College of Arts and Cultural Studies

Mark R. Hall, Ph.D., Dean

MISSION STATEMENT:

The College of Arts and Cultural Studies seeks to develop Christian persons of integrity who demonstrate ethical behavior and a passion for aesthetics. We nurture students to synthesize and integrate knowledge and to enthusiastically communicate God’s Truth. By the effective stewardship and expression of their unique gifts, students will become agents of the healing and transformation of our diverse world. We foster the appreciation of the expanded world of the arts, thereby continuing the heritage of the good, the true, and the beautiful.

 

Faculty

Joann Furlow Allen

Associate Professor of English

B.A., University of Oklahoma, 1976; M.A., University of Tulsa, 1979; Ph.D., 2004.

Rafael Barreiro

Assistant Professor of Media

B.A., Hamline University; 1994; B.A., 1996; M.F.A., Regent University, 2011.

Dafne Basave

Assistant Professor of Theatre

B.S., Oral Roberts University; M.F.A., University of Houston, 2011.

U. S. “Sonny” Branham

Assistant Professor of Government

B.A., Western Kentucky University, 1971; M.A., 1973.

Joyce M. Bridgman

Assistant Professor of Music

B.Mus., Phillips University, 1965; M.Mus., University of Kansas, 1966.

Christopher Brown

Assistant Professor of Music

B.M., University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, 1986; M.S., Abilene Christian University, 1992; M.M., University of Oklahoma, 2006.

Fleta Buckles

Instructor of Humanities

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1974; M.A., University of Tulsa, 1991.

Carlos Chale

Instructor of Spanish

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1992; M.A., 1993.

T. Mandel Chenweth

Instructor of Art Education

B.F.A., University of Tulsa, 1981; M.F.A., 1991.

Evan A. Culp

Professor of Media

B.S., Florida State University, 1974; M.S., 1975; Ed.D., University of Tulsa, 1987.

 

Michelle Eiler

Assistant Professor of Music

B.M., Brandon University, 2007; M.M., 2008; M.M., University of Oklahoma, 2015;, D.M.A., 2014.

William Curtis Ellis

Professor of Political Science and Chair of the History, Humanities and Government Department

B.A., Randoph-Macon College, 2004; M.A.,University of Oklahoma, 2008; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, 2010.

 
William R. Epperson

Professor of English 

B.A., Eastern New Mexico University, 1961; M.A., University of Kansas, 1963; Ph.D., 1965.

 

 

Agena Farmer

Assistant Professor of Communication

B.S., Southwest Missouri State University, 1978; M.S., 1981; Ed.D., Oral Roberts University, 2003.

 
David Farnsworth

Instructor of Spanish and Inerim Chair of the English and Modern Languages Department.

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1994; M.A., 2000.

 

 

CRISTI FREUDENRICH

Assistant Professor of Media

B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1985; M.S., 2004.

 

 

Michael Fulton

Associate Professor of Spanish

B.A., Washington State University, 1991; M.A., University of Arizona, 1993; Ph.D., 1999.

Rhonda Gallagher

Assistant Professor of Communication, Arts, and Media

B.S., Southwest Missouri State University, 1979; M.S., Oklahoma State University, 2002. 

 

 

Beverly Garrison

Assistant Professor of History

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1974; M.A., University of Tulsa, 1976.

 

Keith Gogan

Assistant Professor of English

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1987; M.A., 1994.

 

 

Solomon Hailu

Associate Professor of International Community Development

B.A., Addis Ababa University, 1996; M.A., Natal University, 1998; Ph.D., 2002.

 

 

Mark R. Hall

Professor of English and Dean of the College of Arts and Cultural Studies

B.S.E., Central Missouri State University, 1981; M.S.E., 1982; Ed.S., 1984; M.A., Oral Roberts University, 1989; M.A., 1995; Ph.D., University of Tulsa, 2000.

 

 

 

H. Jerome Hatley

Professor of Music

B.M.E., Northeastern Oklahoma State University, 1976; M.M., Louisiana State University, 1978; D.M.A., University of Miami, 1984.

 

 
Laura L. Holland

Professor of Theatre and Chair of the Theatre, Drama, and Visual Arts Department

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1974; M.F.A., University of Oklahoma, 1977.

 

 

Jason Howell

Assistant Professor of Art

B.F.A., Oklahoma State University, 1997; M.F.A., University of Oklahoma, 2001.

 

 

John Jenkins

Assistant Professor of Music and Chair of the Music Department

B.A., Mercer University, 2005; M.M., University of Florida, 2007.; D.M.A., University of Missouri, 2012.

 

 
Katherine Kelley

Associate Professor of Communication and Chair of the Communication and Media Department

B.A., University of Oklahoma, 2000; M.A., Pepperdine, 2002; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma, 2011. 

 

Gary L. Kern

Instructor of Humanities

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1981; M.A., 1988.

 

 

Jiwon Kim

Assistant Professor of Art

B.F.A., Western Illinois University, 2003; M.A., Savannah College of Art and Design, 2009; M.F.A., 2009.

 

 

Laura Krohn

Instructor of English

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1984; M.A., Northeastern State University, 2009.

Mark Labash

Assistant Professor of Media

B.S., Oral Roberts University, 1974; M.S., Oklahoma State University, 1976.

 

 

Barbara Law

Assistant Professor of English

B.A., William Smith College, 1974; M.A., Rochester University, 1980.

 

 

Ruby Libertus

Assistant Professor of International Relations

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1995; M.A., 1998; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University, 2003.

 

Hayoung Lim

Assistant Professor of Music

B.M., The Catholic University, Seoul, South Korea, 1998; M.M., (cello) Illinois State University, 2000; M.M., (music therapy), 2001; Ph.D., University of Miiami, 2007.

 

 

Susan McMurray

Assistant Professor of Communication

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1991; M.A., Oklahoma State University, 1996.

Denise Miller

Assistant Professor of Communication Arts

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1981; M.A., 2002.

 
M. Lenore Mullican

Assistant Professor of Hebrew

B.S.N., Oklahoma University, 1967; M.A., Oral Roberts University, 1993.

 

 

 
Nathan Elijah Opp

Associate Professor of Art

B.S., Biola University, 1997; M.S., Pratt Institute, 1999; M.F.A., University of Tulsa, 2005.

 

 

Felipe G. Ornelas

Instructor of Humanities

B.S., Oral Roberts University, 1997; M.A., 2009.

 

 

 
Gary Pranger

Associate Professor of History and Humanities

B.S., Illinois State University, 1975; M.S., 1980; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1987.

 

 
Chris Putman

Assistant Professor of Media

B.A., Northeastern State University, 1996; M.S., 1997.

 

 

Scott Quant

Associate Professor of Music

B.M.E., Oral Roberts University, 1988; M.M.E., University of Rochester, 1992; Ph.D., University of Arizona, 1999.

 

 
Linda Royall

Instructor of Journalism

B.A Regent University, 2007; M.P.S., Georgetown University, 2009; Ph.D., Regent University, 2017.

 

 

COURTNEAY SANDERS

Associate Professor of Theatre

B.S., Oral Roberts Univesity, 2002; M.F.A., University of Arkansas, 2006.

 
Christina Schneider

Assistant Professor and Direcor of Dance

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 2011; M.F.A., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 2016.

 

 

 
John Swails, III

Professor of History

B.A., University of Georgia, 1969; M.A., 1972; M.A. Brandeis University, 1975; Ph.D., University of Georgia, 1983.

 

 
 
Paul S. Vickery

Professor of History

B.A., Florida State, 1969; M.A., 1970; M.Div., Oral Roberts University, 1989; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University, 1996.

 

 

 
Vicki Walker

Assistant Professor of Music

B.M.E., Oral Roberts University, 1985 M.M., University of Oklahoma, 1988.

 
Tim Waters

Professor of Music

B.M., Furman University, 1987; M.M.Ed., University of Georgia, 1990; D.M.A., 1999.

 
Daniel Williams

Associate Professor of Technical Theatre

B.F.A. Tarkio College, 1988; M.F.A. South llinois University-Carbondale, 1994.

 
Charles J. Zwick, Jr.

Assistant Professor of Media

B.A., Oral Roberts University, 1971; M.A., Texas Tech University, 1979.

 

 

 

     
 
 
 

 

 

Emeriti Faculty

Stuart Branston

1985-2011

Brenda Calderon

1972-2012

Dr. Evelyn Davis

1965-1980

Donald Eland

1977-2014

dr. LINDA C. GRAY

1975-2017

Dr. Dean Helland

1990-2013

Christiane Hill

1983-2013

Douglas Latta

1983-2007

Carole Lewandowski

1968-2005

Dr. Ray Lewandowski

1966-2005

DR. EDWARD A. PIERCE.

1973-2017

DR. DAVID ROBBINS

1968-2003

DR. BARBARA SILVERS

1968-2003

 

 

 

 

communication and media department

Katherine Kelley, Ph.D., Chair

MISSION STATEMENT: The mission of the Communication and Media Department (CMD) is to develop Spirit-empowered, competent, and ethical communication professionals in media, interpersonal, organizational, educational, and public environments.

OVERVIEW: 

Courses in the Communication and Media Department are designed for students desiring (1) general cultural background in communication and media; (2) a strong foundation for graduate work; (3) foundational preparation for a career in the media; (4) certification for teaching, and (5) ancillary preparation for communication-related careers such as the ministry, law, politics, public relations, sales management, and various areas of human resources development.

The departments offers programs for students interested in journalism, media, cinema, teaching speech and numerous other academic fields.

   

Degree Programs

The Communication and Media Department offers 5 majors and 5 minors.

 

Communication (B.A. and B.S.)

The communication major purposes to (1) develop skills in interviewing, listening, public speaking, problem solving, conference leadership, seminar development, systems analysis, and in-house communication consulting; (2) provide a base for a broad range of career opportunities in human communications, which focus on human resource development, organizational development, communication management, public relations, and sales; and (3) prepare students for study in speech communication, interpersonal or organizational communication management, and human resource development graduate programs. This degree can be completed in three years by following the degree-in-three plan sheet. More information is available from the Communication, Arts, and Media Department.

 

Cinema/Television/Digital Media (B.S.)

This program examines mass media in popular culture focusing on the industries of film, television, and interactive media. Media is an ever-changing language that can reflect our culture but also construct and reshape it. New technologies continually impact our ability to capture, express, and share stories through different digital venues. This major focuses on the study of the language of film and storytelling while developing the skill sets of digital movie-making, scripting, lighting, videography, sound capture, foley, audio mixing, visual editing, and effects. The media immersive junior and senior years encourage students to develop needed skills while pursuing their passion with diligence.

 

Convergence Journalism (B.S.)

Students in this program are taught hands-on best practices news-based journalism targeted for delivery across all media platforms including newspapers, magazine, radio, TV, film documentary, digital/social and Internet media. Taught from a global perspective, this interactive program provides opportunities for students to experience all genres of neews media, including investigative reporting, political reporting, Internet journalism, features writing and producing, convergence newswriting and production, radio narrarives (NPR), fim documentary, all medium news and commentary, TV/radio news broadcast announcing and producing, and photo journalism, as well as team produced intercultural advocacy and peace journalism experiences within the journalism capstone. Media workshops in newspaper, magazine, TV and radio are also offered for hands-on news media experiences. Field journalism offered as an elective includes inercultural study abroad and missions opportunities asd well as domestic cultural/political studies. Students graduating from this program are well prepared to enter najor market news media and make a difference in the world.

 

public relations and Advertising (B.S.)

Students choosing this major engage in theory, industry best practices, hands-on learning and client projects which help hone their God-given gifts and realize their dreams through interdisciplinary courses in:

Communication: Students learn to write journalistically and persuasively across media platforms; they develop a confident, professional voice for interpersonal communication and larger group communications;

Business: Students conduct their own research, analyze data for insights, and make client marketing strategy recommendations;

Creativity: Students build a design portfolio to showcase their creative skills across publications, websites, videos, photography and branding pojects;

Technology: Students demonstrate proficiency in the latest digital tools and applications and apply these through digital design, event management and across client projects.

 A required internship gives each student professional experience prior to graduation. Many graduates become communication, development or marketing directors in for-profit and non-profit organizations. Some students choose positions in public affairs, working as lobbyists or for non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Some pursue sales or event planning, while others prefer content development and social media management. Many students seek positions as media planners, creative designers, research analysts and account managers in regional, national and internationals advertising and public relations firms.

 

Teaching Licensure

The Communication and Media Department offers two options for students wanting to teach: (1) completion of the communication arts education major for secondary teaching licensure or (2) completion of another major in the Communication and Media Department, which can lead to alternative certification. As alternative certification is intended for those seeking career changes, requirements vary widely from state to state, and laws governing these programs can change frequently. Therefore, students interested in pursuing alternative certification need to meet with the ORU College of Education’s certification officer to ensure they are well informed prior to choosing this option. Students pursuing alternative certification need to check with the State Department of Education from any state in which they plan to teach in order to ensure they meet specific requirements for that state’s alternative certification.

A cooperative liaison is maintained throughout the program by the Communication and Media Department and the ORU College of Education. For this reason, it is important that all students interested in teaching identify themselves to both this department and the College of Education as soon as possible.

 

Communication Arts Education (B.A.)

