maintaining or achieving health and well-being. Social workers apply theories and knowledge from the liberal arts to understand biological, social, cultural, psychological, and spiritual development.

8. Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver effective social work services.

Social work practitioners understand that policy affects service delivery, and they actively engage in policy practice. Social workers know the history and current structures of social policies and services; the role of policy in service delivery; and the role of practice in policy development.

9. Respond to contexts that shape practice.

Social workers are informed, resourceful, and proactive in responding to evolving organizational, community, and societal contexts at all levels of practice. Social workers recognize that the context of practice is dynamic, and use knowledge and skill to respond proactively.

10. Engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

Professional practice involves the dynamic and interactive processes of engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation at multiple levels. Social workers have the knowledge and skills to practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Practice knowledge includes identifying, analyzing, and implementing evidence-based interventions designed to achieve client goals; using research and technological advances; evaluating program outcomes and practice effectiveness; developing, analyzing, advocating, and providing leadership for policies and services; and promoting social and economic justice.

11. Integrate a personal Christian World View with professional social work values, ethics, and practice.*

Professional practice involves the dynamic and ongoing integration of one’s Christian World View with the values and ethics of the profession; that the professional will embrace the diversity of belief systems of individuals and groups in a respectful, supportive, caring, and nonjudgmental manner.

*Unlike the first 10 competencies, which are from CSWE, the 11th competency is unique to ORU’s social work program.

General Education

Introduction to Whole Persona Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Foreign Language 6                                                                  (2 semesters including 203 level. Spanish recommended.)

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science 8                                                                  (two lectures and two labs including BIO 101)

Mathematics (MAT 232)* 3

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Social Science (BUS 201) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315)

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 62

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

Major*

SWK 202 Introduction to Social Work 3

SWK 302 Research Methods 3

SWK 303 Social Welfare Policy 3

SWK 309 Human Behavior in the Social 3 Environment I

SWK 310 Human Behavior in the Social 3 Environment II

SWK 331 Social Work Practice I 3

SWK 332 Social Work Practice II 3

SWK 333 Social Work Practice III 3

SWK 341 Junior Practicum I 2

SWK 342 Junior Practicum II 2

SWK 404 Social Work Practice IV 2

SWK 405 Senior Seminar 2

SWK 420 Minority Group Relations 3

SWK 443 Senior Practicum I 6

SWK 444 Senior Practicum II 6

SWK 499 Senior Research Paper 3

____

Major Total 50

Cognate*

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3

PSY 201 Principles of Psychology 3

PSY/SOC/SWK Elective** 3

____

Cognate Total 9

Electives 7

____

DegreeTotal 128

*BIO 101, MAT 232, BUS 201, as well as cognate courses and courses in the major, require a grade of “C” or higher.

**The Social Work elective SWK 381 Child Welfare is required for students accepted into the Title IV-E Child Welfare Program.

+Two additional laboratory science lectures and labs may be substituted for foreign language courses for students entering the program from a science background or desiring a science emphasis.

 

Social Work Program Policies

The social work program at Oral Roberts University is a professional degree program accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE). The following information presents policies and procedures of the program. These policies; the degree plan sheet; the program’s mission, goals, and competencies; and a copy of the Educational Policy and Accreditiation Standards of 2008 (EPAS) are provided to all students.

 

Application Procedure

First Stage: Applying for the social work major

Students wanting to be admitted to the social work program need to do the following:

  1. Complete SWK 202 Introduction to Social Work.
  2. Submit a completed application form to the program director.
  3. Be interviewed by a faculty member in the program.
  4. Have a current accumulative GPA of at least 2.25.
  5. Sign a statement to follow the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics.

A committee made up of social work faculty determines the student’s admission into the program. Once admitted to the program, students are assigned a faculty member to provide advisement throughout their social work education at ORU.

 

Second Stage: Applying for senior practicum

Students needing to be admitted to the senior practicum need to do the following:

  1. Prove senior status
  2. Complete prerequisites for eligibility to participate in the senior practicum: SWK Practice I, II, and III, Human Behavior in the Social Environment I and II, Social Welfare Policy, Minority Group Relations, Research Methods, and Junior Practicums I and II
  3. Be interviewed by a field coordinator regarding field placement preferences and practicum fit
  4. Receive faculty approval to proceed with the senior practicum

 

Transfer of Credit Policy

The social work program treats transfer credit on a case-by-case basis. Course and/or practicum credit is not given for life or work experience. Credit is given for comparable practice and foundation courses being transferred from other CSWE accredited schools. Courses being considered for transfer from schools not accredited by the Council will be examined individually, in which case the student needs to produce catalog and other information describing the course(s) in question (e.g., texts, syllabi, etc.). SWK 405 Senior Practicum must be taken at ORU and cannot be transferred from another institution.

 

Continuation in the Program

Continuation in the program is based on the student’s maintenance of a 2.50 GPA average in social work courses and ethical conduct necessary for professional social work practice. Courses taken in the core curriculum must have a grade of “C” or better grade to be counted for social work credit. These courses include all major and cognate courses plus BIO 101 Biology, MAT 232 Statistics, and BUS 201 Principles of Economics I from general education. If the student’s performance falls below the standards for program continuation, then termination procedures may be considered. However, every effort is made to work with a student in this situation by providing advisement, referral for remedial assistance, and/or referral for medical or mental health treatment if appropriate.

 

Termination Policy

In the event a student needs to be terminated from the social work professional program, the following steps are taken:

  1. The program faculty meet together to discuss the student in question.
  2. The student is brought before the faculty or faculty designee (appointed by the director) to discuss concerns and devise a plan for remediation.
  3. Progress is carefully monitored.
  4. Only if the remediation efforts prove unsuccessful is the student considered for termination. A majority of the faculty must agree that the student should be terminated.
  5. The director informs the student of the termination and appoints a faculty member in the program to provide advisement and referral for seeking an alternative academic major.
  6. The student may appeal the decision to terminate to the chair of the Behavioral Sciences Department and to the Dean of the College of Science and Engineering, if desired.

Confidential written documentation is kept on all proceedings of termination. Conditions that may initiate termination proceedings include such behaviors as unethical conduct, unsatisfactory academic performance, inability to work with clients, colleagues, supervisors, and general failure to adhere to professional expectations and standards of the social work profession.

The termination process is initiated only after a reasonable effort has been made to assist the student with gaining access to relevant resources (e.g., medical care, counseling) to help resolve personal issues. In event that a student is terminated from the social work program, assistance is provided to seek another academic major so as to graduate in a timely manner.

 

Student Rights and Responsibilities
  1. Students have the right to be treated in all aspects of the Social Work Program without discrimination on the basis of age, color, disability, ethnicity, gender, national origin, race or religion.
  2. Students have the right to form their own organization.
  3. Students have the right to express grievances and make appeal within the social work program.
  4. Students have the responsibility to pursue excellence in their academic and social work career development.
  5. Students have the responsibility to act ethically and follow the NASW Code of Ethics and the Honor Code Pledge of the university.
  6. Students have the responsibility to behave professionally, as beginning social workers would.
  7. Students have the right and responsibility to provide input into evaluating and planning social work program policies and curriculum.

 

Student Grievance Procedures

In matters of student grievance in the program, the following procedures are followed:

  1. If the grievance pertains to a grade the student received in a course, the student should complete the Petition for Grade Change and the Petition for Policy Exception (available from the Behavioral Sciences Department or the registrar) stating reasons for the requested change. These two forms should be signed by the individual faculty member, social work program director, and chair of the Behavioral Sciences Department. In the event the faculty member does not change the grade, the student may present the case to the program director and, if necessary, to the Behavioral Sciences chair and the dean of the College of Science and Engineering. The dean’s ruling is final.
  2. In situations where there is conflict with a faculty member and/or advisor, the student may present the complaint to the program director for a hearing or mediation. The program director may change the advisor assigned to the student if the change is warranted. If the student has a complaint against the program director, a hearing may be requested with the department chair.

  

sociology major (SOCI) bachelor of arts

GENERAL EDUCATION

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203 level) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science  (two lectures and two labs) 8

Mathematics (MAT 232) 3

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315)

Social Science Elective 3

Choice of one of the following: MUS 208, SWK 202, PSY 201,  BUS 201, FIN 244)

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 62

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

MAJOR

Introduction to Sociology (SOC 101) 3

Marriage and Family (SOC 201) 3

Social Psychology (SOC 212) 3

Research Methods (SOC 302) 3

Cultural Anthropology (SOC 308) 3

Child and Family in the Social Context (SOC 323) 3

Social Deviancy and Social Control (SOC 329) 3

Minority Relations (SOC 420) 3

Social Theory (SOC 440) 3

Senior Paper (SOC 499) 3

____

MajorTotal 30

COGNATE

Choice of three courses from the following: 9

Principles of Economics I (BUS 201)

International Relations (GOV 311)

Civil Liberties, Civil Rights and Social Justice (GOV 452)

Industrial/Organizational Psychology (PSY 360)

History and Systems of Psychology (PSY 354)

____

Cognate Total 9

Minor Total 18

Electives 9

Degree Total 128

Psychology Minor (PSYM)

PSY 201 Principles of Psychology 3

Choice of five courses from the following: 15

PSY 212 Social Psychology

PSY 250 Behavior Management

PSY 301 Developmental Psychology

PSY 305 Physiological Psychology

PSY 321 Psychology of Personality Development

PSY 322 Psychology of Learning

PSY 323 Psychological Measurement

PSY 338 Psychology of Abnormal Behavior

PSY 340 Research Design and Analysis

PSY 354 History and Systems of Psychology

PSY 355 Child Psychology

PSY 360 Industrial and Organizational Psychology

PSY 401 Experimental Psychology Lecture and Lab

PSY 411 Counseling Psychology I

PSY 412 Counseling Psychology II

PSY 423 Advanced Psychology Seminar

____

Minor Total 18

Sociology Minor (SOCM)

A minor in sociology should assist any student, regardless of the major program, to a better understanding of social interaction within group settings. Because most facets of American society involve frequent interaction of persons within groups, the sociology minor would seem a logical choice to complement any major program offered by Oral Roberts University. Many graduate programs in sociology do not specify an undergraduate major as a requirement for admission; therefore, a minor in sociology with a proper selection of courses should prepare the aspiring professional sociologist for admission to most graduate programs.

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3

Choice of five of the following courses: 15

SOC 201 Marriage and the Family

SOC 212 Social Psychology

SOC 300 Group Dynamics

SOC 302 Research Methods

SOC 308 Cultural Anthropology

SOC 323 Child and Family in the Social Context

SOC 329 Social Deviancy/Social Control

SOC 420 Minority Group Relations

____

Minor Total 18

Social Justice Minor (SJM)

Social justice is a cornerstone value for the practice of social work. The minor in social justice (1) provides students with the opportunity to further examine social work as a major course of study; and (2) offers students from other disciplines a minor that provides an indepth examination of social justice and its socio-economic, cultural, political, and spiritual ramifications.

Study the issues of poverty, racism, discrimination, and oppression, especially those people groups most vulnerable, can lead to involvement in the struggle for social justice.

SWK 202 Introduction to Social Work 3

SWK 303 Social Welfare Policy 3

SWK 310 Human Behavior 3

in the Social Environment II

SWK 420 Minority Group Relations 3

SWK 450 Directed Study* 3

Choice of one of the following three courses: 3

SOC 308 Cultural Anthropology

SOC 329 Social Deviancy/Social Control

SWK 381 Child Welfare

____

Minor Total 18

*A service project.

  

Departmental Courses

Descriptions of the courses listed below are in the section titled Course Descriptions at the end of this catalog. Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order by the prefix. Courses offered are listed as “F” for the “fall,” “S” for the “spring,” and courses with no designation have variable schedules. The department has more information.
Psychology

PSY 201 Principles of Psychology F, S

PSY 212 Social Psychology F, S

PSY 250 Behavior Management

PSY 301 Developmental Psychology F, S

PSY 305 Physiological Psychology S

PSY 321 Psychology of Personality Development F, S

PSY 322 Psychology of Learning and Motivation F

PSY 323 Psychological Measurement S

PSY 324 Cognitive Psychology

PSY 338 Psychology of Abnormal Behavior F, S

PSY 340 Research Design and Analysis F

PSY 354 History and Systems of Psychology F, S

PSY 355 Child Psychology F, S

PSY 360 Industrial & Organizational Psychology S

PSY 401 Experimental Psychology Lecture and Lab S

PSY 411 Counseling Psychology I F

PSY 412 Counseling Psychology II S

PSY 423 Advanced Psychology Seminar F, S

PSY 450 Directed Study F, S

PSY 451 Senior Internship F, S

PSY 461 Honors Research F, S

PSY 499 Senior Paper F

PSY 999 Elective

Sociology

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology F, S

SOC 201 Marriage and the Family F, S

SOC 212 Social Psychology F, S

SOC 300 Group Dynamics S

SOC 302 Research Methods F

SOC 308 Cultural Anthropology S

SOC 323 Child and Family in the Social Context F

SOC 329 Social Deviancy and Social Control F

SOC 420 Minority Group Relations S

SOC 440 Social Theory

SOC 450 Directed Study F, S

SOC 461 Honors Research F, S

SOC 499 Senior Paper

SOC 999 Elective

Social Work

SWK 202 Introduction to Social Work F, S

SWK 302 Research Methods F

SWK 303 Social Welfare Policy S

SWK 309 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I F

SWK 310 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II S

SWK 331 Social Work Practice I F

SWK 332 Social Work Practice II F

SWK 333 Social Work Practice III S

SWK 341 Junior Practicum I F

SWK 342 Junior Practicum II S

SWK 380 Aging Processes

SWK 381 Child Welfare S

SWK 382 Social Services in Health Care

SWK 383 Family Dynamics

SWK 404 Social Work Practice IV F

SWK 405 Senior Seminar S

SWK 420 Minority Group Relations S

SWK 443 Senior Practicum I F, S

SWK 444 Senior Practicum II F, S

SWK 450 Directed Study F, S

SWK 461 Honors Research F, S

SWK 499 Senior Research Paper F, S

SWK 999 Elective

 

Biology and Chemistry Department

Joel Gaikwad, Ph.D., Chair

 

MISSION STATEMENT:

The Biology and Chemistry Department educates students in a professional know-ledge base of biological and chemical facts, concepts, trends, and laboratory skills to be equipped--aided and inspired by the power of the Holy Spirit--to scientifically investigate and solve problems in medicine, biochemistry, education, the environment, forensics, toxicology, energy, agriculture, and other fields. The department challenges students to integrate their Christian faith with their science by encouraging them (1) to appreciate the glory and majesty of Christ visible throughout creation; (2) to engage in their roles as stewards of God's creation; (3) to accurately discern between science, religion, and pseudoscience; (4) to address ethical dilemmas in science-based problems; and (5) to exhibit Christ-like compassion, using their scientific knowledge to help others suffering from disease, inadequate health care, limited food availability, and contaminated water supplies.