This major is for students planning to teach speech, journalism, and drama in middle and high school. The major meets licensure standards for the State of Oklahoma and is offered in cooperation with the ORU College of Education. Students interested in this major should work with both the advisor in this department and with the College of Education.

 


Minors

The Communication, Arts, and Media Department also offers the following minors: human resources development, media, journalism, communication and public relations and advertising.

 

Clubs and Organizations

 

Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) is geared toward professionals and students interested in personnel and human resources.

American Society for Training and Development is an international organization dedicated to improving and enhancing learning in the workplace for students and professionals.

 

Special Activities and Opportunities
  • Students have opportunity to display their talents by involving themselves in on- and off-campus activities. Some of these activities include the following:
      • The Perihelion--the campus yearbook
      • The Oracle--the campus newspaper
      • Campus TV news--produced weekly
      • KORU--the campus radio station (streamlining with the Internet--both English and Hispanic stations)
  • Professional internships-juniors and seniors are required to successfully complete one professional internship. The internship runs the course of one semester (fall, spring or summer). A second internship may be taken for three credit hours of elective credit.
  • The American Advertising Federation's Most Promising Multicultural Students program allows students at the top of their class who passionately demonstrate their potential for future success in the industry through internships, leadership activities, community service, innovation and creativity. Students who apply must be  ORU AAF  members in good standing, have a high GPA and complete the application process. Students chosen for this national award are flown to New York City for four days of professional development workshops, agency visits and a recruitment expo.
  • Study Abroad-Students many complete a semester remotely or abroad. Interested students should visit with the faculty advisor.
  • The Communique and Oracle-Students may build their portfolios by writing for the department's alumni social media magazine or as a writer, designer or sales representative for the Oracle, ORU's bi-weekly student newspaper.
  • Students explore inductry careers with on-campus and virtual speakers, field trips and through regional and national conference attendance.
  • Students may choose to build their resumes on campus through work-study positions in areas such as sports marketing, event management, publications writing and designing, advertising sales, digital marketing, non-profit development, student leadership, social media and video storytelling.

 

National student advertising Competition

Students who are second-semester seniors are encouraged to apply for ORU's National Student Advertising Competion team hosted by the American Advertising Federation. The competion begins in August with the client providing a detailed case problem. Students form a working advertising agency and build a comprehensive national compaign which includes a 26-page plans books and 20-minute agency presentation. The presentation is made by the team to the client and other national agency executive judges at the district conference in April. Winning teams advance to the semi-final round and eight are chosen as national conference presenters. Students serving on the AAF team must be members of the ORU AAF chapter and meet a minimum GPA requirement. Through successful participation, students earn six credit hours toward their degree program (three in the fall and three in the spring). Many students use their participation on the NSAC team to make national agency connections and apply to elite graduate programs.

 

Awards and Scholarships
  • Outstanding Senior Paper—awarded to the graduating senior having the best senior paper within the department.
  • Thomas C. Durfey Outstanding Senior Award—awarded to the top graduating senior in each major program within the department..
  • Lesher Scholarship—available to convergence journalism majors in the fall semester.

  

Convergence Journalism Major (CJRN) Bachelor of Science

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303)  - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (lecture and lab) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103

DRAM 215** or ART 103** or ART 104** or TVF 317**

Choice of one of the following :HUM 222, 233, 244, 260, 333; COMP 101 or MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244.

Health and Physical Education - 7

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 58

**A grade of “C” or above is required.

Major

CAM 451 Communications Internship - 3

JRN 101  Introduction to Journalism - 3

JRN 107 Newswriting I - 3

JRN 108 Newswriting I Lab - 1

JRN 207 Convergence Journalism - 3

JRN 222 Digital Journalism - 3

JRN 255 News Editing - 3

JRN 344 Feature Writing and Producing - 3

JRN 355 Field Journalism - 3

JRN 417 Investigative Reporting - 3

JRN 455 Journalism Capstone - 3

JRN 499 Senior Research Project - 3

Choice of one of the following workshops - 1

JRN 215 Workshop: News Anchoring

TVF 216 Workshop: News Production

____

Major Total - 35

Cognate

ART 365 Digital Photography - 3

JRN 321  Media Law and Ethics - 3

INT 101 Digital Composition - 3

INT 200 Interactive Media and Web Design - 3

TVF 128 Principles of Audio Production - 3

TVF 231 Principles of Television Production - 3

TVF 332 Field Production and Editing - 3

TVF 408 Broadcast News - 3

TVF 457 Advanced Field Production - 3

Choice of one of the following: - 3

TVF 345 Announcing

TVF 349 Advanced TV Production

JRN 214, JRN 215, PRP 213, TVF 216 or TVF 218 (choose three one hour workshops from this list)

____

Cognate Total - 30

Elective Hours Total - 7

____

Degree Total - 130

  

public relations and Advertising Major (prad) Bachelor of Science

General Education 

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (lecture and lab) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103

ART 103** or ART 104** or TVF 317**

Choice of two of the following : HUM 222, 233, 244, 260, 270, 333; COMP 101 or MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244.

Health and Physical Education - 7

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 58

Major

ADV 216 Advertising Fundamentals and Design - 3

ADV 221 Branding, Promotions and Storytelling - 3

ADV 320 Communications Research - 3

ADV 421 Media Planning - 3

ADV 499 Senior Research Project - 3

CAM 451 Communications Internship - 3

JRN 321 Media Law and Ethics - 3

PRP 213 Publications Workshop - 2

PRP 225 Prin of Public Relations and Engaging Media - 3

PRP 327 Social Media Management - 3

PRP 428 Public Relations Case Studies - 3

____

Major Total - 32

Communcations Cognate

COM 302 Advanced Public Speaking - 3

COM 410 Conference Leadership/Event Planning - 3

____

Cognate Total 6

 
Journalism Cognate

JRN 107 Newswriting I - 3

JRN 108 Newswriting I Lab - 1

MMC 104 Media and Pop Culture - 3

____

Cognate Total 7

 
production COGNATE

ART 365 Digital Photography - 3

INT 101 Digital Composition - 3

INT 200 Interactive Media and Web Design - 3

TVF 332 Field Production and Editing - 3

____

Cognate Total - 12

Elective Hours Total - 13

____

Degree Total - 128

   

Cinema/Television/Digital Media Majorv(CTD) Bachelor of Science

General Education 

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (lecture and lab, PSC 103 required) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History 101 - 3

Government 101 - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103

ART 103** or ART 104** or ART 307** or DRAM 215** or TVF 317**

Choice of two of the following : HUM 222, 233, 244, 260, 333; COMP 101 or MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244.

Health and Physical Education - 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 56


**A grade of "C" or higher must be nearned in there classes.

Major

INT 200 Interactive Media & Web Design - 3

TVF 128 Principles of Audio Production - 3

TVF 231 Principles of TV Production - 3

TVF 233 Production Software - 3

TVF 312 Advanced Audio - 3

TVF 318 Fundamentals of Scriptwriting - 3

TVF 329 Advanced TV Production - 3

TVF 332 Field Production and Editing - 3

TVF 337 Film Directing and Producing - 3

TVF 355 Advanced Film Directing - 3

TVF 457 Advanced Field Production - 3

TVF 477 Production House - 3

TVF 499 Senior Research Project - 3

____

Major Total - 39

Cinema/TV Cognate

CAM 451 Communications Internship - 3

INT 101 Digital Compostion - 3

MMC 104 Media and Pop Culture - 3

TVF 216 Production Experiences - 3

TVF 305 Visual Media Industries - 3

TVF 313 Lighting for TV/Film - 3

TVF 325 Cinematography - 3

TVF 314 Media Operations - 3

____

Cognate Total - 24

Elective Credist Total - 9

____

Degree Total - 128

  

MultiMedia Institute

Students apply for entrance into this selective program during their sophomore year. Acceptance into the program is limited and based on admission to the MultiMedia Institute, which includes (but is not limited to) the following criteria: (1) performance in previous production courses; (2) evaluation by previous media professors; (3) previous class attendance, participation, and academic performance; (4) the student’s entrance essay and interview; (5) the student’s professional goals; and (6) willingness to commit to the discipline and schedule of the program. Students not selected to the MultiMedia Institute are required to choose a new program of study or major. Students who transfer into ORU or who declare this area of concentration after 32 credit hours of college work may be required to spend additional semesters to complete this concentration.

Oral Roberts University has always been a leader in technology. The MultiMedia Institute positions ORU at the forefront in new technology. The Institute is composed of media professionals and faculty from the Communication and Media Department.

Students participating in the MultiMedia Institute during their junior year receive intense (40 hours per week) hands-on experience over two semesters. Students develop competencies working on practical and creative projects. These projects include audio, film, video production. There is a one-time fee to cover the cost (approximately $900) to cover long-distance field trips.

Students are taught by faculty as well as industry professionals. Programs students produce may be educational, entertainment, or instructional in nature. More information is available from the Director of the MultiMedia Institute.

  

Communication Major (COMN) Bachelor of Arts and bachelor of science

General Education 

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Foreign language (2 semesters including 203)** - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101 or COM 400) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (lecture and lab) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History 101 - 3

Government 101 - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, BUS 201, FIN 244, SOC 323)

Health and Physical Education - 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 62

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses marked with asterisks.

**Students pursuing thhe Bachelor of Science (COMN-BS) complete one additional science lecture and lab and MAT 232 in lieu of a foreign language.

Major

COM 203 Interpersonal Communication - 3

COM 251 Communication Seminar - 1

COM 300 Organizational Communication  - 3

COM 302 Advanced Public Speaking - 3

COM 309 Argumentation and Persuasion - 3

COM 342 Communication Theory - 3

COM 499 Research and Senior Paper/Project - 3

Choice of one of the following three courses - 3

COM 410 Conference Leadership/Event Planning

COM 412 Training and Development

COM 446 Business and Professional Speech

Choice of three of the following courses - 9

COM 322 Interviewing

COM 400 Debate and Forensics Team

COM 409 Gender and Family Communication

COM 410 Discussion and Conference Leadership

COM 412 Training and Development

COM 425 Inercultural Communication

COM 444 Advanced Interpersonal Communication

COM 446 Business and Professional Speech

CAM 451 Communications Internship

____

Major Total - 31

Minor - 18

Elective credits - 17

____

Degree Total - 128

  

Communication Arts Education Major (CAE) with Secondary School Teaching Licensure Bachelor of Arts

Students preparing to teach communication arts (e.g., speech and debate) in the secondary schools (middle and high school grades) achieve a major in communication arts. Secondary school teaching areas in speech communication include drama, debate, forensics, general speech, and combined areas.

Students may earn licensure in a second subject/ content area. The Oklahoma Commission for Teacher Preparation requires the OSAT/OPTE test(s) be passed in order to obtain a license in an additional subject/content area. Students interested in completing coursework toward additional licensing should consult the subject area advisor.

General Education 

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Biology (lecture and lab) - 4

Physical Science (lecture and lab) - 4

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Foreign language (2 semesters including 203) - 6

Humanities - 12

HUM 103, DRAM 215, DRAM 304  plus one of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one 3 of the following: PSY 201, SOC 323, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201.

Health and Physical Education - 4.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, Basic First Aid/CPR, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 61.5

Major

COM 202 Oral Interpretation of Literature - 3

COM 309 Argumentation and Persuasion - 3

COM 400 Debate and Forensics Team - 3

DANP 107 Improvisation I - 1

DANP _____ Dance technique elective - 1

DRAM 105 Theatre Seminar - 0.5

DRAM 205 Fundamentals of Acting - 3

DRAM 216 Intro to Technical Production - 3

DRAM 305 Theatre History II - 3

DRAM 336 Directing - 3

DRAM 498 Senior Paper Preparation - 1

DRAM 499 Research and Senior Paper/Project - 2

GOV 488 Model United Nations - 1

TVF 345 Announcing - 3

Choice of one of the following courses - 3

COM 302 Advanced Public Speaking

DRAM 306 Advanced Acting

ENG 351 Shakespeare

GOV 487 Oklahoma Intercollegiate Legislature

Choice of one of the following courses - 3

DRAM 403 Costume Design

DRAM 405 Makeup Design

Choice of one of the following courses - 3

DRAM 404 Theatrical Scene Design

DRAM 233 Technical Lighting Design

Choice of one of the following courses - 3

MMC 104 Media and Pop Culture

TVF 127 Introduction to Audio Production

TVF 231 Principles of TV Production

____

Major Total - 42.5

Professional Education

PED 100 Education Seminar (every semester) - 0

PED 121 Field Based Experience/Practicum - 1 (Secondary)

PED 203 Foundations & Methods of Education - 3

PED 222 School Health Care - 1

PED 305 Pedagogy I - 4

PED 306 Pedagogy II - 4

PED 361 Professional Education Seminar/Portfolio - 0

PED 485 Intern/Student Teaching: 7-9 - 5

PED 495 Intern/Student Teaching 10-12 - 5

COM 110 Teaching Communication Arts - 3 (.5 per semester for 6 semesters)

____

Professional Education Total - 26

____

Degree Total - 130.5

   

Communication Minor (COMM)

COM 203 Interpersonal Communication - 3

COM 300 Organizational Communication - 3

COM 302 Advanced Public Speaking  - 3

COM 309 Argumentation & Persuasion: - 3 Theory and Practice

COM 342 Communication Theory - 3

COM Elective* - 3

____

Minor Total - 18

*With approval of a communication advisor

Fine Arts Technology Minor (FATM)

Students choose a total of 18 hours, nine from each of two areas. At least one course from each area must be 300 or 400 level.

Art

Choice of three of the following courses - 9

ART 101 Fundamentals of Art

ART 102 Fundamentals of Art II

ART 213 Drawing

ART 218 Graphic Design I

ART 365 Digital Photography

___

Art Total - 9

Music

MUS 300 Music Appreciation - 3

Choice of two hrs. from the following courses - 2

MUS 061/089 Performance Groups 

MUS 001/025 Applied Music

MUS 131 Class Voice

MUS 135 Class Guitar

Choice of four hrs. from the following courses - 4

MUS 105 Introduction to Music Technology

MUS 313 Sequencing and Digital Audio

MUS 315 Music Rich Media

CHIL 400 Introduction to Sound Reinforcement

CHIL 401 Studio Recording & Music Production I 

CHIL 402 Studio Recording  & Music Production II 

CHIL 403 Recording Studio Maintenance

CHIL 404 Advanced Studio Recording

CHIL 405 New Technology Audio Production

___

Music Total - 9

___

Minor Total - 18

  

Human Resources Development Minor (HRM/HRNM)

This minor has two tracks, depending on whether or not the student is a communication major.
For communication majors (HRM)

COM 412 Training and Development - 3

COM 446 Business and Professional Speech - 3

MGT 130 Principles of Management - 3

MGT 352 Organizational Behavior - 3

MGT 353 Human Resources Management - 3

COM Elective - 3

____

Minor Total - 18

For students not majoring in communication (HRNM)

COM 300 Organizational Communication - 3

COM 412 Training and Development - 3

COM Elective* - 3                                                                                                                                  (or a related human resource course from psychology, sociology, or business) 

MGT 130 Principles of Management - 3

MGT 353 Human Resource Management - 3

Choice of one of the following two courses3

COM 322 Interviewing

COM 446 Business and Professional Speech

____

Minor Total - 18

*With advisor’s approval.

  

Journalism Minor (JRNM)

This minor is for students majoring outside of the Communication and Media Department. It is designed for those preparing to enter news fields and for those planning to undertake graduate study in journalism.

JRN 107 Newswriting I - 3

JRN 108 Newswriting 1 Lab - 1

JRN 205 Covergence Newswriting - 3

JRN 214 Workshop: Newspaper - 1

JRN 215 Workshop: News/Anchoring - 1

JRN 317 Investigative Reporting - 3

JRN 444 Feature Writing - 3

Choice of three hrs. from the following courses - 3

CAM 451 Communications Internship 

MMC 104 Media and Pop Culture

PRP 225 Principles of PR and Engaging Media 

TVF 408 Broadcast News

 ____

Minor Total - 18

Media Minor (MEDM)

Students choose 18 credits from at least two of the following groups:

Please review course catalog for appropriate prerequisites for each course.

GROUP I

MMC 104 Media & Pop Culture - 3
TVF 305 Visual Media Industries - 3
TVF 317 Media Analysis - 3
ADV 221 Branding, Promotions & Stroytelling - 3
JRN 321 Media Law - 3


GROUP II

JRN 107 Newswriting I (requires a lab JRN 108) - 3
JRN 207 Newswriting II - 3
JRN 317 Investigative Reporting - 3
TVF 318 Fundamentals of Scriptwriting - 3
JRN 305 News Editing - 3
JRN 444 Feature Writing - 3


GROUP III

INT 101 Digital Composition - 3
INT 200 Interactive Media & Web Design - 3
TVF 128 Principles of Audio Production - 3
TVF 231 Principles of TV Production - 3
TVF 337 Film Directing & Production - 3
TVF 332 Field Production/Editing - 3
TVF 345 Announcing - 3
CAM 451 Communications Internship - 3
___

Minor Total - 18

Public Relations and Advertising Minor (PRAM)

The public relations and advertising minor compliments many areas of study including business (e.g., marketing, management, business administration and international business), government, communication, international community development, graphic design, music, writing, psychology and theology. The coursework offers traning in journalistic-style writing, research, marketing, communications, digital design and offers elective options in upper division advertising and public relation courses.

JRN 107 Newswriting I - 3

JRN 108 Newswriting I Lab - 1

ADV 221 Branding, Promotions & Storytelling - 3

ADV 320 Communications Research - 3

PRP 213 Workshop: Publications - 2

PRP 225 Prin of PR and Engaging Media - 3

Choice of one of the following two courses - 3

ADV 421 Media Planning

PRP 428 Public Relations Case Studies

____

Minor Total - 18

 

Departmental Courses

Descriptions of the courses listed below are in the section titled Course Descriptions at the end of this catalog. Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order by the prefix.
Advertising

ADV 211 Workshop: Advertising

ADV 216 Advertising Fundamentals and Design

ADV 221 Branding, Promotions and Storytelling

ADV 320 Communication Research

ADV 421 Media Planning

ADV 499 Senior Research Project

ADV 999 Elective

Communication Arts

CAM 451 Communications Internship

CAM 453 Directed Study and Research

COM 101 Oral Communication

COM 102 Voice, Diction, and Phonetics

COM 110 Teaching Communication Arts

COM 202 Oral Interpretation of Literature

COM 498 Senior Paper Preparation

COM 499 Research and Senior Paper/Project

COM 999 Elective

 
 
Communication

COM 203 Interpersonal Communication

COM 251 Communication Seminar

COM 300 Organizational Communication

COM 302 Advanced Public Speaking

COM 309 Argumentation and Persuasion: Theory and Practice

COM 315 Forensics, Debate, and Tournament Directing

COM 322 Interviewing

COM 342 Communication Theory

COM 400 Debate and Forensics Team

COM 409 Gender and Family

COM 410 Conference Leadership/Event Planning

COM 412 Training and Development

COM 425 Intercultural Communication

COM 444 Advanced Interpersonal Communication

COM 446 Business and Professional Speech

Interactive Media

INT 101 Digital Composition

INT 200 Interactive Media/Web Design

INT 202 Introduction to 3-D and Animation

INT 211 Advanced 3-D and Animation

INT 212 Workshop: Interactive Media

INT 302 Advanced 3-D and Animation

INT 401 Advanced Interactive Media

INT 999 Elective

 
 
 

 

 
 
 
Journalism

JRN 101 Introduction to Journalism

JRN 107 Newswriting I

JRN 108 Newswriting I Lab

JRN 205 Convergence Newswriting

JRN 214 Workshop: Newspaper

JRN 215 Workshop: News/Anchoring

JRN 222 Digital Journalism

JRN 255 News Editing

JRN 321 Media Law and Ethics

JRN 332 Journalism Seminar

JRN 344 Feature Writing

JRN 355 Field Journalism

JRN 417 Investigative Reporting

JRN 455 Journalism Capstone

JRN 499 Senior Research Project

JRN 999 Elective

Mass Media Communication

MMC 104 Media and Pop Culture

MMC 489 Campaign Strategies

MMC 999 Elective

PUBLIC RELATIONS

PRP 213 Workshop: Publications

PRP 217 Workshop: Public Relations

PRP 225 Principles of Public Relations and Engaging Media

PRP 327 Social Media Management

PRP 428 Public Relations Case Studies

PRP 499 Senior Research Project

PRP 999 Elective

Television/Film

TVF 128 Principles of Audio Production

TVF 216 Workshop: Production Experiences

TVF 218 Workshop: KORU

TVF 231 Principles of TV Production

TVF 233 Production Software

TVF 305 Visual Media Industries

TVF 312 Advanced Audio Production

TVF 313 Lighting for TV/Film

TVF 314 Media Operations

TVF 317 Media Analysis

TVF 318 Fundamentals of Scriptwriting

TVF 325 Cinematography

TVF 329 Advanced Television Production

TVF 332 Field Production and Editing

TVF 337 Film Directing and Producing

TVF 345 Announcing

TVF 355 Advanced Film Directing

TVF 408 Broadcast News

TVF 447 Producing and Directing

TVF 457 Advanced Field Production and Editing

TVF 477 Production House

TVF 499 Senior Research Project

TVF 999 Elective 

 

 

 

English AND Modern languages Department

David Farnsworh, Interim Chair

MISSION STATEMENT: The English and Modern Languages Department supports the University mission by preparing students to be effective thinkers and communicators in the languages of their choice. The curriculum promotes the literary, artistic, linguistic, and cultural heritage for contemporary Christian students and encourages students to apply their commitment to Jesus Christ to the people of the target languages studied. The department aims to develop intellectually alert and socially adept graduates who are spiritually alive to the concerns of the people whose language they are studying.

Overview

Skill in language is a prerequisite in almost any occupation or profession. Familiarity with literature, as well as sound writing and speaking skills, is an essential part of a liberal arts education. Students graduating with a major in a language or in writing have a solid foundation for careers in a variety of fields. Teaching, journalism, government, law, library science, theology, and missions all require individuals with competent language skills.

  

General Education Courses

Composition Courses

All ORU students pursuing any bachelor’s degree --regardless of major--are required to pass COMP 102 and 303 or transfer equivalent courses from other universities. COMP 102 is intended to be taken during the freshman or sophomore year and is the prerequisite for COMP 303, which needs to be taken in the spring of the junior year or any semester of the senior year.

The prerequisite for COMP 102 is one of the following:

  • a SAT Verbal score of 500-630 on traditional version;
  • an ACT English score of 22-27;
  • a TOEFL score of at least 550 on the written exam;
  • completion of COMP 101 with at least a “C”; or
  • 70% on ORU placement exam (available only for students without scores or COMP 101 grades).

If a student’s SAT or ACT score in English indicates the student also needs to take COMP 101, the COMP 101 course can count for one of the humanities courses (depending on the student’s major) if the student has not already taken COMP 102.

Honors sections of the general education courses (COMP 102 and 303) are required for students with high ACT or SAT scores (ACT English score of 28 or higher or an SAT Verbal score of 640 or higher). Students who have satisfactorily passed the COMP 102 honors course need to take COMP 303 honors or substitute an upper division English course for COMP 303 requirement. Students with high SAT or ACT scores and who received AP credit for COMP 102 need to take COMP 303 Honors instead of an upper division English course.

Language Courses

All students pursuing the bachelor of arts degree (regardless of major), bachelor of music, bachelor of music education, and bachelor of social work are required to pass two semesters (six hours minimum) of the same modern foreign language, including at least the 203 level. Students with high school credit in a foreign language may take courses in either the same language or in a different language to fulfill the general education language requirement for the bachelor’s degree. However, if a student opts to take a different foreign language than the one taken in high school, he or she must still complete courses through the 203 level of the different foreign language chosen.

Although only six hours (e.g., 203 level and 204 level) of a foreign language are required in the general education portion of these bachelor’s degrees, students may use any hours beyond six general education hours (e.g., the four hours earned in the 101 level) to apply to their electives. Or, if a student takes the 102 and 203 levels (totaling seven hours) to fulfill the general education requirement, he or she can use the one hour beyond the six required for general education to count as an hour of elective credit.

A minimum grade of “C" must be achieved in a foreign language course before the next level is taken.

More information is available from the English and Modern Languages Department.

Students majoring or minoring in any of the foreign languages in this department automatically complete their bachelor of arts language requirement through completing their language major or minor. Students who place into a 203-level course and above may consider a second major or minor through the foreign language test-out program, in which students can test-out of lower level courses and receive credit toward a minor in a foreign language. Students wishing to count the following classes toward a major/minor need to enroll in the test-out classes that have section number 85.

Hebrew: 102-85, 203-85, or 204-85

French: 102-85, 203-85, or 204-85

Spanish: 102-85, 203-85, or 204-85

Chinese: 102-85, 203-85, or 204-85

German 102-85, 203-85

International students matriculating in a bachelor‘s program are generally required to meet the same entrance and degree requirements in foreign language as American students. However, students who have proof of foreign birth and citizenship, whose native language is not English, and who have studied academically for four years at the high school level in their native language meet the entrance and degree foreign language requirements.

Degree Programs

The English and Modern Languages Department offers majors in English literature, French, Spanish, Modern Foreign Language Education (K-12), English Education (middle and high school), and writing. Students majoring in English literature, French, or Spanish need to declare a minor. Students majoring in modern foreign language education, English education, and writing do not need to declare a minor. However, students majoring in writing need to complete a concentration (12 hours) in journalism or English literature.

The curriculum for every major program in the English and Modern Languages Department includes a career preparation component. The English Education major and the Modern Foreign Languages Education major have career assessment interviews in the sophomore and senior years as well as seminars about resumes and job interviews. The writing major includes LANG 300 Career Preparation that students take in the sophomore year, at which time they evaluate their skills and calling, and in the senior year they take WRT 400 Writing Internship, where they learn how to write resumes and practice job interviews. Spanish, French, and English literature students take LANG 300 Career Preparation twice--once in the sophomore year and once in the senior year.

Minors are available in French, Spanish, Chinese, Hebrew, English literature, writing, and preprofessional English (a mixture of English and writing).

Freshmen and transfer students may bring in passing CLEP scores for English courses for their majors and minors; however, once students are enrolled at ORU, they cannot take CLEP tests to substitute for upper division courses in a degree program.