 

Overview

The vision of the Biology and Chemistry Department is to provide a curriculum and educational environment that encourages professional competence, coupled with Christian faith and practice, to help enable students to hear God's voice and to take His healing power into the world. Students must learn to understand and live in harmony with creation in order to maintain a sustainable quality of life acceptable now and in the future. Concerns about the continued misuse of the environment are being addressed more strongly than ever, and students must learn to understand, interact with, and respond positively to those concerns.

 

Departmental Outcomes

A graduate from the Biology and Chemistry Department should be able to do the following:

  • Use scientific knowledge and the power of the Holy Spirit to make professional decisions consistent with Biblical principles.
  • Analyze problems using a working knowledge of scientific concepts to offer beneficial solutions.
  • Exhibit competency in researching literature and use of information to effectively analyze and interpret data.
  • Write and speak effectively using the language, concepts, and models of science including evidence of God within the natural realm.
  • Relate to the university and the world through the use of professional competencies to provide service and healing.

 

Degree Programs

The Biology and Chemistry Department offers courses of study leading to the bachelor of science degree with majors in biology, chemistry, biomedical chemistry, environmental sustainability, medical molecular biology, medical technology, and science education (middle and high school). The biology, biomedical chemistry, environmental sustainability, medical molecular biology, medical technology, and chemistry programs are designed to meet the needs of students who desire to (1) pursue graduate work, (2) train for work in industry and government, or (3) prepare for professional training in the health sciences.
Biology (B.S.)

The biology major offers an optional concentration in health professions.

Chemistry (B.S.)

The chemistry major is designed to provide (1) a working knowledge of chemical concepts; (2) a rigorous, medically oriented program; (3) state-of-the-art training for graduate school or immediate employment; (4) opportunity to broaden a student’s skill by learning the concepts of chemistry; and (5) opportunities to work in chemical companies and industrial research.

Biomedical Chemistry (B.S.)

The biomedical chemistry major offers optional concentrations in premedicine and research. Students selecting to major in biomedical chemistry must minor in biology. The biomedical chemistry program with a research concentration is specifically designed to prepare students to pursue professional training in M.D.-Ph.D. programs.

Global Environmental Sustainability (B.S.)

The bachelor of science degree with a major in global environmental sustainability is designed to allow students to combine training in the fundamentals of environmental science with instruction to other pertinent fields of study. Stewardship of the environment and management of natural resources are seen as essential steps to providing for the needs of future generations. Such endeavors involve a wide range of professional disciplines, so it is recommended that in this degree, students also pursue a minor in general or nonprofit business, social justice, chemistry, or missions; however, other options are available. This degree prepares students to seek graduate degrees in related specialties.

Medical Molecular Biology (B.S.)

Students completing this program will obtain a B.S. in Medical Molecular Biology  and minor in biochemistry. The major has a challenging curriculum that includes general biology, medical molecular biology, biochemistry, and psychology which is primarily designed to equip students to be competitive applicants ass they pursue post-baccalaureate degree in medicine (M.D./D.O.). Given the emphasis on human health, the major could also benefit students planning to enter other professional schools such as pharmacy, dental, physician assistant, optometry and graduate studies.

Medical Technology (B.S.)

The medical technology major provides students an opportunity to study basic sciences at ORU for three years and then spend one year training with professionals in the St. Francis Hospital School of Medical Technology. Along with the required minor in biochemistry, the medical technology major prepares students to pursue professional careers in medical technology.

Science Education with biology emphasis (B.S.)

Students seeking licensure to teach at the secondary levels have two options: (1) completion of the science education major, which leads to standard certification or (2) completion of any other major in the Biology and Chemistry Department or Engineering, Computer Science, Physics, and Mathematics Department, which can lead to alternative certification. As alternative certification is intended for those seeking career changes, requirements vary widely from state to state, and laws governing these programs can change frequently. Therefore, students interested in pursuing alternative certification need to meet with the ORU College of Education’s certification officer to ensure they are well informed prior to choosing this option. Students pursuing alternative certification need to check with the State Department of Education from any state in which they plan to teach in order to ensure they meet specific requirements for that state’s alternative certification.

 

 

Minors

Minors are offered in biology, biochemistry, chemistry, and environmental studies.

Preprofessional Health Programs

Prehealth professional students, including premedicine, predentistry, and others, should consider their God-given gifts and abilities in selecting one of several recognized majors, such as biology, chemistry, biomedical engineering, psychology, or health and exercise science as a prehealth professional route.

Prehealth professional programs provide a balanced liberal arts education with strengths in the sciences and the humanities. Any major can be adapted to a prehealth professional program by including the following courses: (1) MAT 106 or 201, (2) BIO 111 and 112 lecture and lab, (3) CHE 111 and 112 lecture and lab, (4) CHE 211 and 212 lecture and lab, and (5) PHY 101 and 102 lecture and lab or PHY 111 and 112 lecture and lab. These courses are required by most health professional schools, including medical, dental, and pharmacy schools, and assist in preparing students to take the MCAT, DAT, or PCAT exams.

Admission to medical, dental, pharmacy, and other health professional schools in the United States is very selective. Students with excellent grades, high admission test scores, knowledge of their health profession, and health care experience are highly favored for admission. Proper advisement is necessary to adequately prepare students for admission to professional schools, so ORU offers advisement to prepare students for various medical fields. A prehealth professional advisor can provide a comprehensive advisement program that includes academic advisement, health career literature, guest speakers, information on admissions tests, medical and dental school application procedures, and a library of special reference publications. Students seeking to attend these professional schools need to work with faculty members to choose courses appropriate for their plans.

All prehealth professional programs at ORU start with a general set of courses based on the typical admission requirements of various health professional schools. However, since some of these schools have unique preparatory requirements, students are advised to obtain a catalog from each school to which they plan to apply in order to determine the exact requirements. This will assist students and their prehealth professional advisors to tailor the prehealth professional program directly to address specific applications.

Premedicine

Both the biology major and the biomedical chemistry major offer a premedicine concentration. However, students interested in the premedical program at ORU can also major in chemistry, psychology, or any field of their choosing. Electives should be chosen in consultation with the advisor.

Predentistry

Students interested in preparing for dental school should major in biology, biomedical chemistry, chemistry, psychology, health exercise science, or another major with electives chosen to fulfill the unique requirements of the desired schools of dentistry.

A two-year recommended program is designed to meet the common prerequisites for most professional schools in dental hygiene. Advice is available from the department.

Prepharmacy

The minimum prerequisites for admission to a pharmacy college can usually be completed in three years. However, most of the successful prepharmacy applicants in recent years have had four years or more of preparatory training. While the prepharmacy program follows a similar schedule to both premedicine and predentistry (such as majoring in chemistry or biochemistry), there are significant differences. Often various schools of pharmacy have different prerequisite course requirements. It is particularly important for students following the prepharmacy program to work closely with prehealth professional advisors to adjust their programs.

Preveterinary

The minimum prerequisites for admission to a college of veterinary medicine can usually be completed in three years. However, most of the successful preveterinary applicants in recent years have had four years or more of preparatory training. Therefore, the Biology and Chemistry Department recommends preveterinary students complete a four-year degree program with a major in biology or biomedical chemistry. It is particularly important for students following the preveterinary program to work closely with ORU faculty serving as prehealth professional advisors to adjust their programs.

 

Other Health Professions

The Biology and Chemistry Department offers assistance in degree planning for students planning to enter schools of occupational therapy, physical therapy, optometry, medical technology, or physician assistant. Most of these programs now require students to have an undergraduate degree before entering the program. However, some well-qualified students who have taken all the prerequisites may enter some programs after the third year of undergraduate study. Most schools require a general education program that includes courses in biology, chemistry, human anatomy, and human physiology. Unlike medical schools, requirements and prerequisites for allied health careers vary among programs and schools. Anyone planning a career in one of these fields should consult with a prehealth professional advisor in the Biology and Chemistry Department to develop a specific undergraduate curriculum to successfully meet their goals.

Health Profession Articulation Agreements

These articulation agreements between Oral Roberts University and other institutions of higher education enable students to begin coursework at ORU and later transfer to another university in order to complete their undergraduate and graduate degrees in medical fields.

Medicine

Oral Roberts University has established an agreement with the Oklahoma State University, Center for Health Sciences that provides ORU students with a special opportunity to be admitted into their Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine program. This “early assurance” programgrants conditional admission to their medical school program provided ORU students perform well academically in core science courses, earn a high overall GPA and score at about the national level of the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). Once these criteria have been met, the applicant will then be accepted upon satisfactory evaluations of the applicant’s file and the interview process.

Physical Therapy

ORU has two articulation agreements in physical therapy. The first agreement is with University of Oklahoma-Tulsa. The agreement allows for students with three years of study at ORU to apply for admission to the Ph.D. program in physical therapy. Further information is available in the ORU Health, Physical Education, and Recreation Department.

The second agreement is with Southwest Baptist University (SBU). A student who completes a baccalaureate degree in any major at ORU and the requirements for admission to the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program at Southwest Baptist University as listed here will automatically receive preference and be eligible for the admission process.

  • Have a minimum 2.75 overall GPA.
  • Complete the graduate record exam.
  • Complete and return physical therapy packet by June 15th of year prior to enrollment.
  • Document 40 hours experience/observation in physical therapy.
  • Meet admissions eligibility requirements in SBU catalog (if international student).
  • Demonstrate computer literacy.
  • Complete the following prerequisite courses with a minimum of a "C" and 3.0 prerequisite GPA. (Prerequisites should not be taken pass/fail.): CHE 111 and 112, PHY 101 and 102, BIO 111, PHS 223 and 224, MAT 232, and two psychology courses except PSY 232.
Nutritional Sciences

ORU has an articulation agreement with the University of Oklahoma-Tulsa (OU-Tulsa) for earning a Bachelor of Science degree in nutritional sciences. This program provides an opportunity for area students to complete a bachelor's degree in nutritional sciences in Tulsa. The first 60 hours, which includes general education and science courses, are taken at ORU and the remainder of the degree at OU-Tulsa. Information is available in the ORU Biology and Chemistry Department and at OU-Tulsa.

Communication Sciences and Disorders

ORU has an articulation agreement with the University of Oklahoma-Tulsa (OU-Tulsa) for earning a Bachelor of Science degree in communication sciences and disorders. This program provides an opportunity for area students to complete a bachelor's degree in communication sciences and disorders in Tulsa. The first 60 hours, which includes general education and science courses, are taken at ORU and the remainder of the degree at OU-Tulsa. Information is available in the ORU Office of PreHealth Professional Advisement and at OU-Tulsa.

 

Radiologic Technology

ORU has an articulation agreement with the University of Oklahoma-Tulsa (OU-Tulsa) for earning a Bachelor of Science degree in radiologic technology. This program provides an opportunity for area students to complete a bachelor's degree in radiologic technology in Tulsa. The first 60 hours, which includes general education and science courses, are taken at ORU and the remainder of the degree at OU-Tulsa. Information is available in the ORU Biology and Chemistry Department and at OU-Tulsa.

   

 

Special Opportunities

The Biology and Chemistry Department has arranged opportunities for student internships with the Oklahoma Aquarium in Tulsa and with local institutions as part of the Tulsa Area Bioscience Education and Research Consortium (TABERC). The department also works with students in developing or applying for internships that are tailored to their interests.

Students desiring a hands-on environmental learning experience have the opportunity to attend Au Sable Institute in northern Michigan to complete some course requirements that are normally met at ORU. Courses are designed to prepare students for work or further study in environmental endeavors. Any ORU student who meets the course prerequisites may take these courses, but the opportunity is of particular value to biology majors with an environmental concentration. The Michigan campus is surrounded by many lakes, rivers, and other natural areas. Satellite campuses are located in Washington state, Florida, and India. Scholarships are available.

 

Clubs and Organizations

Tri-Beta Honor Society assists students interested in biological topics an opportunity to focus on scientific research. There are two national conventions each year and the publication of BIOS, a scholarly journal that includes student research. The Mu Kappa chapter at ORU participates in monthly meetings and community service projects.

The ORU student affiliate chapter of the American Chemical Society (ACS) meets regularly to focus scholarly attention on relevant issues in chemistry. Student affiliates have the opportunity to present research during local, statewide, regional, or national meetings of ACS.

Alpha Epsilon Delta National Society provides additional opportunities for professional development for all pre-health profession majors with scholarly achievement. These opportunities increase student awareness of issues important to the process of application and acceptance into advanced health professional programs. Opportunities include attendance in medical seminars, cadaver dissection, job shadowing, mission experiences, and volunteer opportunities at the Good Samaritan Health Clinic.

The Minority Association of Premedical Students (MAPS) is a new, nationally-recognized club for minorities interested in pursuing a career in medicine or other health-related professions.

Iota Sigma Pi is a national honors society of women in chemistry.

 

Awards and Scholarships

In recognition of scholarship, leadership, and ORU lifestyle commitment, the Biology and Chemistry Department annually honors outstanding students by presenting the following awards.

Outstanding Biology Senior Award. This award recognizes the outstanding graduating senior in biology.

Outstanding Chemistry Student Award. This awards the outstanding graduating senior in chemistry.

Outstanding Biology and Chemistry Senior Papers. These awards recognize outstanding senior research projects from each major in the Biology and Chemistry Department.

James Wilkes Pugh Memorial Scholarship. This fund is designated for students majoring in the natural sciences, primarily for those who live in the Ozark regions of Missouri, Arkansas, and Oklahoma, but students from other regions may apply.

Muccio Endowed Scholarship Fund. This fund is designed for outstanding premedical students who demonstrate financial need and have a strong desire to serve in medical missions.

Outstanding Organic Chemistry Student Award. This recognizes the student with the highest combined GPA in Organic I and II lectures.

Chemical Rubber Company (CRC) Handbook Award. This recognizes the chemistry student with the highest combined GPA in General Chemistry I and II lectures.

 

Biology Major (BIO) Bachelor of Science
General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101)

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Physics 8

(101/101L and 102/102L or 111/111L and 112/112L)

Mathematics (MAT 332) 3

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, SOC 201, FIN 244)

Healthand Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 55.5

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses with asterisks.

Major

BIO 111 Introductory Biology I (lecture and lab) 4

BIO 112 Introductory Biology II (lecture and lab) 4

BIO 209 Methods in Biotechnology 1

BIO 312 Human Ecology (lecture and lab)^ 4

BIO 372 Introduction to Biological Research 1

BIO 451 Biology Seminar 1

BIO 456 Biomedical Ethics 3

BIO 499 Research and Senior Paper 3

Choice of four of the following courses:** 16

BIO 310 Microbiology (lecture and lab)

BIO 311 Medical Genetics (lecture and lab)

BIO 411 Molecular Cell Biology (lecture and lab)

BIO 421 General and Comparative Physiology (lecture and lab)

BIO 431 Developmental Biology (lecture and lab)

BIO 454 Special Topics (must be a lecture and lab; maximum one course)

BIO 457 Principles of Immunology (lecture and lab)

Other field biology options

BIO 458 Marine Ecology (lecture and lab)

AUS 302 Limnology*

AUS 303 Ecological Agriculture*

AUS 304 Global Development and

Ecological Sustainability*

AUS 311 Field Botany*

AUS 312 Insect Biology and Ecology*

AUS 322 Aquatic Biology*

AUS 359 Marine Mammals*

AUS 377 Marine Invertebrates*

AUS 471 Conservation Biology*

AUS 482 Restoration Ecology*

____

Major Total 37

^May be replaced by a field biology course.

*Courses with an AUS prefix are offered at the Au Sable Institute in Michigan and other off-campus locations.

**Students choosing an environmental concentration must choose from BIO 312 or BIO 458 and one of the AUS courses offered only at the Au Sable Institute.

Cognate

CHE 111 General Chemistry I (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 112 General Chemistry II (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 211 Organic Chemistry I (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 212 Organic Chemistry II (lecture and lab) 4

Choice of one of the following courses: 3-4

MAT 106 Trigonometry (3 hrs.)

MAT 201 Calculus I (4 hrs.)

____

Cognate Total 19-20

Minor and/or Electives* 16-17

____

Degree Total 128.5

*Recommended electives include MAT 202 (pre-requisite of MAT 201); CHE 300, 400, 454, 457, PHS 223, 224, BIO 200, and any upper-division biology course.

Students may use their elective hours for a concentration in health professions (HPC). Students desiring to prepare for health professions such as optometry, medical technology, physician assistant, pharmacy, physical therapy, or occupational therapy must select the following courses in place of eight hours of electives leaving five hours of electives to complete.

PHP 100 Pre-Health Seminar 1

BIO 200 Human Cadaver Dissection 1

BIO 259 Medical Terminology 2

PHS 223 Human Anatomy (lecture and lab) 4

PHS 224 Human Physiology (lecture and lab) 4

____

Concentration Total 12

Alternatively, students may choose to use their elective hours to complete a biochemistry or chemistry minor (20 hours). One or two years of foreign language should be included by students who plan to pursue an advanced degree in biology.

 

global Environmental Sustainability Major (geS) Bachelor of Science

General Education

Introduction toe Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101)

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Lab Science (CHE 101 or CHE 111 lecture and lab) 4

Lab Science (BIO 101, BIO 105 or BIO 111 lecture and lab) 4

Mathematics (MAT 105, 201, or 232) 3-4

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Social Science Elective (BUS 201) 3

Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 4.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 55.5

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

Major

BIO 312 Human Ecology (lecture and lab) 4

BIO 456 Biomedical Ethics 3

EVR 201 Global Development and Sustainability 3

EVR 250 Environmental Science I (lecture and lab) 4

EVR 251 Environmental Science II (lecture and lab) 4

EVR 360 Readings in Environmental Science 1

EVR 380 Environmental Sustainability Internship 3

EVR 390 Environmental Research 1

EVR 451 Environmental Seminar 1

EVR 499 Senior Paper 3

Choice of any 100-200 level science lecture and lab) 4

(BIO 11, BIO 112, BIO 212, CHE 111, CHE 112, PHS 223 or PHS 224)

Choice of two of the following courses (with corresponding lab) 8

BIO 104 Tropical Biology

BIO 410 Medical Parsitology

BIO 454/AUS 454 Conservation Biology* 

AUS 301 Land Resources*

AUS 302 Lake Ecology and Management*

AUS 303 Ecological Agriculture*

AUS 310 Environmental Law*

AUS 318 Marine Biology*

AUS 332 Environmental Chemistry*

AUS 343 Tropical Agriculture*

AUS 355 Watershed Stewardship*

AUS 482 Restoration Ecology* 

____

Major Total 39

*AUS courses offered in the summer at the Au Sable Institute of Environmental Studies in Mancelona,  Michigan.

Cognate

Choose one course from each of the following subject areas 12

 BUS, GOV, IS or SWK

____

Cognate Total 12

Minor**  and/or Electives*** 22

____

Degree Total 128.5

**It is recommended (but not required) that students choose a minor from the following minors: nonprofit business, general business, chemistry, missions, or social justice, or they may choose to complete the 18 credit hour program at H.E.A.R.T. Institute at Warner University in lieu of a minor. Hunger Education and Resources Training (H.E.A.R.T.) is an interdenominational center that trains students to serve in Third World locations. More information is available in the section titled “Non-traditional Coursework” earlier in this catalog.

***Recommended electives include BUS 202, MGT 421, and MGT 465.

   

medical molecular biology (mmb) Bachelor of Science

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 333, 250, 255, 260, 270, 999* COMP 101^)

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Physics 8 (101/101L and 102/102L or 111/111L and 112/112L)

Mathematics (MAT 106 or 201) 3-4

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Social Science Elective (PSY 201) 3

Health and Physical Education 4.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 55.5

*May be granted credit more than once for HUM 999.

^Must be transferred in or completed as a pre-requisite to COMP 102 to receive humanities credit.

Major

BIO 111 Introductory Biology I (lecture and lab) 4

BIO 112 Introductory Biology II (lecture and lab) 4

BIO 209 Methods in Biotechnology 1

BIO 310 Microbiology (lecture and lab) 4

BIO 372 Introduction to Biological Research 1

BIO 451 Biology Seminar 1

BIO 456 Biomedical Ethics 3

BIO 499 Research and Senior Paper 3

PHP 100 Prehealth Seminar 1

Choice of four of the following courses:** 16

BIO 311 Medical Genetics (lecture and lab)

BIO 312 Human Ecology (lecture and lab)

BIO 410 Medical Parasitology (lecture and lab)

BIO 411 Molecular Cell Biology (lecture and lab)

BIO 431 Developmental Biology (lecture and lab)

BIO 454 Special Topics (must be a lecture and lab; maximum one course)

BIO 457 Principles of Immunology (lecture and lab)

____

Major Total 38

Cognate

MAT 232 Elementary Statistics 3

PSY 301 Developmental Psychology 3

PSY 305 Physiological Psychology 3

PSY 338 Psychology of Abnormal Psychology 3

PSY _____ Psychology Elective 3

____

Cognate Total 15

Biomedical Chemistry Minor** 20

____

Degree Total 128.5

**A biochemistry minor is required. See requirements later in this section of the catalog.

  

Science Education Major (SCEB) with a biology emphasis and Secondary School Teaching Licensure Bachelor of Science

Students may earn licensure in a second subject/content area. The Oklahoma Commission for Teacher Preparation requires the OSAT/OPTE test(s) be passed in order to obtain a license in an additional subject/content area. Students interested in completing coursework toward additional licensing should consult the subject area advisor.
General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101)

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science (PSC 201 and CHE 101 Honors) 8

Mathematics (MAT 106 or 201) 3-4

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Foreign Language Proficiency (PRFL 001) 0      (exam or 102 level of a foreign language class)

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, SOC 201, SOC 323, FIN 244)

Health and Physical Education 4.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, Basic First Aid/CPR, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 55.5

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

Major

BIO 111 Introduction to Biology (lecture and lab) 4

BIO 112 Introductory Biology II (lecture and lab) 4

BIO 209 Methods in Biotechnology 1

BIO 312 Human Ecology (lecture and lab) 4

BIO 372 Introduction to Biological Research 1

BIO 499 Individual Research and Senior Paper 3

CHE 111 General Chemistry I (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 112 General Chemistry II (lecture and lab) 4

HONR 102 Philosophy of Science 3

PHS 223 Human Anatomy (lecture and lab) 4

PHS 224 Human Physiology I (lecture and lab) 4

PHY 101 General Physics I (lecture and lab) 4

BIO Electives (upper division) 8

____

Major Total 48

Professional Education

PED 100 Education Seminar (every semester) 0

PED 121 Field Based Experience/Practicum 1 (Secondary)

PED 203 Foundations and Methods of Education 3

PED 222 School Health Care 1

PED 305 Pedagogy I 4

PED 306 Pedagogy II 4

PED 361 Professional Education Seminar/ Portfolio 0

PED 485 Student Teaching: 7-9 5

PED 495 Student Teaching: 10-12 5

BIO 429 Secondary Methods: Science 1

BIO 429 Secondary Methods: Science 1

BIO 429 Secondary Methods: Science 1

____

Professional Education Total 26

____

Degree Total 129.5

  

Biomedical Chemistry Major (BMCH) Bachelor of Science

The degree program in biomedical chemistry, which has a required minor in biology, is designed to provide a combination of studies in the biological sciences and chemistry for those students who plan to enter a professional school of medicine, dentistry, pharmaceutical, or veterinary medicine; plan to pursue a career in clinical or medicinal chemistry; or plan to work in a biological or medical industry.
General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the 12 following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101)

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Chemistry (CHE 111 and 112 lecture and lab) 8

Mathematics (MAT 201) 4

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Social Sciences Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244)

Health and Physical Education 4.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 56.5

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

Major

CHE 211 Organic Chemistry I (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 212 Organic Chemistry II (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 300 Quantitative Analysis (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 303 Physical Chemistry I (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 400 Chemical Instrumentation 4 (lecture and lab)

CHE 449 Chemistry Research 1

CHE 452 Seminar 1

CHE 499 Individual Research and Senior Paper 3

Choice of two of the following courses: 6

CHE 455 Oncological Chemistry 

CHE 459 Biochemistry Lecture 

CHE 473 Medicinal Chemistry 

Choice of one of the following courses: 3

CHE 304 Physical Chemistry II 

CHE 456 Inorganic Chemistry

CHE 469 Biochemistry II 

____

Major Total 34

Cognate

BIO 200 Human Cadaver Dissection 1

MAT 202 Calculus II 4

PHP 100 Prehealth Seminar 1

PHY 101/102 General Physics I and II 8

____

Cognate Total 14

Minor* 21

Choice of one of the following electives: 3

PSY 212 Social Psychology

PSY 301 Developmental Psychology

PSY 305 Physiological Psychology

PSY 338 Psychology of Abnormal Behavior

____

Degree Total 128.5

*See requirements for the required minor in biology later in this section of the catalog.

 

Chemistry Major (CHE) Bachelor of Science

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101)

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Chemistry (CHE 111 and 112 lecture and lab) 8

Mathematics (MAT 201) 4

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244)

Health and Physical Education 4.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 56.5

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

Major

CHE 211 Organic Chemistry I (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 212 Organic Chemistry II (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 300 Quantitative Analysis (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 303 Physical Chemistry I (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 304 Physical Chemistry II Lecture 3

CHE 400 Chemical Instrumentation 4 (lecture and lab)

CHE 449 Chemistry Research 1

CHE 452 Seminar 1

CHE 456 Inorganic Chemistry 3

CHE 499 Individual Research and Senior Paper 3

Choice of two of the following courses: 6

CHE 455 Oncological Chemistry (3 hrs.)

CHE 459 Biochemistry Lecture (3 hrs.)

CHE 473 Medicinal Chemistry (3 hrs.)

____

Major Total 37

Cognate

MAT 202 Calculus II 4

MAT 211 Differential Equations 3

CSC 111 Introduction to Computing 3

Choice of one of the following: 8

PHY 101/102 General Physics I and II (lecture and lab) or PHY 111/112 Physics I and II (lecture and lab)

____

Cognate Total 18

Electives Total 17

____

Degree Total 128.5

  

Medical Technology Major (MET) Bachelor of Science

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Humanities12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101)

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Biology (BIO 111 and 112 lecture and lab) 8

Mathematics (MAT 106) 3

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244)

Health and Physical Education 3.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 54.5

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

Major

CLS 4117 Clinical Microbiology 7

CLS 4125 Clinical Chemistry I 5

CLS 4236 Clinical Hematology 6

CLS 4246 Clinical Immunology/ Immunohematology 6

CLS 4325 Clinical Chemistry II 5

CLS 4351 Topics in Medical Terminology 1

____

Major Total 30

Cognate

BIO 310 Microbiology with Laboratory 4

BIO 311 Medical Genetics with Laboratory 4

BIO 457 Immunology with Laboratory 4

CHE 300 Quantitative Analysis with Laboratory 4

____

Cognate Total 16

Minor* 20

Electives Total** 8

____

Degree Total 128.5

*See requirements for the required minor in biochemistry later in this section of the catalog.