English Literature (B.A.)

The English literature major covers English literature, world literature, and American literature, as well as specific literary periods, such as the modern period, the English Romantic period, and others. These courses also focus on literary analysis, expression, and critique. This degree can be completed in three years by following the degree-in-three plan sheet. More information is available from the English and Modern Languages Department.

French (B.A.)

The French major covers language, linguistics, literature, culture, and history. This major provides a good liberal arts education and helps prepare students for graduate studies and for careers in teaching, mission work, and international business. This degree can be completed in three years by following the degree-in-three plan sheet. More information is available from the English and Modern Languages Department.

Spanish (B.A.)

The Spanish major covers language, linguistics, literature, culture, and history. This major provides a good liberal arts education and helps prepare students for graduate studies and for careers in teaching, mission work, social work, and international business. This degree can be completed in three years by following the degree-in-three plan sheet. More information is available from the English and Modern Languages Department.

Translation and Interpreting (B.A.)

For students with strong language skills, this major begins the process of professional preparation for a career in translation and interpreting. Students will be introduced to translation theory, consecutive and simultaneous interpreting and the tools of the trade. They will have the opportunity to apply their skills in service learning within the community and in other real world scenarios. Students will be prepared for work in such fields as education, government, industry, NGO's and faith-based organizations, freelance translation or for graduate programs in translation and interpreting.

Students are encouraged to take elective courses in a wide variety of subjects. Students seekeing a career as professional translators or interpreters will want to build a solid foundation and match standard international requirements, which often consist of two or more operational languages. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that students pursue a minor in another langauge (Arabic, Chinese, French, Modern Hebrew or Spanish).

Writing (B.A.)

Students desiring to major in writing may choose to focus on either literary or technical writing. Literary writing focuses on different literary genres, such as short story, poetry, scriptwriting, and others. For those choosing technical writing, the courses focus more on technical writing skills in the workplace, such as grant proposals, product manuals, and Web design. Writing majors are also required to complete a writing internship and pass a writing proficiency exam as part of their degree plan. This degree can be completed in three years by following the degree-in-three plan sheet. More information is available from the English and Modern Languages Department.

Teaching Licensure

The English and Modern Languages Department offers three options for students wanting to teach: (1) completion of the modern language education major and (2) completion of the English education major, or (3) completion of an English literature or Spanish or French major, which can lead to alternative certification.

A cooperative liaison is maintained throughout the program by the English and Modern Languages Department and the ORU College of Education. For this reason, it is important that all students interested in teachng identify themselves to both this department and the College of Education as soon as possible.

As alternative certification is intended for those seeking career changes, requirements vary widely from state to state, and laws governing these programs can change frequently. Therefore, students interested in pursuing alternative certification need to meet with the ORU College of Education’s certification officer to ensure they are well informed prior to choosing this option. Students pursuing alternative certification need to check with the State Department of Education from any state in which they plan to teach in order to ensure they meet specific requirements for that state’s alternative certification.

Modern Language Education (B.A.)

This major is a combination of education courses and language courses (French or Spanish) that are designed to equip students to earn teacher certification and teach French or Spanish in private and public middle or high schools.

English Education (B.A.)

The English and Modern Languages Department and the College of Education offer courses especially designed to equip students to earn teacher certification and teach English and writing in private and public middle or high schools.

Concentrations

Numerous concentrations, designed to supplement a student’s education, are offered to English and writing majors. For students majoring in English literature, concentrations are optional, but students majoring in writing need to choose a concentration in either journalism or literature and may choose a second concentration. Second concentrations to choose from include business, marketing, art, English as a second language, and pre-law. Twelve hours of course work are required for a concentration, and English literature majors may apply their elective hours toward a concentration in either prelaw or English as a second language.

Degree in Three

The English and Modern Languages Department offers four majors that industrious students can complete in three years: French, Spanish, English literature, and writing. Completing a major in three years involves taking courses in the summers, including the summer before a student’s freshman year. In the case of completing Spanish or French in three years, students may need to study abroad for one semester in order to complete the upper division (junior and senior level) courses. Degree plan sheets that show how the degrees can be completed in three years are available in the English and Modern Languages Department.

Clubs and Organizations

Le Cercle Francais, commonly known as the French Club, promotes a greater understanding of the French language and culture with activities such as special speakers, movies, French food, and holiday celebrations. Pi Delta Phi is ORU’s chapter of the National French Honor Society.

Spanish Club seeks to promote the Spanish language and Hispanic culture with activities such as special speakers, movies in Spanish, and holiday celebrations. Sigma Delta Pi is ORU’s chapter of the National Collegiate Hispanic Honor Society.

Hebrew Culture Club seeks to explore the Hebrew roots of faith in Yeshua (Jesus) with activities such as special speakers, movies, and Jewish holiday celebrations.

Students majoring and minoring in a foreign language also have more informal settings to practice a foreign language. One day per week a table in the cafeteria is set aside for students who speak French or are learning French to sit together and converse. The same is true for Spanish-speaking students to sit together and practice conversing in Spanish. Spanish majors and minors may also choose to attend a local church where services are conducted in Spanish.

ORU’s English Club is open to all students who share an interest in English and writing. The club hosts events throughout the year, including poetry readings, annual costume parties, movie nights, and other social events.

ORU has a chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, the International English Honor Society. The chapter meets throughout the school year for various activities. Students meeting academic requirements may apply for membership.

ORU has a student chapter of the C. S. Lewis and Inklings Society in the form of the C. S. Lewis and Inklings Club. The club holds events such as Tolkienfest and Hobbit Day as well as the annual international C. S. Lewis and Inklings Conference, which ORU has hosted three times. The Society is currently housed at ORU.

Special Programs and Opportunities

Many special opportunities are available for students in the English and Modern Languages Department. Some of these opportunities are designed to provide students with hands-on experience in their field of study, while others allow for academic growth within the classroom.

Study Abroad Program

It is recommended that all foreign language majors participate in a study-abroad program during their junior year. Students should work closely with their academic advisor during their sophomore year to set up a program for studying abroad. Proposals for study abroad must be approved by the International Study Committee prior to going abroad. Credit for study abroad is determined by the individual program; however, 12 to 15 hours and 9 hours during the summer can typically be transferred from one semester of study abroad. Those students who have declared a major or minor in a foreign language are eligible for consideration for financial aid for the study-abroad program. More information is available in the Non-Traditional Coursework section earlier in this catalog and from the English and Modern Languages Department.

Summer Travel Study

Summer travel study abroad (e.g., France, Puerto Rico) offered by the English and Modern Languages Department affords exciting opportunities to earn academic language credit as well as to gain valuable cultural insights. Credit for the travel-study courses may apply toward language majors and minors, general education foreign language requirements, or electives.

Oxford Summer Programme

The Oxford Summer Programme is a three-week study abroad program in Oxford England. Students participate in a specialized study program that includes lectures and seminars. The academic courses focus on the relationship between Christianity and the development of culture. More information is available in the Non-Traditional Coursework section earlier in this catalog and from the English and Modern Languages Department

Promethia

Promethia is the annual literary journal of Oral Roberts University. Its publication is entirely overseen by ORU students, with the aid of a faculty advisor. Students, as well as faculty and staff members, may submit essays, black and white photography, short stories, and poems for consideration.

Internships

A chief requirement for writing majors, and an option for writing minors, is to complete a writing internship. Internships may be done on or off campus, and several companies and organizations have standing arrangements with the department to provide internship opportunities for students. Students are free to seek their own internship opportunities, provided they meet department guidelines. Internships are a great opportunity for students to obtain real-world experience, learn outside of the classroom, and apply their knowledge and skills in a professional atmosphere.

Nimrod Workshop

The Nimrod Workshop is a one-day annual event held in October and is open to all English and writing students. At the workshop, published authors provide practical guidance to students to help them improve their creative writing skills. Department scholarships are available to help cover the workshop fee.

Walden Weekend

During one weekend in the fall semester, students have the opportunity to go to Myers Cabin, an ORU-affiliated retreat facility located in the woods of northeastern Oklahoma, approximately and hour and a half east of Tulsa. There students can relax, read, write, and hike in the manner of Henry Thoreau.

Awards and Scholarships

In recognition of scholarship, leadership, and ORU lifestyle commitment, the English and Modern Languages Department annually honors outstanding students by the presentation of the following awards:

Outstanding Senior Awards: One award is given to the outstanding senior in each of the following majors: English literature, French, Spanish, writing, and English or foreign language education.

Outstanding Department Senior: The names of the students winning the Outstanding Senior Awards are submitted for the Outstanding Department Senior Award. The winner of the Outstanding Department Senior Award then competes with the Outstanding Seniors from other academic departments in the College of Arts and Cultural Studies (CACS) to be named the Outstanding CACS Senior.

Outstanding Senior Paper: This recognizes the department’s best senior research project. The winner of this award participates in ORU’s Outstanding Senior Paper display in the spring.

Grady Walker Alumni Award: This $300 to $500 award given to a junior or senior English literature or writing major, is based on academic achievement, service to others, and financial need. The scholarship is funded by contributions from alumni in honor of Dr. Walker’s 40 years of teaching English and German at ORU.

The Peggy Null Research Award: This $500 to $750 award is given to one or two English literature or writing majors who have conducted excellent research in their academic papers.

Christa Hill French Overseas Study Award: This annual monetary award is given to one or two upper-level students who have demonstrated dedication in learning to speak French and would benefit in travel study or study abroad in a French-speaking country.

The Spanish Club Study Abroad Award: This $400 to $500 award is given to a junior or senior Spanish major toward a study abroad semester in a Spanish-speaking nation.

 

English Literature Major (ENG) Bachelor of Arts

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103 and ENG 201 plus two of the following: HUM 222*, 233*,244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244.

Health and Physical Education - 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 62

*At least one course must be chosen from courses with asterisks.

Major

ENG 310 World Literature - 3

ENG 311 British Literature I - 3

ENG 312 British Literature II - 3

ENG 323 American Literature I - 3

ENG 324 American Literature II - 3

ENG 351 Shakespeare - 3

LANG 300 Career Preparation Seminar* - 0

ENG 498 Senior Paper Research - 1

ENG 499 Senior Paper/Composition - 2

Choice of four of the following courses - 12

ENG 317 Multicultural Literature

ENG 352 Major Writers

ENG 359 English Medieval Period

ENG 370 American Romantic Period

ENG 420 English Romantic Period

ENG 421 English Victorian Period

ENG 436 Modern American Fiction

ENG 440 Modern Period

ENG 450 Literary Criticism

_____

Major Total - 33

*Students take LANG 300 twice, once in the sophomore year and once in the junior or senior year.

Cognate

WRT 304 Structure of Modern English - 3

WRT 355 History of the English Language - 3

Choice of one of the following courses - 3

WRT 300 Peer Tutor Workshop

ELL 303 TESL Principles

ELL 343 TESL Methods and Materials

____

Cognate Total - 9

Minor - 18

Elective credits Total - 7

____

Degree Total - 129

 

  
English as a Second Language (ESC)

Many students majoring in English go on to teach English in foreign countries. This concentration is designed to help prepare English literature majors for such work abroad.

Choice of four courses from the following - 12

ELL 315 Descriptive Linguistics

ELL 316 Sociolinguistics

ELL 343 TESL Methods and Materials

ELL 353 TESL Curriculum Design

ELL 413 Cross-Cultural Communication

ELL 433 Literature in the ESL Context

ENG 470 Teaching English

____

Concentration Total -12

Prelaw (PLC)

The English literature major is an excellent program for students interested in pursuing a legal career because it fosters communication and critical thinking skills.

Choice of four courses from the following - 12

GOV 299 Introduction to Law

GOV 450 American Jurisprudence

GOV 451 American Constitutional Law

GOV 452 Civil Liberties, Civil Rights, and Social Justice

GOV 453 Criminal Law and Procedure

GOV 451 International Law

GOV 454 Legal Policy and Process

ENG 451 Seminar: Law and Literature

____

Concentration Total - 12

  

WRITING MAJOR (WRT) Bachelor of Arts

Students in the writing major may focus on literary writing (creative writing) or technical (editing and creating websites) in their electives and choice of concentration.

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103 and ENG 201 plus two of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one of the following: PSY 201, MUS 208, SWK 202, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, BUS 201, FIN 244.

Health and Physical Education - 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total -62

*At least one course must be chosen from courses with asterisks.

Major

WRT 201 Introduction to Writing - 3

WRT 212 Writing Workshop: Revision - 1

WRT 304 Structure of Modern English - 3

WRT 312 Writing Workshop: Copyediting - 1

WRT 313 Writing Workshop: Diction - 1

WRT 331 Literary Writing - 3

WRT 335 Technical Writing I - 3

WRT 336 Technical Writing II - 3

WRT 400 Writing Internship- 3

WRT 430 Grant Writing - 3

PRFL 320 Writing Major/Minor Proficiency - 0

LANG 300 Career Preparation Seminar* - 0

Choice of six hours from the following courses - 6

PRP 213 Workshop: Publications

WRT 355 History of the English Language

WRT 400 Writing Internship

WRT 405 Literary Genres

WRT 412 Writing Workshop: Freelance & Publishing 

ENG 352 Majors Writers

ENG 436 Modern American Fiction

ENG 440 The Modern Period

ENG 451 Seminar

Choice of three hrs. from the following courses - 3

ENG 498 Senior Paper Research and ENG 499 Senior Paper/Composition

WRT 499 Senior Paper/Project

____

Major Total - 33

Required Concentration - 12

Electives** - 22

____

Degree Total - 129

*Students take LANG 300 once in the sophomore year.