**Recommended electives include PHS 224, PHP 100 and MAT 332.

 

minors
Chemistry Minor (CHEM)

This program is designed for students majoring in another discipline who desire a minor in chemistry.

CHE 111 General Chemistry I (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 112 General Chemistry II (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 211 Organic Chemistry I (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 212 Organic Chemistry II (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 300 Quantitative Analysis (lecture and lab) 4

____

Minor Total 20

Biochemistry Minor (BCM)

This program is designed for students majoring in another discipline who desire a minor in biomedical chemistry.

CHE 111 General Chemistry I (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 112 General Chemistry II (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 211 Organic Chemistry I (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 212 Organic Chemistry II (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 459 Biochemistry (lecture and lab) 4

____

Minor Total 20

Biology Minor (BILM)

BIO 209 Methods in Biotechnology 1

BIO 111 Introductory Biology I (lecture and lab) 4

BIO 112 Introductory Biology II (lecture and lab) 4

Choice of one of the following field courses: 4

BIO 312 Human Ecology (lecture and lab)

BIO 458 Marine Biology (lecture and lab)

BIO Biology field course (lecture and lab)

AUS Au Sable field course (lecture and lab)

Choice of two of the following courses: 8

BIO 310 Microbiology (lecture and lab)**

BIO 311 Medical Genetics (lecture and lab)**

BIO 411 Molecular Cell Biology (lecture and lab)**

BIO 421 General and Comparative Physiology (lecture and lab)**

BIO 431 Developmental Biology (lecture and lab)**

BIO 454 Special Topics (lecture and lab)**

BIO 457 Principles of Immunology (lecture and lab)**

BIO Biology elective (300-level or above)

____

Minor Total 21

**Students majoring in biomedical chemistry must choose from courses marked with asterisks.

Environmental Studies Minor (ENVM)

The stewardship of the environment is of interest to all students regardless of their majors. To assist our community in making appropriate choices on environmental issues, we offer a minor in environmental studies. Students in any major may opt for this minor; however, some courses have prerequisites.

The curriculum for the minor combines in-class courses and field courses. Students should consult the advisor in the Biology and Chemistry Department so that there will be an appropriate combination of courses. Some courses are available through Au Sable Institute in northern Michigan and may be taken in summer terms.

BIO 312 Human Ecology (lecture and lab) 4

EVR 250 Environmental Science (lecture and lab) 4

EVR 450 Current Global Issues Seminar 3

Choice of one of the following sequences: 4

CHE 101 Principles of Chemistry (lecture and lab)

CHE 111 General Chemistry I (lecture and lab)

Choice of one course from the following: 4

BIO 458 Marine Ecology (lecture and lab)

CHE 400 Chemical Instrumentation (lecture and lab)

*AUS 216 Field Geology*

*AUS 302 Limnology*

*AUS 311 Field Botany*

*AUS 471 Conservation Biology*

*AUS 482 Restoration Ecology*

____

Minor Total 19

*Courses with an AUS prefix are offered only at the Au Sable Institute in Michigan.

Note: Of the 19 hours, eight must be in field studies. EVR 250 lecture and lab combination may be taken as honors lab science course to meet 4 hours of general education requirements, if she works on gettin bai

  

Departmental Courses

Descriptions of the courses listed below are in the section titled Course Descriptions at the end of this catalog. Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order by the prefix.
Biology

BIO 101 Principles of Biology Lecture

BIO 101L Principles of Biology Laboratory

BIO 104 Tropical Biology

BIO 105 Introductory Biology and Chemistry

BIO 111 Introductory Biology I Lecture

BIO 111L Introductory Biology I Laboratory

BIO 112 Introductory Biology II Lecture

BIO 112L Introductory Biology II Laboratory

BIO 200 Human Cadaver Dissection

BIO 209 Methods in Biotechnology

BIO 212 Principles of Microbiology Lecture

BIO 212L Principles of Microbiology Laboratory

BIO 259 Medical Terminology

BIO 310 Microbiology Lecture

BIO 310L Microbiology Laboratory

BIO 311 Medical Genetics Lecture

BIO 311L Medical Genetics Laboratory

BIO 312 Human Ecology Lecture

BIO 312L Human Ecology Lab

BIO 372 Introduction to Biological Research

BIO 410 Medical Parasitology Lecture

BIO 410L Medical Parasitology Lab

BIO 411 Molecular Cell Biology Lecture

BIO 411L Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory

BIO 421 General and Comparative Physiology Lecture

BIO 421L General and Comparative Physiology Laboratory

BIO 429 Secondary Methods: Science

BIO 431 Developmental Biology Lecture

BIO 431L Developmental Biology Laboratory

BIO 451 Biology Seminar

BIO 454 Special Topics

BIO 456 Biomedical Ethics

BIO 457 Principles of Immunology Lecture

BIO 457L Principles of Immunology Laboratory

BIO 458 Marine Ecology Lecture

BIO 458L Marine Ecology Laboratory

BIO 499 Individual Research and Senior Paper

BIO 999 Elective



PreHealth Professions

PHP 100 Prehealth Seminar

PHP 400 Medical Seminar

PHP 999 Elective

Physiology

PHS 223 Human Anatomy Lecture

PHS 223L Human Anatomy Laboratory

PHS 224 Human Physiology Lecture

PHS 224L Human Physiology Laboratory

PHS 999 Elective

Chemistry

CHE 101 Principles of Chemistry Lecture

CHE 101L Principles of Chemistry Laboratory

CHE 105 Introductory Biology and Chemistry

CHE 111 General Chemistry I Lecture

CHE 111L General Chemistry I Laboratory

CHE 112 General Chemistry II Lecture

CHE 112L General Chemistry II Laboratory

CHE 211 Organic Chemistry I Lecture

CHE 211L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

CHE 212 Organic Chemistry II Lecture

CHE 212L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

CHE 300 Quantitative Analysis Lecture

CHE 300L Quantitative Analysis Laboratory

CHE 303 Physical Chemistry I Lecture

CHE 303L Physical Chemistry I Laboratory

CHE 304 Physical Chemistry II

CHE 400 Chemical Instrumentation Lecture

CHE 400L Chemical Instrumentation Laboratory

CHE 449 Chemistry Research

CHE 452 Seminar

CHE 455 Oncological Chemistry

CHE 456 Inorganic Chemistry

CHE 458 Chemistry Internship

CHE 459 Biochemistry Lecture

CHE 459L Biochemistry Laboratory

CHE 469 Biochemistry II Lecture

CHE 471 Structure and Bonding

CHE 473 Medicinal Chemistry

CHE 474 Environmental Analysis

CHE 499 Individual Research and Senior Paper

CHE 999 Elective

Environmental Science

EVR 201 Global Development and Sustainability

EVR 250 Environmental Science I Lecture

EVR 250L Environmental Science I Lab

EVR 251 Environmental Science II Lecture

EVR 251L Environmental Science II Lab

EVR 360 Readings in Environmental Science

EVR 380 Environmental Sustainability Internship

EVR 390 Environmental Research

EVR 451 Environmental Seminar

EVR 499 Senior Paper

EVR 999 Elective

  

Computing and Mathematics Department

Andrew SID Lang, Ph.D., Chair

 

MISSION STATEMENT:

The Computing and Mathematics Department seeks to promote quantitative literacy, analytical reasoning, and technological competence. Students learn how to apply mathematical and computer knowledge to the solution of real world problems within the context of a Christian worldview.

The Computing and Mathematics Department offers majors and minors in both computer information technology and mathematics as well as majors in mathematics preactuary, mathematical physics, mathematical finance, and mathematics education. A concentration is available in the mathematics major. These disciplines assist students in understanding creation from a logical perspective and allows them to identify their roles in bringing healing to that creation through a moral and just application of technology.

Students working towards a computer information technology major or minor or a computer science minor are eligible for a certificate or microcredential. Certificates are offered in Fundamentals of Computer Science, Data Structures and Database Development, and Internet and Mobile Application Development. A student can receive a Microcredential in Computer Science with upon completion of the three certificates and a capstone course in Enterprise Development. Requirements for the certificate programs and microcredential are located at the end of this section.

 

General Education

The department offers courses that satisfy the general education mathematics requirement: MAT 105 College Algebra and MAT 232 Elementary Statistics.

Mathematics Placement Exams--The following are the two Placement Exams that the mathematics area offers:

  1. Calculus Placement Exam: Students wanting to enroll in either MAT 106, or MAT 201 need to take this placement exam to know which class to take.
  2. Math Placement Exam: This test is only for students wanting to test out of MAT 099 

Degree Programs

Computer Information Technology (B.S.)

The bachelor of science degree with a major in computer information technology is designed to provide (1) an appreciation for the impact of the computer on modern-day society, (2) valuable skills for use in any discipline, (3) training in rapidly growing information technology; (4) application development and deployment; (5) background necessary for graduate work in information technology. The information technology major trains students to apply the fundamental principles of information technology to projects, enterprise, operations, application implementation, security, and main systems utilized in science, business, education, and government.

This degree can be completed in three years by following the degree-in-three plan sheet, which is available from the Computing and Mathematics Department. Students majoring in computer information technology major may also choose to follow a fast-track path to an MBA degree. More information is available in the following section titled “Special Opportunities--Fast Track.”

Mathematics (B.S.)

The bachelor of science degree with a major in mathematics is designed to meet the needs of students seeking (1) a general appreciation of mathematics, (2) a foundation for graduate study in mathematics, and (3) mathematical tools required by other majors. Studying and researching the classical fields of mathematics helps to develop knowledge, skills, and reasoning abilities necessary to pursue advanced studies in mathematics. This degree can be completed in three years by following the degree-in-three plan sheet. More information is available from the Computing and Mathematics Department.

A concentration in pre-medicine (PMMC) is available for students pursuing a major in mathematics. It is designed to meet the needs of students seeking (1) a general appreciation and understanding of mathematics, (2) the necessary quantitative skills valued by health professions, (3) the pre-health professional training needed to go into health-professional careers and advanced health professional studies. This concentration provides the skills and reasoning abilities necessary to pursue advanced studies in all health professions and mathematics.

Mathematical Finance (B.S.)

The bachelor of science degree with a major in mathematical finance is designed to meet the needs of students seeking (1) a general appreciation and understanding of mathematics, (2) a foundation for graduate study in mathematics, finance, or mathematical finance, and (3) mathematical tools needed in business, finance, and quantitative analysis. This major provides the skills and reasoning abilities necessary to pursue advanced studies in mathematical finance.

Mathematics Preactuary (B.S.)

The bachelor of science degree with a major in mathematics preactuary is designed to meet the needs of students seeking (1) a general appreciation and understanding of mathematics, (2) a foundation for graduate study in mathematics or actuarial science, and (3) mathematical tools needed in business, finance, and actuarial science. This major provides the skills and reasoning abilities necessary to pursue advanced studies in actuarial science or risk management.

Mathematical Physics (B.S.)

The bachelor of science degree with a major in mathematical physics is designed to meet the needs of students seeking (1) a general appreciation and understanding of both mathematics and physics, (2) a foundation for graduate study in mathematics, physics, applied mathematics, or mathematical physics, and (3) mathematical tools needed in physics, finance, and industry. This major provides the skills and reasoning abilities necessary to pursue advanced studies in mathematics, physics, or a related discipline.

Mathematics Education (B.S.)

Students seeking licensure to teach at the secondary levels have two options: (1) completion of the mathematics education major, which leads to standard certification or (2) completion of any other major in the Computing and Mathematics Department, which can lead to alternative certification. As alternative certification is intended for those seeking career changes, requirements vary widely from state to state, and laws governing these programs can change frequently. Therefore, students interested in pursuing alternative certification need to meet with the ORU College of Education’s certification officer to ensure they are well informed prior to choosing this option. Students pursuing alternative certification need to check with the State Department of Education from any state in which they plan to teach in order to ensure they meet specific requirements for that state’s alternative certification.

 

Degree in Three

The Computing and Mathematics Department offers two majors that industrious students can complete in three years: computer information technology and mathematics. Completing a major in three years involves taking courses in the summers, including the summer before a student’s freshman year. Degree plan sheets that show how the degrees can be completed in three years are available in the Computing and Mathematics Department. 

Special Opportunities

MBA Fast-Track Program (FTP)

The Fast Track Program allows ORU senior students to enroll concurrently in graduate courses and apply those hours toward a Master of Business Administration degree (MBA) provided they have been accepted into the MBA program in their senior year. Students may register for a maximum of six semester hours of graduate courses per semester.

These students remain classified as undergraduates by the university and are billed the corresponding undergraduate tuition rate as long as enrollment remains between 12.0 and 18.5 credit hours. If enrollment is below 12.0 or exceeds 18.5 credit hours, they are billed the corresponding graduate per-credit-hour tuition rate. Students may earn up to 12 hours towards a graduate degree through the fast-track program. Graduate level courses taken through the fast-track program may not be used to fulfill undergraduate degree requirements.

Students in the computer information technology major and whose vision includes the earning of the MBA degree may reduce the time necessary to complete their study by enrolling in the Fast-Track Program. Undergraduate students in in the computer information technology major need to minor in business and take two leveling courses, which serve to help the student meet prerequisites.

 

Business Minor

ACT 215 Principles of Financial Accounting I 3

BUS 201 Principles of Economics I 3

MGT 130 Principles of Management 3

MKT 130 Principles of Marketing 3

For the elective section of the minor, students need to take the following courses:

ACT 216 Principles of Financial and Managerial Accounting II 3

BUS 325 Business Law I 3

____

Minor Total 18

Leveling Courses**

FIN 338 Financial Management 3

BUS 372 Business Ethics 3

____

Leveling Total 6

____

MBA Fast-Track Total 24

**Students may use their undergrad electives to fulfill the leveling course requirements.

To participate in the M.B.A. Fast-Track Program, a student needs to apply to the College of Business graduate admissions. General criteria used for acceptance include a 3.0 GPA and an approved undergraduate major; students with a GPA below 3.0 may be considered on a case-by-case basis.

 

Clubs and Organizations

The ORU chapter of the Association for Com-puting Machinery (ACM) provides students opportunities to establish relationships and share technological experiences and resources with professionals in the information technology field. ACM is an international scientific and educational organization dedicated to advancing the art, science, engineering, and application of information technology.

Students demonstrating scholarship in mathematics are invited to participate in the student chapter of Kappa Mu Epsilon (KME), a mathematics honor society. The society hosts conferences and competitions to promote instruction and research in mathematics.

 

Awards and Scholarships

In recognition of scholarship, leadership, and ORU lifestyle commitment, the Computing and Mathematics Department annually honors outstanding students by presenting the following awards:

Outstanding Senior Awards. The department annually honors a graduating senior in each of the following majors: computer information technology, mathematics, mathematical preactuary, mathematical physics, mathematical finance, and mathematics education. The department also recognizes the overall outstanding graduating senior.

Outstanding Senior Paper. This recognizes the department’s best senior paper in each major and thetwo overall outstanding senior papers to represent the department at the senior paper reception.

Science Faculty and Alumni Award. This award of approximately $600 is granted to one rising sophomore, one rising junior, and one rising senior from the Biology and Chemistry Department, the Engineering Department, and the Computing and Mathematics Department. The award is based on financial need and scholarship and is funded by contributions from alumni and faculty members.

  

COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MAJOR (CIT) BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

GENERAL EDUCATION

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 250, 255, 260, 270, 333, MAT 315, COMP 101%)

Mathematics (MAT 106 or 201) 3-4

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science 8

(Choice of two lecture and lab combinations: BIO 101, CHE 101, EVR 250, PHY 101 or PSC 101).

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244,  MUS 208, PSY 201, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, SWK 202). MBA Fast-track program students should take BUS 201.

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 56-57

%Must be transferred in or completed as a pre-requisite to COMP 102 to receive humanities credit.

 

MAJOR

CIT 216 Project Management 3

CIT 304 System Analysis/Design 3

CIT 306 Database Development 3

CIT 428 Information Systems 3

CIT 442 Information System Security 3

CIT 498 Senior Paper Preparation 1

CIT 499 Senior Paper/Project 2

CIT/CSC Electives (300-400 level)** 9

CSC 111 Introduction to Computing 3

CSC 206 Intermediate Programming 3

CSC 341 Internet Programming 3

CSC 441 Data Communications 3

____

Major Total 39

COGNATE

CSC 255 Data Structures 3

Choice of one of the following: 3

MAT 207 Discrete Mathematics

MAT 208 Elementary Discrete Mathematics 3            (does not count towards math minor)

Choice of one of the following: 3

MAT 232 Elementary Statistics

MAT 325 Probability and Statistics

____

Cognate Total 9

Minor** 18

Electives 6

____

Degree Total 128-129

**Students need to choose a business minor (18 hrs.) or a mathematics minor (17 hrs.); other minors need approval. Students choosing a business minor may choose to follow the Fast-Track Program toward a Master of Business Administration (MBA). More information is available in the preceding section.

  

Mathematics Major (MAT) Bachelor of Science

General Education 

Introduction to Whole Person Educ (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 250, 255, 260, 270, 333, 999, MAT 315, COMP 101%)

Discrete Mathematics (MAT 207) 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science (two science lectures and labs) 8

Choice of one of the following sequences:

BIO 111 and 112 (lecture and lab)*

CHE 111 and 112 (lecture and lab)

PHY 111 and 112 (lecture and lab)

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244)*

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 56

*Students pursuing the pre-medicine concentration must complete the BIO 111 and 112 lecture and lab sequence as well as PSY 201.

%Must be transferred in or completed as a pre-requisite to COMP 102 to receive humanities credit.

Major

MAT 201 Calculus I 4

MAT 202 Calculus II 4

MAT 211 Differential Equations 3

MAT 312 Linear & Matrix Algebra 3

MAT 321 Calculus III 4

MAT 498 Senior Paper/Project Preparation 1

MAT 499 Senior Paper/Project 2

MAT Elective (MAT 300 or 400 level)* 3

Choice of two of the four following courses: 6

MAT 325 Probability and Statistics

MAT 401 Higher Algebra

MAT 421 Advanced Calculus

MAT 455 Mathematical Methods in Physics

____

Major Total 30

*MAT 332 Biostatistics does not count towards a major or minor in mathematics.

Pre-medicine Concentration (PMMC) (optional)*

CHE 111 General Chemistry I (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 112 General Chemistry II (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 211 Organic Chemistry I (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 212 Organic Chemistry II (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 459 Biochemistry (lecture and lab) 4

PHY 111 Physics I (lecture and lab) 4

PHY 112 Physics II (lecture and lab) 4

BIO Elective (300-400 level lectur and lab) 4

MAT 332 Biostatistics 3

PHP 100 Pre-health Professions Seminar 1

Choice of one of the three following courses: 3

PSY 301 Developmental Psychology

PSY 305 Physiological Psychology

PSY 338 Psychology of Abnormal Human Behavior

____

Concentration Total 39

Electives** 3

*Students competing the concentration in pre-medicine do not complete the cognate, minor or elective hours referenced below.

**Recommended electives include BIO 200 and CSC 111 or PHS 223 lecture and lab.

Cognate

CSC 111 Introduction to Computing 3

CSC 206 Intermediate Programming 3

____

Cognate Total 6

Minor 18

Electives 18

____

Degree Total 128

  

Mathematical Finance Major (MFN) Bachelor of Science

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Educ (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 250, 255, 260, 270,333, 999, MAT 315, COMP 101%)

Mathematics (MAT 232) 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science 8

Choice of one of the following sequences:

BIO 111 and 112 (lecture and lab)

CHE 111 and 112 (lecture and lab)

PHY 111 and 112 (lecture and lab)

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Social Science (FIN 244) 3

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 56

%Must be transferred in or completed as a pre-requisite to COMP 102 to receive humanities credit.

Major

CSC 111 Introduction to Computing 3

CSC 206 Intermediate Programming 3

MAT 201 Calculus I 4

MAT 202 Calculus II 4

MAT 211 Differential Equations 3

MAT 312 Linear and Matrix Algebra 3

MAT 321 Calculus III 4

MAT 498 Senior Paper/Project Preparation 1

MAT 499 Senior Paper/Project 2

FIN 338 Financial Management 3

FIN 418 Investments 3

FIN 438 Advanced Financial Management 3

Choice of one of the following courses: 3

MAT 325 Probability and Statistics

MAT 421 Advanced Calculus

PHY 455 Mathematical Methods in Physics

FIN 303 Money and Banking Finance

FIN 461 Capital Markets

____

Major Total 39

Cognate

ACT 215 Principles of Financial Accounting I 3

ACT 216 Principles of Financial and Managerial Accounting II 3

ACT 320 Quantitative Analysis 3

BUS 201 Principles of Economics I 3

BUS 202 Principles of Economics II 3

BUS 325 Business Law I 3

MGT 130 Principles of Management 3

MGT 431 Strategic Management 3

MKT 130 Principles of Marketing 3

____

Cognate Total 27

Electives 6

____

Degree Total 128

  

Mathematics Preactuary Major (MpA) Bachelor of Science

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Educ (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 250, 255, 260, 270, 333, 999, MAT 315, COMP 101%)

Mathematics (MAT 232) 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science 8

Choice of one of the following sequences:

BIO 111 and 112 (lecture and lab)

CHE 111 and 112 (lecture and lab)

PHY 111 and 112 (lecture and lab)

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Social Science Elective

(Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244)

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 56

%Must be transferred in or completed as a pre-requisite to COMP 102 to receive humanities credit.

Major

MAT 201 Calculus I 4

MAT 202 Calculus II 4

MAT 207 Discrete Mathematics 3

MAT 211 Differential Equations 3

MAT 312 Linear and Matrix Algebra 3

MAT 321 Calculus III 4

MAT 325 Probability and Statistics 3

MAT 421 Advanced Calculus 3

MAT ___  Elective (300-400) 3

MAT 498 Senior Paper/Project Preparation 1

MAT 499 Senior Paper/Project 2

____

Major Total 33

Cognate

CSC 111 Introduction to Computing 3

CSC 206 Intermediate Programming 3

ACT 215 Principles of Financial Accounting I 3

ACT 216 Principles of Financial and Managerial Accounting II 3

ACT 320 Quantitative Analysis 3

BUS 201 Principles of Economics I 3

BUS 202 Principles of Economics II 3

FIN 338 Financial Management 3

FIN 418 Investments 3

FIN 438 Advanced Financial Management 3

____

Cognate Total 30

Electives 9

____

Degree Total 128

  

Mathematical physics Major (MpH) Bachelor of Science

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Educ (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 250, 255, 260, 270, 333, 999 MAT 315, COMP 101%)

Mathematics (MAT 207) 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science 8

Choice of one of the following sequences:

BIO 111 and 112 (lecture and lab)

CHE 111 and 112 (lecture and lab)

PHY 111 and 112 (lecture and lab)

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244)

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 56

%Must be transferred in or completed as a pre-requisite to COMP 102 to receive humanities credit.

Major

PHY 211 Modern Physics Lecture 3

PHY 211L Modern Physics Lab 1

PHY 321 Electromagnetic Theory 3

PHY 341L Advanced Physics Lab 1

PHY 402 Quantum Mechanics 3

Choice of one of the following two courses: 3

PHY 401 Optics

PHY 450 Special Topics

MAT 201 Calculus I 4

MAT 202 Calculus II 4

MAT 211 Differential Equations 3

MAT 312 Linear and Matrix Algebra 3

MAT 321 Calculus III 4

MAT 455 Mathematical Methods in Physics 3

MAT 498 Senior Paper/Project Preparation 1

MAT 499 Senior Paper/Project 2

Choice of two of the following three courses: 6

MAT 325 Probability and Statistics

MAT 401 Higher Algebra

MAT 421 Advanced Calculus

____

Major Total 44

Cognate

CSC 111 Introduction to Computing 3

CSC 206 Intermediate Programming 3

____

Cognate Total 6

Minor 18

Electives 5

____

Degree Total 129

  

Mathematics Education Major (MATE) with Secondary School Teaching Licensure Bachelor of Science

Students seeking licensure to teach at the secondary levels have two options: (1)completion of the mathematics education major, which leads to standard certification or (2) completion of any other major in the Computing and Mathematics Department, which can lead to alternative certification. One class at the graduate level is required for alternative certification in the state of Oklahoma; however, it is not required for graduation. Students seeking alternative certification need to check with the State Department of Education of any state in which they plan to teach in order to ensure they meet specific requirements for that state’s alternative certification. Students interested in a teaching license should work closely with the advisor in the major department.

This major is designed for students wanting to teach mathematics at the middle or high school levels and meets the State of Oklahoma specific requirements for licensure. This major is offered in cooperation with the ORU College of Education; therefore, students interested in this major should work with both the advisor in this department and with the College of Education.

Students may earn licensure in a second subject/content area. The Oklahoma Commission for Teacher Preparation requires the OSAT/OPTE test(s) be passed in order to obtain a license in an additional subject/content area. Students interested in completing coursework toward additional licensing should consult the subject area advisor.

General Education 

Introduction to Whole Person Educ (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the  following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101%)

Mathematics (MAT 106) 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Biology (BIO 101 or 111 lecture and lab) 4

Physical Science (PSC 101 lecture and lab) 4

Social Science (SOC 323) 3

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Foreign Language Proficiency (PRFL 001) 0

(exam or 102 level of a foreign language class)

Health and Physical Education 4.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, Basic First Aid/CPR,swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 55.5

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

%Must be transferred in or completed as a pre-requisite to COMP 102 to receive humanities credit.

Major

MAT 201 Calculus I 4

MAT 202 Calculus II 4

MAT 207 Discrete Mathematics 3

MAT 211 Differential Equations 3

MAT 221 Math Concepts I 3

MAT 312 Linear & Matrix Algebra 3

MAT 313 College Geometry 3

MAT 315 History of Mathematics 3

MAT 321 Calculus III 4

MAT 325 Probability and Statistics 3

MAT 401 Higher Algebra 3

Choice of one of the following 3

MAT 318 Elementary Number Theory

MAT 421 Advanced Calculus

____

Major Total 39

Cognate

CSC 111 Introduction to Computing 3

CSC 206 Intermediate Programming 3

MAT 451 Mathematics Education Internship 2

____

Cognate Total 8

Professional Education

PED 100 Education Seminar (every semester) 0

PED 121 Field Experience/ Based 1

Practicum (Secondary)

PED 203 Foundations and Methods of 3 Education

PED 222 School Health Care 1

PED 305 Pedagogy I 4

PED 306 Pedagogy II 4

PED 361 Professional Education Seminar/ 0

Portfolio

PED 485 Student Teaching: 7-9 5

PED 495 Student Teaching: 10-12 5

MAT 428 Secondary Methods: Mathematics 3

____

Professional Education Total 26

Electives 3

____

Degree Total 131.5

  

Computer Information Technology Minor (CITM)

CIT 206 Intermediate Programming 3

CIT 216 Project Management 3

CSC 111 Introduction to Computing 3

Choice of three courses 9

CIT/CSC Electives (300 level or above)* 9

____

Minor Total 18

*Excludes CIT 450, 498, and 499.

Computer Science Minor (CSCM)

CSC 111 Introduction to Computing 3

CSC 206 Intermediate Programming 3

CSC 255 Data Structures 3

CSC 341 Internet Programming 3

CIT 306 Database Development 3

CIT 352 Mobile Application Development 3

____

Minor Total 18

Mathematics Minor (MATM)

MAT 201 Calculus I 4

MAT 202 Calculus II 4

MAT 207 Discrete Mathematics 3

MAT 312 Linear & Matrix Algebra 3

MAT 300 or 400 level course _____  3 

____

Minor Total 17

 
Fundamentals of Computer Science Certificate (CFC)

CSC 111 Introduction to Computing 3

CSC 206 Intermediate Programming 3

____

Certificate Total 6

Fundamentals of Data Structures and Database Development Certificate (CDD)*

CIT 306 Database Development 3

CSC 255 Data Structures 3

____

Certificate Total 6

Internet and Mobile Application Development Certificate (CIM)*

CIT 352 Mobile Application Development 3

CSC 341 Internet Programming 3

____

Certificate Total 6

Computer Science Microcredential (MCS)

Certificate in Fundamentals of Computer Science

Certificate in Data Structures & Database Dev.