**Students may apply some of these hours to earn a second concentration (12 hrs.) or a minor (18 hrs.).

Students completing a writing major need to choose a concentration in English literature or in journalism in addition to the courses in the major. A second concentration may be chosen using elective hours. 

Journalism (JRC)

Writing majors often work in the world of journalism (e.g., magazines, journals, newspapers). A journalism concentration can help prepare students for this workplace.

JRN 107 Newswriting I Lecture -3

JRN 108 Newswriting I Lab - 1

Choice of eight hrs. from the following courses - 8

ART 365 Digital Photography

JRN 205 Writing for the Media 

JRN 305 News Editing 

JRN 317 Investigative Reporting

JRN 321 Media Law and Ethics

JRN 444 Feature Writing

PRP 213 Workshop: Publications 

PRP 214 Workshop: Newspaper 

PRP 215 Workshop: Newsgathering 

TVF 408 Broadcast News 

____

Concentration Total - 12

  

Literature (LITC)

Writing and literature complement each other, so a literature concentration can help prepare students for this workplace.

Choice of four courses from the following -12

ENG 307 Culture and the Christian Imagination

ENG 309 Young Adult Literature

ENG 317 Multicultural Literature

ENG 351 Shakespeare

ENG 352 Major Writers

ENG 359 English Medieval Period: 650-1500

ENG 370 American Romantic Period

ENG 421 English Victorian Period

ENG 436 Modern American Fiction

ENG 440 Modern Period

____

Concentration Total - 12

 

 Concentrations

A second concentration may be earned in one of the following areas by completing a minimum of 12 hours in that concentration.
Art (ARTC)

An art concentration can benefit writing majors who help design brochures, web pages, and other documents involving graphics. It also provides historical background for fictional writing.

Choice of four courses from the following - 12

ART 101 Fundamentals of Art I

ART 102 Fundamentals of Art II

ART 103 Art History Survey I

ART 104 Art History Survey II

ART 203 Painting I

ART 204 Printmaking I

ART 213 Drawing

ART 223 Crafts

ART 307 Art History Survey III

ART 363 Black and White Photography

____

Concentration Total - 12

English as a Second Language (ESC)

Many students majoring in English go on to teach English in foreign countries. This concentration is designed to help prepare English literature majors for such work abroad.

Choice of four courses from the following - 12

ELL 315 Descriptive Linguistics

ELL 316 Sociolinguistics

ELL 343 Methods and Materials

ELL 353 TESL Curriculum Design

ELL 413 Cross-Cultural Communication

ELL 433 Literature in the ESL Context

ENG 470 Teaching English

____

Concentration TotaL - 12

Prelaw (PLC)

The English literature major is an excellent program for students interested in pursuing a legal career because it fosters communication and critical thinking skills.

Choice of four courses from the following - 12

ENG 451 Seminar: Law and Literature

GOV 299 Introduction to Law

GOV 450 American Jurisprudence

GOV 451 American Constitutional Law

GOV 452 Civil Liberties, Civil Rights, and Social Justice

GOV 453 Criminal Law and Procedure

GOV 451 International Law

GOV 454 Legal Policy and Process

____

Concentration Total - 12

  

French Major (FRE) Bachelor of Arts

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (lecture and lab) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities -12

HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 303, MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244, PSY 201, MUS 208, SOC 101, SOC 201, SWK 202.

Health and Physical Education - 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 56

*At least one course must be chosen from courses with asterisks.

Major

FRE 204 Intermediate French II - 3

FRE 301 Phonetics and Conversation - 3

FRE 302 French Composition - 3

FRE 303 Survey of French Literature I - 3

FRE 304 Survey of French Literature II - 3

FRE 499 Senior Paper - 3

LANG 300 Career Preparation Seminar* - 0

Choice of twelve hours from the following - 12

FRE 219 Travel Study

FRE 305 French Civilization and Culture

FRE 306 Business French

FRE 430 French Literary Periods

FRE 433 French Literary Genres

FRE 450 Internship

____

Major Total - 30

Minor - 18

Elective credits Total - 25

____

Degree Total - 129

*Students take LANG 300 twice, once in the sophomore year and once in the junior or senior year.

 

Spanish Major (SPA) Bachelor of Arts

General Education

Introduction to Whole Persona Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (lecture and lab) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 250, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244, MUS 208, PSY 201, SOC 101, SOC 201, SWK 202.

Health and Physical Education - 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 56

 *At least one course must be chosen from list courses with asterisks.

Major

SPA 204 Intermediate Spanish II - 3

SPA 301 Phonetics and Conversation - 3

SPA 302 Spanish Composition - 3

SPA 314 Survey of Latin American Literature - 3

SPA 316 Civilization and Culture of Spain - 3

SPA 499 Senior Paper - 3

LANG 300 Career Preparation Seminar* - 0

Choice of nine hours from the following - 9

SPA 219 Travel Study

SPA 306 Business Spanish

SPA 430 Spanish Literary Periods

SPA 450 Internship

Choice of one of these two literature courses - 3

SPA 303 Survey of Spanish Literature I

SPA 304 Survey of Spanish Literature II

____

Major Total - 30

Minor - 18

Elective credits Total - 25

____

Degree Total - 129

*Students take LANG 300 twice, once in the sophomore year and once in the junior or senior year.

 

translation and interpreting MAJOR (tran) BACHELOR OF ARTS

GENERAL EDUCATION

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (lecture and lab) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 250, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244, MUS 208, PSY 201, SOC 101, SOC 201, SWK 202.

Health and Physical Education - 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 56

 *At least one course must be chosen from list courses with asterisks.

MAJOR

FRE/SPA 204 Intermediate French/Spanish II - 3

FRE/SPA 301 Phonetics and Conversation - 3

FRE/SPA 302 French/Spanish Composition - 3

FRE/SPA 306 Business Language - 3

FRE/SPA 450 Internship - 3

FRE/SPA 499 Senior Paper - 3

INTR 321 Beginning Interpreting - 3

INTR 331 Intermediate Interpreting - 3

INTR 441 Advanced Interpreting - 3

TRNS 310 Introduction to Translation and Interpreting - 3

TRNS 321 Beginning Translation - 3

TRNS 331 Intermediate Translation - 3

TRNS 441 Advanced Translation - 3

Choice of one of the following civilization and culture courses3

FRE 305 Civilization and Culture

SPA 315 Latin America Civilization and Culture

SPA 3i6 Civilization and Culture of Spain

Choice of one of the following junior literature courses3

FRE 303 Survey of French Literature I

FRE 304 Survey of French Literautre II

SPA 303 Survey of Spanish Literature I

SPA 304 Survey of Spanish Literature II

 SPA 314 Survey of Latin American Literature

  ____

Major Total - 45

cognate

WRT 304 Structure of Modern English - 3

 ____

Cognate Total - 3

Minor - 18

Elective credits Total -  7

____

Degree Total - 129

 

English Education Major (engE) with Secondary school Teaching Licensure    Bachelor of Arts

This major meets the State of Oklahoma’s requirements for a teaching license at the secondary level (middle and high school). Students may earn licensure in a second subject/content area. The Oklahoma Commission for Teacher Preparation requires the OSAT/OPTE test(s) be passed in order to obtain a license in an additional subject/content area. Students interested in completing coursework toward additional licensing should consult the subject area advisor.

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) -  3

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) - 6

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (physical and biological) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103 and ENG 201 plus two of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244, MUS 208, PSY 201, SOC 101, SOC 201, SWK 202.

Health and Physical Education - 4.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, Basic First Aid/CPR, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 61.5

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses with asterisks.

Major

ENG 309 Young Adult Literature - 3

ENG 310 World Literature - 3

ENG 311 British Literature I - 3

ENG 312 British Literature II - 3

ENG 323 American Literature I - 3

ENG 324 American Literature II - 3

ENG 351 Shakespeare - 3

ENG 498 Senior Paper Research - 1

ENG 499 Senior Paper/Composition - 2

WRT 300 Workshop for Peer Tutors - 3

WRT 304 Structure of Modern English - 3

WRT 331 Literary Writing - 3

PRFL 320 Writing Major/Minor Proficiency - 0

Choice of two of the following courses - 6

ENG 317 Multicultural Literature

ENG 352 Major Writers

ENG 359 English Medieval Period

ENG 370 American Romantic Period

ENG 420 English Romantic Period

ENG 421 English Victorian Period

ENG 436 Modern American Fiction

ENG 440 Modern Period

ENG 451 Seminar

WRT 355 History of the English Language

WRT 405 Literary Genres

____

Major Total - 39

Professional Education

ENG 470 Teaching English - 3

PED 100 Education Seminar (every semester) - 0

PED 121 Field Based Experience/Practicum (Secondary) - 1 

PED 203 Foundations and Methods of Education - 3

PED 222 School Health Care - 1

PED 305 Pedagogy I - 4

PED 306 Pedagogy II - 4

PED 361 Professional Education Seminar/Portfolio - 0

PED 485 Intern/Student Teaching: 7-9 - 5

PED 495 Intern/Student Teaching 10-12 - 5

____

Professional Education Total - 26

Elective Credits Total - 3

____

Degree Total - 129.5

  

Modern Foreign Language Education Major(MFLE) with K-12 Teaching Licensure Bachelor of Arts

This major meets the State of Oklahoma’s requirements for a teaching license at the elementary and secondary levels (K-12). Students may earn licensure in a second subject/content area. The Oklahoma Commission for Teacher Preparation requires the OSAT/OPTE test(s) be passed in order to obtain a license in an additional subject/content area. Students interested in completing coursework toward additional licensing should consult the subject area advisor.

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (physical and biological) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103 and ENG 201 plus two of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244, MUS 208, PSY 201, SOC 101, SOC 201, SWK 202.

Health and Physical Education - 4.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, Basic First Aid/ CPR, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 55.5

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses with asterisks.

Major

FRE, SPA 204 Intermediate II - 3

FRE, SPA 301 Phonetics & Conversation - 3

FRE, SPA 302 Composition - 3

FRE, SPA 499 Senior Paper - 3

Students emhasizing French complete the following courses:

FRE 303 Survey of French Literature I - 3

FRE 304 Survey of French Literature II - 3

FRE 305 French Civilization and Culture - 3

Choice of one of the following courses - 3

FRE 430 French Literary Periods

FRE 433 French Literary Genres

Choice of nine hours from the following courses - 9

FRE 219 Travel Study

FRE 306 Business French

FRE 430 French Literary Periods

FRE 433 French Literary Genres

FRE 450 Internship

STUDENTS EMHASIZING FRENCH COMPLETE THE FOLLOWING COURSES:

SPA 314 Survey of Latin American Lit - 3

SPA 315 Latin American Civilization and Culture - 3

SPA 316 Spanish Culture and Civilization - 3

SPA 430 Spanish Literary Periods - 3

Choice of one of the following courses - 3

SPA 303 Survey of Spanish Literature I 

SPA 304 Survey of Spanish Literature II

Choice of six hours from the following courses - 6

SPA 219 Travel Study

SPA 303 Survey of Spanish Literature I 

SPA 304 Survey of Spanish Literature II

SPA 306 Business French

SPA 430 French Literary Periods

SPA 433 French Literary Genres

SPA 450 Internship

 ____

Major Total - 33

Professional Education

PED 100 Education Seminar (every semester) - 0

Choice of one of the two field-based courses - 1

LANG 470 Teaching Languages - 3

PED 111 Field-Based Experience/Practicum (Elementary)

PED 121 Field-Based Experience/Practicum (Secondary)

PED 203 Foundations &Methods of Education - 3

PED 222 School Health Care - 1

PED 305 Pedagogy I - 4

PED 306 Pedagogy II - 4

PED 361 Professional Education Seminar/ Portfolio - 0

PED 475 Student Teaching: Elementary - 5

PED 495 Student Teaching: Secondary - 5

____

Professional Education Total - 26

Elective credits Total - 14.5

____

Degree Total - 129

 

minors

arabic Minor (araM)

An Arabic minor requires 18 hours of coursework in arabic and may include 102, 203, and 204. The 101 course does not apply toward the minor. Students with an international business major and Arabic minor must take ARA 306 Business Arabic.

Chinese Minor (CHNM)

A Chinese minor requires 18 hours of coursework in Chinese and may include 102, 203, and 204. The 101 course does not apply toward the minor. Students with an international business major and Chinese minor must take CHI 306 Business Chinese.

French Minor (FREM)

A French minor requires 18 hours of foreign language coursework and may include 102, 203, and 204, plus three more courses. The 101 course does not apply toward the minor. Students with an international business major and French minor must take FRE 306 Business French.

Hebrew Minor (HEBM)

A Hebrew minor requires 18 hours of foreign language coursework and may include 102, 203, and 204, plus three more courses. The 101 course does not apply toward the minor.

Spanish Minor (SPAM)

A Spanish minor requires 18 hours of foreign language coursework and may include 102, 203, and 204. The 101 course does not apply toward the minor. Students with an international business major and Spanish minor must take SPA 306 Business Spanish.