Certificate in Internet and Mobile Application Dev.

CIT 302 Enterprise Development

____

Microcredential Total 21

*The Certificate in Fundamentals of Computer Science must be completed prior to either of the other certificate programs.

  

Departmental Courses

Descriptions of the courses listed below are in the section titled Course Descriptions at the end of this catalog. Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order by the prefix.
Computer Information Technology

CIT 216 Project Management

CIT 302 Enterprise Development

CIT 304 System Analysis/Design

CIT 306 Database Development

CIT 314 Programming in the Linux Environment

CIT 352 Mobile Application Development

CIT 428 Information Systems

CIT 442 Information System Security

CIT 450 Internship

CIT 454 Special Topics in Computer Information Technology

CIT 498 Senior Paper/Project Preparation

CIT 499 Senior Paper/Project

CIT 999 Elective

Computer Science

CSC 101 Computer Concepts

CSC 111 Introduction to Computing

CSC 112 Microcomputer Applications in Business

CSC 206 Intermediate Programming

CSC 255 Data Structures

CSC 341 Internet Programming

CSC 441 Data Communication

CSC 454 Special Topics in Computer Science

CSC 999 Elective

Mathematics

MAT 099 Introduction to College Mathematics

MAT 105 College Algebra

MAT 106 Trigonometry

MAT 151 Mathematics and Society

MAT 201 Calculus I

MAT 202 Calculus II

MAT 207 Discrete Mathematics

MAT 211 Differential Equations

MAT 221 Mathematics Concepts I

MAT 222 Mathematics Concepts II

MAT 232 Elementary Statistics

MAT 312 Linear and Matrix Algebra

MAT 313 College Geometry

MAT 315 History of Mathematics

MAT 318 Elementary Number Theory

MAT 321 Calculus III

MAT 325 Probability and Statistics

MAT 332 Introduction to Biostatistics

MAT 401 Higher Algebra

MAT 421 Advanced Calculus I

MAT 422 Advanced Calculus II

MAT 428 Secondary Methods: Mathematics

MAT 429 Topics in Mathematics

MAT 433 Applied Statistics

MAT 451 Mathematics Education Internship

MAT 455 Mathematical Methods in Physics

MAT 498 Senior Paper/Project Preparation

MAT 499 Senior Paper/Project

MAT 999 Elective

Proficiency Exam

PRFP 101 Calculus Proficiency Exam

  

Engineering Department

John Matsson, Ph.D., Chair

 

MISSION STATEMENT:

The Engineering Department seeks to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and experiences that will prepare them to solve real world problems within the context of a Christian worldview. This training (1) equips students in the application of science and mathematics for the improvement of the physical world, and (2) enables graduates to enter the engineering and scientific communities and contribute to the healing of the human condition. The department supports the overall university mission by developing analytical reasoning and problem solving in science and engineering and by promoting understanding and reconciliation among the fields of science and theology.

The Engineering Department offers bachelors degrees in three fields: (1) engineering, (2) engineering physics, and (3) biomedical engineering. The department also offers a minor in physics, and general education courses for students university-wide.

An articulation program simplifies the transfer for students from Tulsa Community College (TCC) engineering programs to the engineering programs at ORU. The program is designed to enable students to earn an associate in science degree from TCC and then transfer to ORU to complete a bachelor’s degree in science.

  

Degree Programs

Engineering (B.S.E.)

The Engineering Department has an ABET, Inc. accredited bachelor of science in engineering (B.S.E.) degree with a mechanical, electrical, or computer engineering concentration. This degree is designed to prepare students to enter professional engineering practice and to provide instruction that will serve as an adequate foundation for graduate studies. This curriculum includes concentrations in electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, and computer engineering. All engineering majors are required to take the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Exam before graduation.

 

Biomedical Engineering (B.S.)

The bachelor of science degree with a major in biomedical engineering is designed to provide an engineering background for students planning to pursue advanced studies in biomedical engineering, medicine, or other health professions. This degree is not designed for students who want to enter directly into the practice of professional engineering following undergraduate study.

 

Engineering Physics (B.S.)

The department offers a course of study leading to a bachelor of science degree with a major in engineering physics. Physics is the study of physical phenomena that occur in the universe. Knowledge of physics is required to understand the mechanisms that hold matter together at the subatomic, atomic, observational, and astronomic levels. As the principles of physics find wide application in other branches of science (e.g., chemistry, biology, medicine, etc,) the engineering physics major is designed to provide the necessary tools for students to become professional physicists who upon graduation may choose to enter industry, professional school, or graduate school. To prepare physics students for careers in engineering or physics upon graduating, the engineering physics curriculum emphasizes application of physics concepts to various engineering topics and problems. During the senior year, students may choose to study either a design problem or a research problem.

 

Admission to the Engineering Program

Engineering is the discipline and profession of applying mathematics and natural sciences to design and implement solutions of relevant problems in society. Engineers are professionals who turn ideas into reality, designing products and processes that are beneficial to people.

Initial admission to pursue a major in any of the engineering disciplines is provisional. Transfer students and students transferring from other majors at ORU must meet the same requirements to be fully admitted to the engineering degree program. Full admission is based on the following steps:

  • Completion of the required engineering, science, and math courses as listed through the third semester of the respective degree plans with a minimum GPA of 2.25 in those courses.
  • Submission of a written application, including an unofficial transcript, to the chairman expressing intent to enter the full program.
  • Completion of an interview with the engineering faculty prior to final acceptance.

In addition, students must earn at least a grade of "C" in any prerequisite courses in order to continue in the engineering or cognate courses. To successfully complete the program, students must earn a grade of "C" or above in all major and cognate courses as well as MAT 201, PHY 111, PHY 111L, CHE 111 and CHE 111L. Engineering Physics majors must also earn a grade of "C" or above in CHE 112 and CHE 112L. Students may not repeat a course more than two times.

 

Clubs and Organizations

The ORU student section of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) meets regularly to promote networking among professionals with a mechanical engineering emphasis. Participation with ASME professional development conferences offers students opportunities to present research and interact with working professionals.

The ORU student section of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) offers opportunities for students with electrical engineering or computer engineering emphases to engage in professional collaboration and participate in student competitions.

The ORU student section of the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) stimulates women to achieve full potential in careers as engineers and leaders and to expand the image of the engineering profession as a positive force in improving the quality of life and demonstrating the value of diversity. SWE fosters communication between young women, educators, and business professionals to provide encouragement and support to break down barriers for women interested in STEM careers.

Opportunities for professional networking and development are also available to students through participation with the ORU student section of the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers.

 

Awards and Scholarships

In recognition of scholarship, leadership, and ORU lifestyle commitment, the Engineering Department--individually as well as in collaboration with the Biology and Chemistry Department--annually honors outstanding students by presenting the following awards:

Outstanding Senior Awards. The department annually honors a graduating senior in each of the following majors: biomedical engineering, engineering, and engineering physics. The department also recognizes the overall outstanding graduating senior.

Outstanding Senior Paper. This recognizes the department’s best senior paper in each major.

Outstanding Research Design Project. This recognizes the department’s best senior research project.

Science Faculty and Alumni Award. This award of approximately $600 is granted to one rising sophomore, one rising junior, and one rising senior from the Biology and Chemistry Department, Computing and Mathematics, and the Engineering Department. The award is based on financial need and scholarship and is funded by contributions from alumni and faculty members.

James Wilkes Pugh Memorial Award. This fund is designated for majors in the natural sciences (Biology and Chemistry Department and the Engineering Department) who live in the Ozark regions of Missouri, Arkansas, and Oklahoma. This award is approximately $500.

 

Engineering Major (EGR) Bachelor of Science in Engineering

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101^, MAT 315)

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110,120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Chemistry (CHE 111 lecture and lab) 4

Physics (PHY 111 lecture and lab) 4

Mathematics (MAT 201) 4

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: MUS 208, PSY 201, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244)

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 001 and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses.)

____

General Education Total 57

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

^Can count for humanities for students who have not taken COMP 102.

Major

EGR 100 Engineering/Physics Seminar*0

EGR 101 Introduction to Engineering 2

EGR 140 Engineering Graphics 2

EGR 210 Network Analysis I (lecture and lab)**

EGR 221 Mechanics I: Statics 3

EGR 231 Heat and Thermodynamics 3

EGR 252 Engineering Computational Methods 3

EGR 461 Engineering Management and 2 Economy

EGR 498 Senior Design and Research I 2

EGR 499 Senior Design and Research II 2

PHY 112 Physics II (lecture and lab) 4

PRFR 001 F.E. Exam Attempted Proficiency 0

____

Major Total 27

*All students must pass the seminar course each semester they are enrolled in this major.

**Mechanical engineering concentration students take EGR 225 lecture and lab; all others take EGR 210 lecture and lab.

Note: As part of the engineering major, students need to select one of the following concentrations and its corresponding cognate. Technical electives should be chosen so that there are sufficient engineering science and engineering design components to prepare students for professional practice in the chosen concentration.

Mechanical Engineering Concentration (MEC)

EGR 222 Mechanics II: Dynamics 3

EGR 330 Control Systems 3

ME 321 Mechanics of Materials 3

ME 331 Applied Thermodynamics 3

ME 381 Principles of Design 3

ME 433 Heat Transfer 3

ME 441 Fluid Mechanics 3

ME 444 Experimental Methods 3

ME 447 Finite Element Method 3

ME 461 Manufacturing Processes 3

Choice of two of the following courses:6

EGR 331 Design of Control Systems

ME 371 Machines and Mechanisms

ME 450 Special Topics

____

MEC Concentration Total 36

Mechanical Engineering Cognate

MAT 202 Calculus II 4

MAT 211 Differential Equations 3

MAT 312 Linear and Matrix Algebra 3

MAT 321 Calculus III 4

MAT 325 Probability and Statistics 3

____

MEC Cognate Total 17

____

Degree Total with MEC Concentration 137

Electrical Engineering Concentration (EEC)

PHY 211 Introduction to Modern Physics 4 (lecture and lab)

EGR 222 Mechanics II: Dynamics 3

EGR 330 Control Systems 3

EE 311 Network Analysis II 3

EE 321 Electronics I (lecture and lab) 4

EE 322 Electronics II (lecture and lab) 4

EE 360 Electromagnetic Theory 3

CMPE 340 Digital Systems Design 4 (lecture and lab)

Choice of four of the following technical electives: 12

EE 325 Design w/ Standard Components

EE 450 Digital Signal Processing

EGR 331 Design of Control Systems

CMPE 312 Computer Networks and Communications

CMPE 441 Microprocessor Systems Design

CMPE 443 Computer Architecture

CMPE 450 Special Topics: Artificial Intelligence

____

Electrical Engineering Concentration Total 40

Electrical Engineering Cognate

MAT 202 Calculus II 4

MAT 211 Differential Equations 3

MAT 321 Calculus III 4

MAT Elective (upper division) 3

____

EEC Cognate Total 14

____

Degree Total with EEC Concentration 138

Computer Engineering Concentration (CEC)

CMPE 340 Digital Systems Design 4 (lecture and lab)

CMPE 441 Microprocessor Systems Design 3

CMPE 443 Computer Architecture 3

CSC 206 Intermediate Programming 3

EE 321 Electronics I (lecture and lab) 4

EE 322 Electronics II (lecture and lab) 4

PHY 211 Introduction to Modern Physics 4 (lecture and lab)

Choice of five of the following technical electives: 15

CSC 255 Data Structures

CMPE 312 Computer Networks and Communications

CMPE 450 Special Topics: Artificial Intelligence

EE 311 Network Analysis II

EE 325 Design with Standard Components

EE 450 Special Topics: Digital Signal Processing

EGR 330 Control Systems

____

Concentration Total 40

Computer Engineering Cognate

MAT 202 Calculus II 4

MAT 211 Differential Equations 3

MAT 321 Calculus III 4

MAT Elective (upper division) 3

____

CEC Cognate Total 14

____

Degree Total with CEC Concentration 138

  

BIOmedical ENGINEERING major (EGRB) Bachelor of Science

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101^, MAT 315)

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Chemistry (CHE 111 lecture and lab) 4

Physics (PHY 111 lecture and lab) 4

Mathematics (MAT 201) 4

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: MUS 208, PSY 201, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244)

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 001 and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses.)

____

General Education Total 57

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

^Can count for humanities for students who have not taken COMP 102.

Major

EGR 100 Engineering/Physics Seminar * 0

EGR 101 Introduction to Engineering 2

EGR 140 Engineering Graphics 2

EGR 210 Network Analysis I (lecture and lab) 4

EGR 221 Mechanics I: Statics 3

EGR 222 Mechanics II: Dynamics 3

EGR 252 Engineering Computational Methods 3

EGR 498 Senior Design and Research I 2

EGR 499 Senior Design and Research II 2

BE 310 Biomedical Engineering Survey 3

EE 311 Network Analysis II 3

EE 321 Electronics I (lecture and lab) 4

EE 322 Electronics II (lecture and lab) 4

EE 360 Electromagnetic Theory 3

CHE 112 General Chemistry II (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 211 Organic Chemistry I (lecture and lab) 4

CHE 212 Organic Chemistry II (lecture and lab) 4

PHY 112 Physics II (lecture and lab) 4

BIO 111 Introduction to Biology I (lecture and lab) 4

PHS 223 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 (lecture and lab)

PHS 224 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 (lecture and lab)

Choice of one of the following lectures and labs: 4

BIO 311 Medical Genetics (lecture and lab)

BIO 411 Molecular Cell Biology (lecture and lab)

BIO 431 Developmental Biology (lecture and lab)

____

Major Total 70

*All students must pass the seminar course each semester they are enrolled in this major.