 

 

English Literature Minor (ENGM)

The English minor is designed for students majoring in another discipline who desire a minor in English.

ENG 201 Introduction to Literature - 3

ENG Electives - 9

Choice of an American literature survey course - 3

ENG 323 American Literature I

ENG 324 American Literature II

Choice of a British literature survey course - 3

ENG 311 British Literature I

ENG 312 British Literature II

____

Minor Total - 18

Writing Minor (WRIM)

This minor is designed for students desiring to sharpen their writing skills or to prepare for careers that involve the written word.

ENG 201 Introduction to Literature - 3

WRT 201 Introduction to Writing* - 3

WRT 212 Writing Workshop: Revision - 1

WRT 304 Structure of Modern English - 3

PRFL 320 Writing Major/Minor Proficiency - 0

Choice of eight hours from the following courses - 8

PRP 213 Workshop Publications 

WRT 312 Writing Workshop: Copyediting 

WRT 313 Writing Workshop: Diction 

WRT 331 Literary Writing

WRT 335 Technical Writing I*

WRT 336 Technical Writing II 

WRT 355 History of the English Language

WRT 400 Writing Internship 

WRT 405 Literary Genres

WRT 412 Writing Workshop: Freelance and Publishing

____

Minor Total - 19

 *Requires the corresponding writing workshop as a corequisite.

PreProfessional English Minor (PPEM)

This minor is designed for students majoring in another discipline but desiring to sharpen their skills in writing and literature.

Choice of four courses from the following - 12

ENG 201 Introduction to Literature

ENG 310 World Literature

ENG 311 English Literature I

ENG 312 English Literature II

ENG 317 Multicultural Literature

ENG 323 American Literature I

ENG 324 American Literature II

ENG 351 Shakespeare

ENG 352 Major Writers

ENG 359 English Medieval Period: 650-1500

ENG 370 American Romantic Period

ENG 420 English Romantic Period: 1798-1832

ENG 421 English Victorian Period

ENG 436 Modern American Fiction

ENG 440 The Modern Period

ENG 450 Literary Criticism

ENG 451 Seminar

ENG 470 Teaching English

Choice of six hours from the following courses - 6

PRP 213 Workshop Publications

WRT 201 Introduction to Writing* 

WRT 212 Writing Workshop: Revision 

WRT 312 Writing Workshop: Copyediting 

WRT 313 Writing Workshop: Diction

WRT 304 Structure of Modern English

WRT 331 Literary Writing

WRT 335 Technical Writing I

WRT 336 Technical Writing II 

WRT 355 History of the English Language 

WRT 400 Writing Internship 

WRT 405 Literary Genres 

WRT 412 Writing Workshop: Freelance and Publishing

____

Minor Total - 18

*Requires the corresponding writing workshop as a corequisite.

 

Departmental Courses

Descriptions of the courses listed below are in the section titled Course Descriptions at the end of this catalog. Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order by the prefix.

Courses offered are listed as “F” for the “fall,” “S” for the “spring,” and “Sum” for “summer.” Courses with no designation have variable schedules. The department has more information.

American Sign Language

ASL 111 American Sign Language I - F, S

ASL 112 American Sign Language II - F, S

arabic

ARA 101 Beginning Arabic I

ARA 102 Beginning Arabic II

ARA 203 Intermediate Arabic I

ARA 204 Intermediate Arabic II

ARA 301 Arabic Conversation and Grammar

ARA 302 Arabic Composition,

ARA 305 Civilization and Culture of the Arabic-speaking World

ARA 306 Business Arabic

ARA 450 Internship

ARA 451 Special Readings

Chinese

CHI 101 Elementary Chinese I - F

CHI 102 Elementary Chinese II - S

CHI 203 Intermediate Chinese I - F

CHI 204 Intermediate Chinese II - S

CHI 219 Travel Study - Sum

CHI 301 Phonetics and Conversation - F

CHI 302 Literature and Composition - S

CHI 305 Chinese Civilization and Culture

CHI 306 Business Chinese

CHI 450 Internship

CHI 451 Special Readings

Composition

COMP 099 Preparation for Composition I

COMP 101 Composition I - F, S

COMP 102 Composition II - F, S, Sum

COMP 303 Critical Reading and Writing - F, S, Sum

English

ENG 201 Introduction to Literature - F

ENG 307 Culture and the Christian Imagination

ENG 309 Young Adult Literature

ENG 310 World Literature - S

ENG 311 British Literature I - F*

ENG 312 British Literature II - S**

ENG 317 Multicultural Literature

ENG 323 American Literature I - F**

ENG 324 American Literature II - S*

ENG 351 Shakespeare - F

ENG 352 Major Writers

ENG 359 English Medieval Period: 650-1500

ENG 370 American Romantic Period

ENG 420 English Romantic Period: 1798-1832

ENG 421 English Victorian Period

ENG 436 Modern American Fiction

ENG 440 The Modern Period

ENG 450 Literary Criticism

ENG 451 Seminar

ENG 470 Teaching English - F

ENG 498 Senior Paper Research

ENG 499 Senior Paper Composition - F

ENG 999 Elective

 
French

FRE 101 Elementary French I - F, S

FRE 102 Elementary French II - F, S

FRE 203 Intermediate French I - F, S

FRE 204 Intermediate French II - F, S

FRE 219 Travel Study - Sum

FRE 301 French Phonetics and Conversation

FRE 302 French Composition

FRE 303 Survey of French Literature I

FRE 304 Survey of French Literature II

FRE 305 French Civilization and Culture

FRE 306 Business French

FRE 430 French Literary Periods

FRE 433 French Literary Genres

FRE 450 Internship

FRE 451 Special Readings

FRE 499 Senior Paper - F

FRE 999 Elective

General Studies

GEN 099 Whole Person Assessment (online programs only)

GEN 101 Prior Learning Assessment

GEN 114 Distance Learning Strategies (online programs only)

GEN 150 Introduction to Whole Person Education

 
german

GER 101 Elementary German I - F

GER 102 Elementary German II - S

GER 203 Intermediate German I - F

GER 451 Special Readings

GER 999 Elective

Hebrew

HEB 101 Elementary Hebrew I - F, S

HEB 102 Elementary Hebrew II - F, S

HEB 203 Intermediate Hebrew I - F, S

HEB 204 Intermediate Hebrew II - F, S

HEB 301 Hebrew Conversation/Grammar

HEB 302 Hebrew Composition

HEB 305 Hebrew Civilization and Culture

HEB 451 Special Readings

HEB 999 Elective

Languages

LANG 112 Language Coaching - F, S

LANG 300 Career Preparation

LANG 470 Teaching Languages

LANG 999 Elective

 
Proficiencies

PRFL 001 Foreign Language Proficiency - F, S

PRFL 320 Major/Minor Writing Proficiency - F, S

Reading

READ 099 Preparation for College Reading - F

Spanish

SPA 101 Elementary Spanish I - F, S, Sum

SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II - F, S, Sum

SPA 203 Intermediate Spanish I - F, S, Sum

SPA 204 Intermediate Spanish II - F, S

SPA 219 Travel Study - Sum

SPA 301 Spanish Phonetics and Conversation

SPA 302 Spanish Composition

SPA 303 Survey of Spanish Literature I

SPA 304 Survey of Spanish Literature II

SPA 306 Business Spanish - F

SPA 314 Survey of Latin American Literature

SPA 315 Latin American Civilization and Culture

SPA 316 Civilization and Culture of Spain

SPA 430 Spanish Literary Periods

SPA 433 Spanish Literary Genres

SPA 450 Internship

SPA 451 Special Readings

SPA 499 Senior Paper - F

SPA 999 Elective

 
Writing

WRT 112 Reading and Writing Laboratory - F, S

WRT 201 Introduction to Writing - S

WRT 212 Writing Workshop: Revising - S

WRT 300 Peer Tutor Workshop - F

WRT 304 Structure of Modern English - F

WRT 312 Writing Workshop: Copyediting - F**

WRT 313 Writing Workshop: Diction - F*

WRT 331 Literary Writing - F

WRT 335 Technical Writing I - F

WRT 336 Technical Writing II - S

WRT 355 History of the English Language - S*

WRT 400 Writing Internship - F, S, Sum

WRT 405 Literary Genres - S

WRT 412 Writing Workshop: Freelance and Publishing

WRT 430 Grant Writing - F, Sum

WRT 450 Directed Study

WRT 499 Senior Paper/Project - F, S

WRT 999 Elective

  

History, Humanities, and Government Department

William Curtis Ellis, Ph.D., Chair

MISSION STATEMENT: History, humanities, and government are vital for enabling students to understand who they are in our modern context. For our students to understand who they are, they have to begin to understand and value our past. Our work is to give them a foundation in humanities, history, government, international relations, and community development work so as to contribute and make an impact on their world. Leaders, change agents, and difference makers--both national and international--are developed through academics and mentoring; we teach students, not just subjects. To accomplish this end, we have to cultivate our own horizons into a collegial teaching ministry, led by the Spirit, founded on Judeo-Christian traditions, and presented in a Charismatic/ Christian worldview.

Overview

Civilization is founded on history, for a civilized human being is one who holds values that are irrelevant without perspective. History provides both record and interpretation without which perspective is impossible. Perspective provides insight into why present institutions and society are what they are. Analysis of the whys of the past suggests actions that may be expected to produce positive changes in contemporary institutions and society.

Majors and minors offered through this department are excellent preparation for students planning to implement the founding purpose of Oral Roberts University—to go into every person’s world, as well as to practice professions such as law, government, business, journalism, teaching, or any field requiring knowledge of an ability to evaluate national and world events.

The programs offered through this department can help prepare students for careers such as the following:

  • U.S. or State Senator/Representative
  • Legal and litigation researcher
  • Campaign manager
  • Historical archeologist or anthropologist
  • Public historian
  • College or university professor
  • News analyst
  • Nonprofit organization officer
  • Humanitarian organization officer
  • City manager
  • Missions or community work
  • Civil servant
  • Press secretary
  • Lawyer
  • NGO advisors
  • International Development officers
  • U.S. President
General Education Courses

The ORU required general education core curriculum is the foundation on which each ORU student may build a charismatic Christian worldview and image of mankind in harmony with the distinctive founding purpose of the university. All ORU students pursuing a bachelor’s degree at ORU are required to complete at least general education courses in the History, Humanities, and Government Department: HIS 101, GOV 101, HUM 103, and at least three additional humanities courses. Some departments in the university specify which humanities courses their students need to take to fulfill the humanities requirements. Students can also participate in travel studies to earn credit for humanities courses.

Degree in Three

The History, Humanities, and Government Department offers four majors that industrious students can complete in three years: government, history, international relations, and international/community development. Completing a degree in three years involves taking courses in the summers, including the summer before a student’s freshman year. Degree plan sheets that show how the degrees can be completed in three years are available in the History, Humanities, and Government Department.

Degree Programs

The History, Humanities, and Government Department offers eight majors: (1) government, (2) global studies, (3) history, (4) international community development, (5) international relations, (6) leadership studies, (7) liberal studies, and (8) social studies education. The department also offers the following minors: aerospace studies, history, humanities, government, international relations, and prelaw.

Government (B.A.)

Government examines power and authority relations in human communities including their foundations, their institutional organization, and how they are used to make public policy. Government is the study of how people govern and are governed—and with what results—in cities, states, and nations.

A government major at ORU helps prepare students for careers in several fields by emphasizing breadth of knowledge about national and world affairs, especially analyzing them in the light of Judeo-Christian values and principles, analytical reading and advanced writing skills, and ability to use a variety of research skills. When combined with an appropriate graduate degree (J.D., Ph.D., M.P.A., etc.), study of government is an excellent preparation for law, business, journalism, Christian ministries and missions, and other fields. Since political decision-making touches all aspects of life, its study opens new perspectives for all Christian citizens and professionals. This major is also available through the ORU Online and Lifelong Learning department. 

Global Studies (B.A.)

The global studies major is an interdisciplinary degree program in practical missions, preparing graduates to address not only spiritual but also educational, economic, medical, and physical needs. Student with this major choose one of three areas of study (Asia, Middle East, Latin America) and a language minor (Mandarin, Hebrew, Spanish) that corresponds with the chosen area of study.

History (B.A.)

Each student majoring in history chooses three of four areas that provide an integrated, focused-area degree, selected to prepare him or her for service in “every person’s world.” For success in today’s professions, the ORU graduate requires historical-cultural understanding to best minister healing for the totality of human needs. This major can provide that understanding. 

INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY Development (B.A.)

International Community Development is an interdisciplinary degree program in practical missions, preparing graduates to address not only spiritual but also educational, economic, medical, and physical needs. A major in ICD is preparation to work in a helping capacity--through churches, ministries, mission agencies, nonprofit organizations, relief organizations, international schools, government agencies, and a variety of other endeavors in the USA and abroad. The basic skills taught in ICD—needs assessment, problem solving, training, and leadership—are valuable in any field. However, this major does not lead to a teaching license, nor is it a teacher certification area.

International Relations (B.A.)

The international relations major is designed for
students interested in learning about and/or pursuing a career in diplomacy and regionalized or international politics. The major also includes studies in economics, theology, and linguistics and requires a minor. A student majoring in international relations will be adequately
prepared for the diversity in the modern global arena through a strong foundation of Judeo-Christian principles as they apply to international studies.

Leadership Studies (B.S.)

The leadership studies major is designed to emphasize inquiry, understanding, skill development, practice, and reflection. Students in this major pursue a
rigorous program of study in leadership theory, organizational communication, public and private sector leadership, church leadership, conflict resolution, ethics, and administrative theory.

Liberal Studies (B.S.)

This major is designed for the student who wants to pursue two or three areas of study--in the tradition of a true liberal arts education. Students must complete
63 credit hours in two or three areas of study with at least 45 credit hours of upper-level (300 or 400) courses. This program is offered through the ORU Online and Lifelong Learning Deaprtment.

Social Studies Education (B.A)

Students seeking licensure to teach at the secondary levels have two options: (1) completion of the social studies education major, which leads to standard
certification or (2) completion of a government or history major, which can lead to alternative certification. As alternative certification is intended for those seeking career changes, requirements vary widely from state to state, and laws governing these programs can change frequently. Therefore, students interested in pursuing alternative certification need to meet with the ORU College of Education’s certification officer to ensure they are well informed prior to choosing this option. Students interested in a teaching license should work closely with the advisor in the major department. The social studies education major cuts across subject fields, thus allowing the graduate to teach middle and secondary school classes in civics, democracy, economics, government, United States history, world history, Oklahoma history, and sociology.

Prelaw

Although ORU does not have a prelaw major, students interested in law usually choose an appropriate major--almost always history or government--and add the prelaw minor. However, other majors such as English, sociology, business, or languages are also good choices for prelaw students to select in order to develop conceptual, analytical, reading comprehension, argumentation skills in a courtroom setting, writing, and research skills so essential to law study.

A faculty member in the History, Humanities, Government department serves as the university-wide prelaw advisor for every prelaw student, no matter what major is selected. The prelaw advisor is responsible for planning the prelaw course of study, which is individually tailored to meet each student’s specific career goals. The prelaw advisor has information about a wide variety of law schools in all parts of the country, and the prelaw advisor meets regularly with each prelaw student to discuss the student’s academic progress. Students interested in prelaw should contact the department to be assigned to the prelaw advisor.

 

Special Activities and Opportunities

Oklahoma Intercollegiate Legislature(O.I.L.) is a mock legislature assembly held each fall and spring in Oklahoma City. Students also compete in moot court and journalism competitions with universities in Oklahoma. Students can receive up to 3 credit hours for participating.

Model United Nations (M.U.N.) is a mock United Nations assembly held each spring semester in St. Louis or Chicago. ORU sends a delegation to the conference to represent a different nation each year, such as Israel 2005, Syria and Denmark 2006, Panama and Kenya 2007, Congo and the Czech Republic 2008, Angola 2009, Egypt 2010, Saudi Arabia 2011, and Afghanistan 2012. Although competition is keen, each student majoring in international relations is encouraged to participate and thereby receive credit for GOV 488 while gaining valuable hands-on experience.

Travel Studies--There are several opportunities for students to travel abroad, and students may earn credit through directed studies which emphasize their international travel. Each course requires specific papers, powerpoints, presentations, individual re-search, journals, readings, and reports as directed by the professor in charge. For further information contact the professor of the particular destination. Credit is available for humanities, history, and government as appropriate.

 

Awards

In recognition of scholarship, leadership, and ORU lifestyle commitment, the History, Humanities, Government Department offers the following awards and scholarships.

 

Outstanding Senior Award

The History, Humanities, and Government Department annually honors a graduating senior in each of the following majors: government, history, social studies education, international relations, international community development, and leadership studies. The department also recognizes the outstanding overall student.

 

Outstanding Senior Paper

This recognizes the department’s best senior research project in all majors.

  

HISTORY MAJOR (HIS) BACHELOR OF ARTS

General Education 

Introduction to Whole Person Educ (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (lecture and lab) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105 or 232) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103 plus three of the 12 following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244, MUS 208, PSY 201, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, SWK 202.

Health and Physical Education - 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 62

*At least one course must be chosen from courses with asterisks.

Major

HIS 201 Historiography - 3

HIS 351 Evangelical and Charismatic Christianity in America - 3

HIS 491 History Internship - 3

HIS Area Studies* - 27

HIS 499 Senior Paper/Project - 3

____

Major Total - 39

*Students choose three of four areas (U.S., Europe, Latin America, Asia/Middle East) and take a minimum of 9 hours in each of the three areas chosen.

 

Minor

Students choose a minor after consulting with an advisor. Appropriate examples include government, humanities, business, English, prelaw, or a foreign language. Some students may use elective hours to complete a second minor.

Minor Total - 18

Elective credits Total - 9

____

Degree Total - 128

 

  

 GLOBAL STUDIES MAJOR (GLOB) BACHELOR OR ARTS

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (lecture and lab) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105 or 232) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103 plus three of the 12 following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244, MUS 208, PSY 201, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, SWK 202.

Health and Physical Education - 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 56

*At least one course must be chosen from courses with asterisks.

Major

GOV 305 Comparative Government - 3

GOV 311 International Relations - 3

GOV 370 Area Studies (concentration specific) - 3

GOV 449 Poilitical Science Research Methods - 3

IS 301 Global Perspectives in the Modern World - 3

IS 350 Internship in International Studies - 3

IS 440 Global Issues - 3

IS 499 Senior Paper - 3

Choice of three of the following courses - 9

BIB 358 Turkey Study Tour

BUS 361 International Business

ENG 310 World Literature

ENG 317 Multicultural Literature

EVR 201 Global Development and Sustainability

GOV 369 Protocol and Diplomacy

GOV 381 American Foreign Policy

GOV 391 International Political Economy

HIS 490 Cultural Geography

HUM 333 Travel Studies

IS 361 Foundation of international Community Development

IS 370 Problems in International Community Development

IS 391 Seminar in International Community Development

SOC 308 Cultural Anthropology

____

Major Total - 33

 

Concentrations

 Students choose a concentration in one of the following three areas by completing a minimum of 9 hours in that concentration.

Asian Studies Concentration (ASC)

Choice of three courses from the following - 9

HIS 381 Modern China and Japan

HIS 382 History of India and Southeast Asia

HIS 483 Contemporary Asia

HUM 333 Travel Studies: Asia

HUM 350 Area Studies (concentration specific)

____

Concentration Total - 9

Middle Eastern Studies Concentration (MESC)

Choice of three courses from the following - 9

BIB 358 Turkey Study Tour

BIB 401 Israel Study Trip

HIS 371 Islamic Middle East

HIS 472 Twentieth Centure Middle East

HIS 473 The Rise of Modern Israel

HUM 333 Travel Studies: Middle East

HUM 350 Area Studies (concentration specific)

____

Concentration Total - 9

Latin American Studies Concentration (LASC)

Choice of three courses from the following - 9

HIS 361 Colonial Latin America

HIS 362 Survey of Latin America

HIS 464 The Caribbean, Mexico, and Central America

HUM 333 Travel Studies: Latin America

HUM 350 Area Studies (concentration specific)

____

Concentration Total - 9

Modern Language Minor - 18              (corresponding with area of concentration)

Elective credits Total - 12

____

Degree Total - 128

  

GOVERNMENT MAJOR (GOV) BACHELOR OR ARTS

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (lecture and lab) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105 or 232) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103 plus three of the 12 following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244, MUS 208, PSY 201, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, SWK 202.

Health and Physical Education - 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 62

*At least one course must be chosen from list courses with asterisks.

Major

GOV 201 Introduction to Political Science - 3

GOV 331 Western Political Theory - 3

GOV 335 Christian Faith and Government: Theory - 3

GOV 336 Christian Faith and Government: Practicum - 3

GOV 499 Senior Paper/Project - 3

Choice of one of the following two courses - 3

GOV 449 Political Science Research 

GOV 461 Public Policy Analysis

GOV* Government Major electives - 12

GOV 305 Comparative Government 

GOV 311 International Relations 

GOV 321 Legislative Process 

GOV 322 Political Parties and Elections 

GOV 323 American Political Leadership 

GOV 341 Public Administration 

GOV 370 Area Studies 

GOV 381 American Foreign Policy

GOV 391 International Political Economy

GOV 479 Readings in Government

GOV 487 Oklahoma Intercollegiate Legislature Internship 

GOV 488 Model United Nations Internship 

GOV 489 American Studies Internship 

____

Major Total - 30

Minor - 18

Elective credits Total - 18

____

Degree Total - 128

*Maximum nine hours from GOV 479, 487, 488, and 489 combined.

  

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS MAJOR (INR) BACHELOR OF ARTS

General Education 

Introduction to Whole Person Education - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (lecture and lab) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105 or 232) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244, MUS 208, PSY 201, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, SWK 202.

Health and Physical Education - 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 62

*At least one course must be chosen from courses with asterisks.

Major

GOV 201 Introduction to Political Science - 3

GOV 305 Comparative Government - 3

GOV 311 International Relations - 3

GOV 369 Protocol and Diplomacy - 3

GOV 391 International Political Economy - 3

GOV 449 Political Science Research - 3

GOV 488 Model United Nations Internship - 3

IS 499 Senior Paper/Project - 3

Choice of two courses from the following - 6

GOV 331 Western Political Theory

GOV 335 Christian Faith and Government: Theory

GOV 370 Area Studies

GOV 479 Readings in Government

HIS 324 Modern Europe

HIS 361 Colonial Latin America

HIS 362 Survey of Latin America

HIS 371 Islamic Middle East

HIS 372 Ancient Near East

HIS 381 Modern China and Japan

HIS 382 History of India and Southeast Asia

HIS 473 Rise of Modern Israel

IS 350 Internship in International Studies

IS 440 Global Issues

MMC 489 Campaign Strategies

THE 303 Major Religions of the World

____

Major Total - 30

Cognate

GOV 381 American Foreign Policy - 3

ELL 413 Cross Cultural Communications - 3

IS 301 Global Perspect in the Modern World - 3

____

Cognate Total - 9

Minor - 18

Elective credits Total - 9

____

Degree Total - 128

INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT MAJOR (ICD) BACHELOR OF ARTS

General Education 

Intro to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110,120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (EVR 250/250L plus one additional science lecture and lab) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105 or 232) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, MAT 315.

Social Science (BUS 201) - 3 

Health and Physical Education - 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total -62

Major

GOV 391 International Political Economy - 3

GOV 449 Political Science Research Methods - 3

HIS 490 Cultural Geography - 3

IS 340 Needs Assessment - 3

IS 341 Program Evaluation - 3

IS 350 Internship in International Studies - 3

IS 361 Foundations of ICD - 3

IS 499 Senior Seminar and Paper - 3

Choose two of the following courses - 6

IS 365 Disaster Relief 

IS 370 Problems in ICD 

IS 391 Seminar in ICD 

IS 460 Conflict Resolution and Analysis 

____

Major Total - 30

Cognate

ACT 215 Principles of Financial Accounting I - 3

ELL 413 Cross-Cultural Communication - 3

WRT 430 Grant Writing - 3

____

Cognate Total - 9

Minor - 18

Elective credits Total - 9

____

Degree Total - 128

LIBERAL STUDIES MAJOR (LIBS) BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Offered through the ORU Online and Lifelong Learning Department. Students must complete 63 credit hours in two or three areas of emphasis. Of the 63 hours, at least 45 must be from upper division courses (300 and/or 400 level.)

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (lecture and lab) - 8

(Choice of two of the following lecture/lab pairs: BIO 101/101L, CHE 101/101L, PSC 101/101L)

Mathematics (MAT 105 or 232) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101 - 3

Humanities - 12 (HUM 103, 222, 233, 244)

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244, PSY 201, SOC 101, SOC 201.

Health and Physical Education** - 4 (HPE 001, 002, 101, 102)

____

General Education Total - 55

Major

Area of Emphasis #1 - 15-42

              499 Senior Paper/Project - 3 (paper must be completed in Area of Emphasis #1).

Area of Emphasis #2 - 18-42

Area of Emphasis #3* - 0-27

____

Major Total - 63

Elective credits Total - 10

____

Degree Total - 128

 

*Minimum of 18 hours required if Emphasis #3 is opted.

  

SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATION MAJOR (SOSE) WITH SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHING LICENSURE BACHELOR OF ARTS

Students in this major should keep in close contact with the Social Studies Education faculty advisor to learn of any recent changes in state teaching certification requirements.

Students may earn licensure in a second subject/content area. The Oklahoma Commission for Teacher Preparation requires the OSAT/OPTE test(s) be passed in order to obtain a license in an additional subject/content area. Students interested in completing coursework toward additional licensing should consult the subject area advisor.

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (1 biological and 1 physical) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

Social Science (SOC 323) - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, MAT 315.

Health and Physical Education - 4.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, Basic First Aid/CPR, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 55.5

*At least one course must be chosen from courses with asterisks.