Cognate

MAT 202 Calculus II 4

MAT 211 Differential Equations 3

MAT 321 Calculus III 4

____

Cognate Total 11

____

Degree Total 138

  

Engineering Physics Major (EGRP) Bachelor of Science

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101^, MAT 315)

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110,120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Chemistry (CHE 111, 112 lecture and lab) 8

Mathematics (MAT 201) 4

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: MUS 208, PSY 201, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244)

Health and Physical Education 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 001 and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses.)

____

General Education Total 57

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

^Can count for humanities for students who have not taken COMP 102.

Major

EGR 100 Engineering/Physics Seminar* 0

EGR 101 Introduction to Engineering 2

EGR 140 Engineering Graphics 2

EGR 210 Network Analysis I (lecture and lab) 4

EGR 252 Engineering Computational Methods 3

PHY 111 Physics I (lecture and lab) 4

PHY 112 Physics II (lecture and lab) 4

PHY 211 Modern Physics (lecture and lab) 4

PHY 302 Heat and Thermodynamics 3

PHY 311 Mechanics I: Statics 3

PHY 312 Mechanics II: Dynamics 3

PHY 321 Electronics I (lecture and lab) 4

PHY 331 Electromagnetic Theory 3

PHY 341 Advanced Physics Laboratory 1

PHY 401 Optics 3

PHY 402 Quantum Mechanics 3

PHY 498 Senior Research and Design I 2

PHY 499 Senior Research and Design II 2

EGR/MAT/PHY Electives (300 or 400 level courses) 15

 ____

Major Total 65

*All students must pass the seminar course each semester they are enrolled in this major.

Cognate

MAT 202 Calculus II 4

MAT 211 Differential Equations 3

MAT 312 Linear and Matrix Algebra 3

MAT 321 Calculus III 4

MAT 325 Probability and Statistics 3

____

Cognate Total 17

____

Degree Total 139

  

Physics Minor (PHYM)

This program is designed for students majoring in another discipline who desire a minor in physics.

PHY 111 Physics I (lecture and lab) 4

PHY 112 Physics II (lecture and lab) 4

PHY 211 Introduction to Modern Physics (lecture and lab) 4

PHY Electives (upper division) 6

____

Total 18

 

Cognate

MAT 201 Calculus I 4

MAT 202 Calculus II 4

____

Cognate Total 8

____

Minor Total 26

 

Departmental Courses

Descriptions of the courses listed below are in the section titled Course Descriptions at the end of this catalog. Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order by the prefix.

Biomedical Engineering

BE 450 Biomedical Engineering Survey

BE 450 Special Topics

BE 495 Directed Studies

BE 999 Elective

 

Computer Engineering

CMPE 312 Computer Networks and Communications

CMPE 340 Digital Systems Design Lecture

CMPE 340L Digital Systems Design Laboratory

CMPE 441 Microprocessor Systems Design

CMPE 443 Computer Architecture

CMPE 450 Special Topics

CMPE 495 Directed Study

CMPE 999 Elective

 

Electrical Engineering

EE 311 Network Analysis II

EE 321 Electronics I Lecture

EE 321L Electronics I Laboratory

EE 322 Electronics II Lecture

EE 322L Electronics II Laboratory

EE 325 Design with Standard Components

EE 360 Electromagnetic Theory

EE 361 Power Systems Analysis

EE 363 Electromechanical Devices

EE 450 Special Topics

EE 462 Design of Power Systems

EE 495 Directed Study

EE 999 Elective

Engineering

EGR 100 Engineering and Physics Seminar

EGR 101 Introduction to Engineering

EGR 140 Engineering Graphics

EGR 210 Network Analysis I Lecture

EGR 210L Network Analysis I Lab

EGR 221 Mechanics I: Statics

EGR 222 Mechanics II: Dynamics

EGR 225 Circuits and Electronics

EGR 225L Circuits and Electronics Lab

EGR 231 Heat and Thermodynamics

EGR 252 Engineering Computational Methods

EGR 330 Control Systems

EGR 331 Design of Control Systems

EGR 461 Engineering Management and Economy

EGR 498 Senior Design and Research I

EGR 499 Senior Design and Research II

EGR 999 Elective

 

Geography

GEO 201 Principles of Earth Science Lecture

GEO 201 Principles of Earth Science Laboratory

GEO 307 Cultural Geography

GEO 350 Environmental Geography

GEO 999 Elective

 

Mechanical Engineering

ME 321 Mechanics of Materials

ME 331 Applied Thermodynamics

ME 371 Machines and Mechanisms

ME 381 Principles of Design

ME 433 Heat Transfer

 

ME 441 Fluid Mechanics

ME 444 Experimental Methods

ME 447 Finite Element Method

ME 450 Special Topics

ME 461 Manufacturing Processes

ME 495 Directed Study

ME 999 Elective

 

Physics

PHY 101 General Physics I Lecture

PHY 101L General Physics I Laboratory

PHY 102 General Physics II Lecture

PHY 102L General Physics II Laboratory

PHY 111 Physics I Lecture

PHY 111L Physics I Laboratory

PHY 112 Physics II Lecture

PHY 112L Physics II Laboratory

PHY 211 Introduction to Modern Physics Lecture

PHY 211L Introduction to Modern Physics Laboratory

PHY 302 Heat and Thermodynamics

PHY 311 Mechanics I: Statics

PHY 312 Mechanics II: Dynamics

PHY 321 Electronics I Lecture

PHY 321L Electronics I Laboratory

PHY 331 Electromagnetic Theory

PHY 334 Vibrations and Sound

PHY 341L Advanced Physics Laboratory

PHY 401 Optics

PHY 402 Quantum Mechanics

PHY 450 Special Topics

PHY 453 Applied Thermodynamics

PHY 454 Mechanics of Materials

PHY 455 Mathematical Methods in Physics

PHY 498 Senior Research and Design I

PHY 499 Senior Research and Design II

PHY 999 Elective

Physical Science

PSC 101 Principles of Physical Science Lecture

PSC 101L Principles of Physical Science Laboratory

PSC 103 Broadcast Electronics Lecture

PSC 103L Broadcast Electronics Laboratory

PSC 201 Principles of Earth Science Lecture

PSC 201L Principles of Earth Science Laboratory

PSC 350 Environmental Geography Lecture

PSC 350L Environmental Geography Laboratory

PSC 999 Elective

  

Health, Leisure, and Sport Sciences Department

Fritz Huber, Ed. D., Chair

 

MISSION STATEMENT:

The mission of the Health, Leisure, and Sport Sciences department is to complete the wholeness of the students of Oral Roberts University by imparting lifelong, foundational concepts concerning the development of a healthy lifestyle that includes physical fitness. In addition, it seeks to provide the departmental majors with knowledge and experiences to prepare them to successfully fulfill God’s calling on their lives and go into every person’s world.

 

Overview

The health, leisure, and sport sciences program is an integral part of the university’s whole-person philosophy. Its objectives are (1) to develop aerobic fitness and to maintain a strong and healthy body through proper physical activity and good health habits; (2) to acquaint the student with the knowledge necessary to participate in a variety of physical activities; (3) to aid the student in acquiring skills in lifetime sports and recreational activities; (4) to provide a climate in which the student may achieve habits of initiative, self-responsibility, and loyalty, and learn to live socially and cooperatively with others; (5) to acquaint the student with a continuing program of lifetime health and fitness; and (6) to provide a curriculum through which a student may qualify for certification to teach or to work in numerous fields of health, physical education, recreation, and sports management.

 

General Education Courses

ORU was founded on a concept of education for the whole person, equally emphasizing the development of the mind, spirit, and body. For that reason, each ORU student is required to pass a physical education activity course each semester and to pursue an individual fitness program. Each physical education activity course may be taken only twice for credit toward fulfilling the physical education requirement for graduation.

The ORU program focuses on the concept of aerobics, a physical-fitness program designed by Dr. Kenneth H. Cooper, a former Air Force physician and innovator of the exercise program used by the astronauts. It is a program designed to increase the capacity of the heart, lungs, and blood vessels through a calculated series of exercises that emphasizes walking, running, swimming, and cycling. These exercises require one to breathe harder and faster. The greater the oxygen intake, the harder the heart and lungs must work. The more these organs work, the stronger they become. This reduces the chances of heart disease and related physical ailments later in life.

 

Degree Programs

In addition to the physical activity courses and aerobics requirements for all students, the Health, Leisure, and Sport Sciences department offers four majors and three minors.

 

Health and Exercise Science (B.S.)

This major helps prepare students for careers in health and exercise science related areas. Students with this major choose one of three areas of concentration: exercise specialist, prephysical therapy, and presports medicine. Students also have choices in electives. This major is also excellent for students wanting to continue their studies in one of the Health, Leisure, and Sport Sciences Department’s articulation agreements: occupational theraphy and physical therapy.

This degree can be completed in three years by following the degree-in-three plan sheet. More information is available from the Health, Leisure, and Sport Sciences Department.

 

Leisure Science (B.S.)

The leisure science major includes courses in organizing and administering recreation programs, safety and first aid, leadership, outdoor recreation, and the theory and analysis of sports. The major also includes an internship.

This degree can be completed in three years by following the degree-in-three plan sheet. More information is available from the Health, Leisure, and Sport Sciences Department.

 

Health and Physical Education (B.S.)

Students seeking licensure to teach at the K-12 levels have two options: (1) completion of the health and physical education major, which leads to standard certification or (2) completion of any other major in the HLSS Department, which can lead to alternative certification. One class at the graduate level is required for alternative certification in the state of Oklahoma; however, it is not required for graduation. Students seeking alternative certification need to check with the State Department of Education from any state in which they plan to teach in order to ensure they meet specific requirements for that state’s alternative certification. Students interested in a teaching license should work closely with the advisor in the major department.

This degree is designed for students wanting to teach physical education in private or public schools. The program meets the requirements for the State of Oklahoma’s teaching license for elementary through high school grades in this field.

 

Sports Management (B.S.)

The sports management major includes courses in organizing and administering athletic programs, safety and first aid, leadership, legal and ethical aspects, and the psychology of sports. The major also includes an internship.

 

Occupational Therapy Articulation Agreement

ORU has an articulation agreement with the University of Oklahoma-Tulsa (OU-Tulsa) for earning a Master of Science degree in occupational therapy. This program allows area students to complete a bachelor's and master’s degree in occupational therapy in Tulsa. The first 90 hours, which includes general education and science classes, are taken at ORU and the remainder of the degrees at OU-Tulsa. Information is available in the ORU Health, Leisure, and Sport Sciences Department and at OU-Tulsa.

 

Physical Therapy Articulation Agreements

Oral Roberts University has two articulation agreements enabling students to begin physical therapy degrees at ORU and complete them at other universities.

ORU has an articulation agreement with the University of Oklahoma-Tulsa (OU-Tulsa) for earning a doctoral degree in physical therapy. This program provides an opportunity for area students to complete a bachelor's and doctoral degree in physical therapy in Tulsa. The first 60 hours, which includes general education and science classes, are taken at ORU and the remainder of the degrees at OU-Tulsa. Information is available in the ORU Health, Leisure, and Sport Sciences Department and at OU-Tulsa.

ORU also has an articulation agreement with Southwest Baptist University (SBU). A student who completes a baccalaureate degree in any major at ORU and the requirements for admission to the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program at Southwest Baptist University as listed here will automatically receive preference and be eligible for the admission process.

  • Have a minimum 2.75 overall GPA.
  • Complete the graduate record exam.
  • Complete and return physical therapy packet by June 15th of year prior to enrollment.
  • Document 40 hours experience/observation in physical therapy.
  • Meet admissions eligibility requirements in SBU catalog (if international student).
  • Demonstrate computer literacy.
  • Complete the following prerequisite courses with a minimum of a “C” and 3.0 prerequisite GPA. (Prerequisites should not be taken pass/fail.): CHE 111 and 112, PHY 101 and 102, BIO 111, PHS 223 and 224, MAT 232, and two psychology courses except PSY 232.

 

Awards

In recognition of scholarship, leadership, and ORU lifestyle commitment, the Health, Physical Education, and Recreation Department annually honors outstanding students by the presentation of the following awards:

Outstanding Senior Award: This recognizes the de-partment’s most worthy graduating senior in each of the majors: health and physical education, health and exercise science, recreation administration, and sports management.

Outstanding Health, Leisure, and Sport Sciences Senior Paper and Project: This recognizes the department’s best senior research paper and project.

  

Health and Exercise Science Major (HES) Bachelor of Science

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science 12

(CHE 101 or 111**, PHS 223, and PHS 224)

Mathematics*** (MAT 232 or MAT 201) 3-4

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315)

Social Science Elective^ 3

(Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244)

Health and Physical Education 4.5

(Health Fitness I and II; Weight Training; and four elective activities)

____

General Education Total 59.5-60.5

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

**CHE 111 is required for prephysical therapy and presports medicine concentrations.

***The presports medicine concentration requires MAT 201. Exercise specialist and prephysical therapy take MAT 232.

^Prephysical therapy and presports medicine students need to take PSY 201 for the social sciences elective.

Major

HLSS 200 Introduction to Exercise Science 3

HLSS 231 Personal Health Science 3

HLSS 233 Safety and First Aid 3

HLSS 315 Organization and Administration of Programs 3

HLSS 316 Kinesiology and Biomechanics 3

HLSS 320 Prevention and Care of Sports Injuries 3

HLSS 324 Exercise Physiology 3

HLSS 402 Exercise Prescriptions for Special Populations 3

HLSS 412 Techniques of Health Fitness Evaluation 3

HLSS 499 Senior Paper/Project 3

____

Major Total 30

Cognate

CSC 112 Microcomputer Applications in Business 3

NUT 201 Nutrition 3

____

Cognate Total 6

All health and exercise science majors take the above general education, the cognate, major courses, and choose one of the three concentrations listed below.

Exercise Specialist Concentration (EXSC)

HLSS 481 Internship in Health and Exercise Science 12

____

Concentration Total 12

Minor and/or Electives 21

____

Degree Total 128.5

Prephysical Therapy Concentration (PTC)

BIO 111 Introductory Biology I Lecture 3

BIO 111 Introductory Biology I Laboratory 1

CHE 112 Chemistry II Lecture 3

CHE 112 Chemistry II Laboratory 1

PHY 101 General Physics I Lecture 3

PHY 101 General Physics I Laboratory 1

PHY 102 General Physics II Lecture 3

PHY 102 General Physics II Laboratory 1

PSY 301 Developmental Psychology 3

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology 3

BIO 259 Medical Terminology 2

HPE 481 Internship in Health and Exercise Science 5

____

Concentration Total 29

Electives 4

____

Degree Total 128.5

Presports Medicine Concentration (PSMC)

BIO 111 Introductory Biology I Lecture 3

BIO 111L Introductory Biology I Laboratory 1

BIO 112 Introductory Biology II Lecture 3

BIO 112L Introductory Biology II Laboratory 1

CHE 112 General Chemistry II Lecture 3

CHE 112L General Chemistry II Laboratory 1

CHE 211 Organic Chemistry I Lecture 3

CHE 211L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory 1

CHE 212 Organic Chemistry II Lecture 3

CHE 212L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory 1

PHY 101 General Physics I Lecture 3

PHY 101L General Physics I Laboratory 1

PHY 102 General Physics II Lecture 3

PHY 102L General Physics II Laboratory 1

HLSS 481 Internship in Health and Exercise Science 5

____

Concentration Total 33

____

Degree Total 129.5

  

Leisure Science Major (LS) Bachelor of Science

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science (two lectures and labs) 8

Mathematics (MAT 151) 3

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315)

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244)

Health and Physical Education 4.5

(Health Fitness I and II, swimming course or proficiency and five activity courses)

____

General Education Total 55.5

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

Major

HLSS 202 Introduction to Leisure Services 3

HLSS 233 Safety and First Aid 3

HLSS 306 Sport Facility and Event Management 3

HLSS 315 Organization and Administration of Programs 3

HLSS 331 Outdoor Leisure and Camps 3

HLSS 343 Leadership in Sports and Leisure 3

HLSS 344 Programming in Sport and Leisure 3

HLSS 416 Legal and Ethical Aspects of Sport and Leisure 3

HLSS 482 Internship in Leisure Science 5

HLSS 499 Senior Paper/Project 3

Choice of six of the following courses: 12

HLSS 228 Theory of Coaching (2 hrs.)

HLSS 318 Psychology of Human Performance (3 hrs.)

HLSS 353 Theory/Analysis of Teaching Soccer and Volleyball (2 hrs.)

HLSS 354 Theory /Analysis of Teaching Track and Field (2 hrs.) and Weight Training

HLSS 356 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Aquatics (2 hrs.)

HLSS 357 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Football and (2 hrs.) Badminton

HLSS 358 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Golf (2 hrs.)

HLSS 359 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Tennis and (2 hrs.) Pickleball

HLSS 360 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Softball and (2 hrs.) Basketball

____

Major Total 44

Cognate

CSC 112 Microcomputer Application in Business 3

HLSS 375 Global Perspectives in Leisure and Sports 3 Management

____

Cognate Total 6

Minor and/or Electives 23

____

Degree Total 128.5

  

Sports Management Major (SMGT) Bachelor of Science

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Laboratory Science (two lectures and labs) 8

Mathematics (MAT 151 or MAT 232) 3

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315)

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244)

Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 4.5

(Health Fitness I and II, swimming course or proficiency and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 55.5

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

Major

HLSS 206 Introduction to Sports Management 3

HLSS 233 Safety and First Aid 3

HLSS 306 Sports Facility and Event Management 3

HLSS 315 Organization and Administration of Programs 3

HLSS 318 Psychology of Human Performance 3

HLSS 343 Leadership in Sport and Leisure Science 3

HLSS 375 Global Perspectives in Leisure  and Sport Science 3

HLSS 416 Legal and Ethical Aspects of Sport and Leisure 3

HLSS 483 Internship in Sports Management 3

HLSS 499 Senior Paper/Project 3

____

Major Total 30

Note: Students majoring in sports managment need to choose one of the following concentrations.

Sports Administration Concentration (ADMC)

ACT 215 Principles of Financial Accounting I 3

ACT 216 Principles of Managerial Accounting II 3

BUS 325 Business Law I 3

FIN 338 Financial Management 3

MGT 130 Principles of Management 3

MKT 130 Principles of Marketing 3

____

Concentration Total 18

Minor and/or Electives* 25

____

Degree Total 128.5

Sports Broadcasting Concentration (BRC)

JRN 107 Newswriting I 3

JRN 108 Newswriting I Lab 1

JRN 214 Workshop: Newspaper 1

JRN 321 Media Law and Ethics 3

TVF 231 Principles of TV Production 3

TVF 332 Field Production and Editing 3

TVF 128 Principles of Audio Production 3

Choice of one of the following workshops: 1

JRN 215 Workshop: Broadcast News/ Anchoring

TVF 218 Workshop: KORU

____

Concentration Total 18

Minor and/or Electives* 25

____

Degree Total 128.5

Sports Operations Concentration (OPC)

Choice of six of the following courses: 18

HLSS 202 Introduction to Leisure Services

HLSS 344 Programming in Sport and Leisure

HLSS 451 Directed Study in Sports Managment

MGT 130 Principles of Management

MKT 130 Principles of Marketing

MKT 361 International Marketing

BUS 201 Principles of Economics

BUS 361 International Business

BUS 372 Business Ethics

____

Concentration Total 18

Minor and/or Electives* 25

____

Degree Total 128.5

Sports Sales and Marketing Concentration (SMC)

MKT 130 Principles of Marketing 3

Choice of five of the following courses: 15

ADV 211 Workshop: Advertising

ADV 421 Media Buying and Selling

COM 410 Conference Leadership/Event Planning

MKT 334 Promotional Management

MKT 346 Personal Selling

MKT 361 International Marketing

____

Concentration Total 18

Minor and/or Electives* 25

____

Degree Total 128.5

  

Health and Physical Education Major (HPE) with K-12 Teaching Licensure Bachelor of Science

Students may earn licensure in a second subject/content area. The Oklahoma Commission for Teacher Preparation requires the OSAT/OPTE test(s) be passed in order to obtain a license in an additional subject/content area. Students interested in completing coursework toward additional licensing should consult the subject area advisor.
General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) 1

English (COMP 102, 303) 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) 6

Theology (THE 103) 3

Physical Science (lecture and lab) 4

Biological Science (HPE 319 lecture and lab) 4

Mathematics (MAT 105) 3

American History (HIS 101) 3

American Government (GOV 101) 3

Foreign Language Proficiency (PRFL 001) 0                                 (exam or 102 level of a foreign language class)

Humanities 12

(HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315)

Social Science Elective 3

(Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244)

Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 4.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, Basic First Aid/CPR, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total 55.5

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

Major

HLSS 200 Introduction to Exercise Science and Physical Education 3

HLSS 231 Personal Health Science 3

HLSS 233 Safety and First Aid 3

HLSS 314 Motor Learning, Games, and Adaptive PE 3

HLSS 316 Kinesiology and Biomechanics 3

HLSS 320 Prevention and Care of Sports Injuries 3

HLSS 324 Exercise Physiology 3

HLSS 353 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Soccer and 2 Volleyball

HLSS 354 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Track and Field 2 and Weight Training

HLSS 357 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Football and 2 Badminton

HLSS 358 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Golf 2

HLSS 359 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Tennis and 2 Pickleball

HLSS 360 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Softball and 2 Basketball

____

Major Total 33

Note: The requirement of a senior paper/project is met by the professional education portfolio.

Professional Education

PED 100 Education Seminar (every semester) 0

Choice of one of the field-based courses: 1

PED 111 Field-Based Experience-(Elementary)

PED 121 Field-Based Experience-(Secondary)

PED 203 Foundations and Methods of Education 3

PED 222 School Health Care 1

PED 305 Pedagogy I 4

PED 306 Pedagogy II 4

PED 361 Prof Education Seminar/Portfolio 0

HLSS 452 HPE Methods and Evaluation 3

PED 475 Intern/Student Teaching: Elementary 5

PED 495 Intern/Student Teaching: 10-12 5

____

Professional Education Total 26

Electives 14

____

Degree Total 128.5

  

Health and Exercise Science Minor (HESM)

This program is designed for students majoring in another discipline and who desire a minor in health promotion and applied exercise physiology.

HLSS 233 Safety and First Aid 3

HLSS 316 Kinesiology and Biomechanics 3

HLSS 319 Applied Anatomy and Physiology 4

HLSS 324 Exercise Physiology 3

HLSS 412 Techniques of Health Fitness 3

Evaluation HLSS Electives (upper division) 2

____

Minor Total 18

leisure science Minor (lsm)

HLSS 202 Introduction to Leisure Services 3

HLSS 315 Organization and Administration of 3

Programs

HLSS 331 Outdoor Leisure and Camps 3

HLSS 343 Leadership in Sports and Leisure 3

Services

HLSS 344 Recreation Programming 3

HLSS Electives (upper division) 3

____

Minor Total 18

Sports Management Minor (SMAM)

HLSS 206 Introduction to Sports Management 3

HLSS 306 Sports Facility and Event 3 Management

HLSS 315 Organization and Administration of 3 Programs

HLSS 318 Psychology of Sport 2

HLSS 343 Leadership in Sports and Leisure 3 Services

HLSS 416 Legal and Ethical Aspects of Sport and Leisure 2

HLSS Upper Division Elective 2

____

Minor Total 18

  

Departmental Courses

Descriptions of the courses listed below are in the section titled Course Descriptions at the end of this catalog. Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order by the prefix.

Health and Physical Education

HPE 001 Health Fitness I

HPE 002 Health Fitness II

 

Physical Activity Courses

HPE 003 Total Conditioning

HPE 005 Fitness Club

HPE 007 Basic First Aid and CPR and Fitness

HPE 012 Bowling and Fitness

HPE 016 Beginning Badminton and Fitness

HPE 017 Advanced Badminton and Fitness

HPE 020 Beginning Golf and Fitness

HPE 021 Advanced Golf and Fitness

HPE 024 Intermediate Swimming and Fitness

HPE 025 Aquatic Exercises

HPE 026 Beginning Swimming and Fitness

HPE 027 Swim Conditioning

HPE 028 Beginning Tennis and Fitness

HPE 029 Intermediate/Advanced Tennis and Fitness

HPE 030 Weight Training and Fitness

HPE 031 Advanced Weight Training and Fitness

HPE 036 Scuba and Fitness

HPE 037 Scuba Rescue and Fitness

HPE 038 Scuba Open Water and Fitness

HPE 039 Scuba Master Diver and Fitness

HPE 040 Advanced Scuba and Fitness

HPE 042 Creative Aerobics and Fitness

HPE 044 Step Aerobics and Fitness

HPE 045 Pilates for Christians and Fitness

HPE 046 Equestrian and Fitness

HPE 047 Intermediate Equestrian and Fitness

HPE 051 Volleyball and Fitness

HPE 053 Intermediate/Advanced Volleyball and Fitness

HPE 054 Racquetball and Fitness

HPE 080 Adaptive Physical Education and Fitness

HPE 084 Self-Defense and Fitness

HPE 092 Exercise and Weight Control

HPE 093 Body Sculpting and Fitness

HPE 095 Beginning Mountain Biking and Fitness

HPE 096 Intermediate/Advanced Mountain Biking and Fitness

HPE 097 Backpacking and Fitness

HPE 098 Triathlon Training

HPE 099 Aerobics Proficiency

HPE 100 Walk for Fitness

HPE 101 Fitness for Life I

HPE 102 Fitness for Life II

HPE 124 Lifeguarding and Fitness

Health, Leisure, and Sport Sciences

HLSS 200 Introduction to Exercise Science

HLSS 202 Introduction to Leisure Services

HLSS 206 Introduction to Sports Management

HLSS 228 Theory of Coaching

HLSS 231 Personal Health Science

HLSS 233 Safety and First Aid

HLSS 306 Sports Facility and Event Management

HLSS 314 Motor Learning, Games, and Adaptive PE

HLSS 315 Organization and Administration of Programs

HLSS 316 Kinesiology and Biomechanics

HLSS 318 Psychology of Human Performance

HLSS 319 Applied Anatomy and Physiology

HLSS 320 Prevention and Care of Sports Injuries

HLSS 324 Exercise Physiology

HLSS 331 Outdoor Leisure and Camps

HLSS 343 Leadership in Sports and Leisure Services

HLSS 344 Programming in Sport and Leisure

HLSS 353 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Soccer/Volleyball

HLSS 354 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Track and Field/Weight Training

HLSS 356 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Aquatics

HLSS 357 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Football/Badminton

HLSS 358 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Golf

HLSS 359 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Tennis/Pickleball

HLSS 360 Theory and Analysis of Teaching Softball/Basketball

HLSS 375 Global Perspectives in Sport and Leisure

HLSS 402 Exercise Prescription for Special Populations

HLSS 412 Techniques of Health Fitness Evaluation

HLSS 416 Legal and Ethical Aspects of Sport and Leisure

HLSS 451 Directed Study

HLSS 452 HPE Methods and Evaluation

HLSS 481 Internship in Health and Exercise Science

HLSS 482 Internship in Leisure Science

HLSS 483 Internship in Sports Management

HLSS 499 Senior Paper/Project

HLSS 999 Elective

Graduate Health and Physical Education

GHPE 503 Graduate Health Fitness

GHPE 703 Graduate Health Fitness

GHPE 515 Graduate Aerobics

GHPE 715 Graduate Aerobics

GHPE 525 Graduate Walk for Fitness

GHPE 725 Graduate Walk for Fitness

GHPE 999 Elective

 

Varsity

HPE 034 Varsity Cheerleading and Fitness

HPE 070 Varsity Basketball

HPE 071 Varsity Tennis

HPE 072 Varsity Baseball

HPE 073 Varsity Golf

HPE 075 Varsity Track and Field

HPE 076 Varsity Volleyball

HPE 079 Varsity Soccer

 

Proficiencies

PRFH 007 First Aid and CPR Proficiency

PRFH 070 Swimming Proficiency