Major

BUS 201 Principles of Economics I - 3

GOV 101 American Government and Politics - 3

GOV 331 Western Political Theory - 3

HIS 101 American History - 3

HIS 201 Historiography - 3

HIS 310 Oklahoma History - 3

HIS 490 Cultural Geography - 3

HIS 499 Senior Paper - 3

IS 301 Global Perspectives in the Modeern World - 3

PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology - 3

Choice of three courses from the following - 9

HIS 340 Colonial America to Early National

HIS 343 Civil War and Reconstruction

HIS 344 Early Modern United States:1877-1929 Gilded Age to World War I

HIS 345 U.S. Since 1929

Choice of two courses from the following -6

HIS 323 The Middle Ages and the Reformation (476-1650)

HIS 324 Modern Europe (1815 to Present)

HIS 425 Eastern European History

Choice of one course from the following - 3

HIS 361 Colonial Latin America

HIS 381 Modern China and Japan

HIS 473 The Rise of Modern Israel

____

Major Total- 48

Professional Education

HIS 477 Secondary Methods: Social Studies - 3

PED 100 Education Seminar (every semester) - 0

PED 121 Field Base Experience/Practicum (Secondary) - 1

PED 203 Foundations & Methods of Education - 3

PED 222 School Health Care - 1

PED 305 Pedagogy I - 4

PED 306 Pedagogy II - 4

PED 361 Professional Education Seminar/ Portfolio - 0

PED 485 Student Teaching: 7-9 - 5

PED 495 Student Teaching: 10-12 - 5

____

Professional Education Total - 26

____

Degree Total - 129.5

  

Leadership Studies Major (LEAD) Bachelor of Science

The degree plan for residential students (LEAD) is listed here. Students choosing either option should consult with an advisor from the History, Humanities, and Government Department.
General EducatioN

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (lecture and lab) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105 or 232) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222*, 233*, 244*, 333*, 250, 255, 260, 270, MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3

Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244, MUS 208, PSY 201, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, SWK 202.

Health and Physical Education - 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 56

*At least one course must be chosen from courses marked with asterisks.

Major Area #1 Leadership Studies

CHRM 302 Christian Leadership - 3

COM 300 Organizational Communication - 3

COM 410 Discussion and Conference Leadership - 3

COM 412 Training and Development - 3

COM 446 Business/Professional Speech - 3

GOV 341 Public Administration - 3

GOV 369 Protocol and Diplomacy - 3

GOV 461 Public Policy Analysis - 3

IS 301 Global Perspectives in the Modern World - 3

IS 340 Needs Assessment or IS 341 Program Evaluation - 3

LEAD 399 Leadership Studies Practicum - 3

LEAD 499 Senior Paper in Leadership Studies - 3

WRT 430 Grant Writing - 3

____

Area #1 Total - 39

Area #2** Total - 24

____

Major Total - 63

Elective credits Total - 9

____

Degree Total - 128

**The student’s choice of area #2 studies needs approval from the History, Humanities, and Goverment Department chair.

  

Government Minor (GOVM)

GOV 201 Introduction to Political Science - 3

GOV 331 Western Political Theory - 3

GOV 335 Christian Faith & Gov: Theory - 3

GOV Electives - 6

Choice of one of the following courses - 3

GOV 305 Comparative Government

GOV 381 American Foreign Policy

___

Minor Total - 18

History Minor (HISM)

The minor in history is 18 hours of upper-division history courses.

Minor Total - 18

International Relations Minor (INRM)

GOV 201 Introduction to Political Science - 3

GOV 311 International Relations - 3

HIS Elective from Europe or Middle East - 3

HIS Elective from Asia or Latin America - 3

Choice of two courses from the following - 6

GOV 305 Comparative Government

GOV 370 Area Studies

GOV 381 American Foreign Policy

GOV 391 International Political Economy

GOV 479 Readings in Government

GOV 488 Model United Nations Internship

____

Minor Total - 18

 Humanities Minor (HUMM)

Humanities at ORU emphasizes a way of seeing and a method of studying human cultural expressions and activities. We believe that the worldview and resultant image of man that are widespread in a given time and place are the dominant forces that shape political theory and institutions, social and economic activities and patterns, and other cultural forms. In turn, these institutions, patterns, forms, and ideas modify the worldview in dynamic ways.

The humanities minor can help students grasp the interrelations in a culture among assumptions, ideas, and actions. Such a way of seeing can help parents, lawyers, teachers, pastors, businessmen, doctors, and missionaries understand the multiple forces that are shaping their own lives, the lives of their children, and the people whom they serve. The humanities minor can enrich the life and service of any person.

 

HUM 103 Christian Worldview and Culture - 3

HUM 222 Ancient and Medieval Humanities - 3

HUM 233 Renaissance & Enlightenment Humanities - 3

HUM 244 Romantic and Modern Humanities - 3

 Choice of two of the following courses - 6

HUM 250 Art History I

HUM 255 Art History II

HUM 260 Music Appreciation

HUM 270 Introduction to Theatre

HUM 300 Cultural Periods

HUM 333 Humanities Travel Studies

HUM 350 Area Studies

HUM 400 Major Figures

HUM 450 Thematic Readings

HUM 490 Integrative Seminar

____

Minor Total - 18

 

Note: Appropriate courses from associated departments are made available by crosslisting. The humanities advisor may be consulted about other options. One or, in special cases, two related courses from cognate subjects may be counted within the requirements for the humanities minor when approved by the humanities advisor.

Israel and Middle East Studies Minor (ISRM)

BIB 455 Intensive Studies: Jewish Roots of Christianity - 3

HEB 305 Hebrew Culture and Civilization - 3

HIS 371 Islamic Middle East - 3

HIS 472 Twentieth Century Middle East - 3

HIS 473 The Rise of Modern Israel - 3

Choice of one of the following courses - 3

BIB 302 Historical Geography of the Holy Land 

BIB 455 Intensive Studies: Introduction to Jewish Literature 

BIB 455 Intensive Studies: Second Temple Period Archaeology from 1968 to Present

HIS 372 Ancient Near East

HIS 452 Department Seminar: Europe 

HIS 453 Department Seminar: Middle East 

HIS 479 Readings in History

HEB 306 Business Hebrew*

HONR 301 Faith and Civilization in Context**

____

Minor Total - 18

*HEB 204 is a prerequisite.

**For honors students only.

Prelaw Minor (PLM)

Studemts must complete 18 hours from the following courses. A minimum grade of “C” or higher is required. Courses may not be repeated for credit towards the minor.

BUS 325 Business Law I - 3

BUS 326 Business Law II - 3

COM 309 Argumentation and Persuasion - 3

COM 400 Debate and Forensic Team - 3

GOV 299 Introduction to Law - 3

GOV 450 American Jurisprudence - 3

GOV 451 American Constitutional Law - 3

GOV 452 Civil Liberties, Civil Rights, and Social Justice - 3

GOV 453 Criminal Law and Procedure - 3

GOV 454 Legal Policy and Process (online only) - 3

GOV 455 Trial Advocacy - 3

GOV 457 International Law - 3

GOV 458 Legal Skills Internship - 3

GOV 459 Legal Research and Writing - 3

GOV 487 OIL Internship - 3

____

Minor Total - 18

Aerospace Studies Minor (ASM)

AERO 1111 Foundations of the U.S. Air Force - 1

AERO 1211 U.S. Air Force Air and Space Power - 1

AERO 2111 Evolution of Air and Space Power - 1

AERO 2211 History of Air Power - 1

AERO 3103 Leadership in the U.S. Air Force - 3

AERO 3203 Company Grade Leadership - 3

AERO 3504 Field Training (completed in the summer) - 4

AERO 4103 National Security Affairs I - 3

AERO 4203 National Security Affairs II - 3

____

Minor Total - 20

   

  

Departmental Courses

Descriptions of the courses listed below are in the section titled Course Descriptions at the end of this catalog. Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order by the prefix.

Government

GOV 101 American Government and Politics

GOV 201 Introduction to Political Science

GOV 299 Introduction to Law

GOV 305 Comparative Government

GOV 311 International Relations

GOV 321 Legislative Process

GOV 322 Political Parties and Elections

GOV 323 American Political Leadership

GOV 331 Western Political Theory

GOV 335 Christian Faith and Government: Theory

GOV 336 Christian Faith and Government: Practicum

GOV 341 Public Administration

GOV 369 Protocol and Diplomacy

GOV 370 Area Studies

GOV 381 American Foreign Policy

GOV 391 International Political Economy

GOV 449 Political Science Research Methods

GOV 450 American Jurisprudence

GOV 451 American Constitutional Law

GOV 452 Civil Liberties, Civil Rights, and Social Justice

GOV 453 Criminal Law and Procedure

GOV 454 Legal Policy and Process

GOV 455 Trial Advocacy

GOV 457 International Law

GOV 458 Legal Skills Internship

GOV 459 Legal Research and Writing

GOV 461 Public Policy Analysis

GOV 479 Readings in Government

GOV 487 Oklahoma Intercollegiate Legislature Internship

GOV 488 Model United Nations Internship

GOV 489 American Studies Internship

GOV 499 Senior Paper/Project

GOV 999 Elective

History

HIS 101 American History Survey

HIS 201 Historiography

HIS 310 Oklahoma History

HIS 477 Secondary Methods: Social Studies

HIS 479 Readings in History

HIS 490 Department Seminar

HIS 491 History Internship

HIS 499 Senior Paper/Project

HIS 999 Elective

 

Asia/Middle East History

HIS 371 Islamic Middle East

HIS 372 Ancient Near East

HIS 381 Modern China and Japan

HIS 382 History of India and Southeast Asia

HIS 472 Twentieth Century Middle East

HIS 473 The Rise of Modern Israel

HIS 483 Contemporary Asia, 1945 to Present

 

European History

HIS 323 The Middle Ages and the Reformation, 476-1650

HIS 324 Modern Europe, 1815 to Present

HIS 425 Eastern European History

 

Latin American History

HIS 361 Colonial Latin America

HIS 362 Survey of Latin America

HIS 464 The Caribbean, Mexico, and Central America

U.S. History

HIS 340 Colonial America to Early National, 1607 to 1830

HIS 343 Civil War and Reconstruction U.S., 1830-1877

HIS 344 Early Modern United States, 1877-1929: Gilded Age to World War I

HIS 345 United States Since 1929 Intellectual History

HIS 351 Evangelical and Charismatic Christianity in America

 

Humanities

HUM 103 Christian Worldview and Culture

HUM 222 Ancient and Medieval Humanities

HUM 233 Renaissance and Enlightenment Humanities

HUM 244 Romantic and Modern Humanities

HUM 250 Art History I

HUM 255 Art History II

HUM 260 Music Appreciation

HUM 270 Introduction to Theatre

HUM 300 Cultural Periods

HUM 333 Humanities Travel Studies

HUM 350 Area Studies

HUM 400 Major Figures

HUM 450 Thematic Readings

HUM 490 Integrative Seminar

HUM 999 Elective

International Studies

IS 301 Global Perspectives in the Modern World

IS 350 Internship in International Studies

IS 361 Foundations of International/ Community Development

IS 370 Problems in International/ Community Development

IS 391 Seminar in International/ Community Development

IS 440 Global Perspectives

IS 462 Needs Assessment and Program Evaluation

IS 499 Senior Seminar and Paper

IS 999 Elective

 

Leadership Studies

LEAD 399 Leadership Studies Practicum

LEAD 499 Senior Paper in Leadership Studies

LEAD 999 Elective

  

Music Department

John Jenkins, D.M.A., Chair

MISSION STATEMENT: Within a Christian, charismatic environment, the primary mission of the Music Department is to provide students with an excellent undergraduate foundation in music, as well as a strong emphasis on music's past, present, and future prospects. In this context, the general purposes of the department are (1) to provide opportunities for students to develop their music capabilities and interests through the use of music as a socializing force, as an aid to compassionate understanding of themselves and their environment and as an avenue of self-expression; (2) to stimulate an appreciation and love for music through the study of its various disciplines; (3) to develop techniques for mature evaluation of musical standards; (4) to give an adequate background for further study in graduate schools; (5) to cultivate tools for teaching in public and private schools, teaching in private studios, performing in professional music organizations, and working in related music fields; and (6) to prepare for various ministries in the global church.

 

Overview

The Music Department of Oral Roberts University offers a wide variety of music programs ranging from instrumental and vocal to technology, worship, and music therapy. The ORU Music Department is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) 11250 Roger Bacon Dr Ste 21 Reston, VA 20190, email info@arts-accredit.org, Phone: 703-437-0700, Fascimile: 703-437-6312, website: http://nasm.arts-accredit.org. ORU is also an American Music Therapy Association approved University and became an “All Steinway School” in spring 2011.

 

Degree Programs

The Music Department offers four degree programs: the bachelor of arts (music arts major), the bachelor of music (music composition, music performance, and music therapy), the bachelor of music education (music education major), and a bachelor of science degree (music production and worship arts major).

These degree programs involve all of the significant areas of music study, such as music theory, sight singing and ear training, history and literature of music, music-teaching methods, and all fields of applied music and performance.

More information on all degree programs is available from the music department and music.oru.edu.

Music Arts (B.A.)

Students with this major choose to specialize in either arts or pre-medicine. The arts concentration can be completed in three years by following the degree-in-three plan sheet. More information is available from the Music Department and at music.oru.edu.

 

Music Composition (B.M.)

Music composition majors choose between a concentration in composition, composition with music production or composition with film scoring.

 

Music Performance (B.M.)

Students in the music performance major choose a concentration in instrumental, keyboard, or vocal music.

 

Music Production (B.S.)

Students in this major can choose to spend one semester of their junior year at The Recording Studio in Chillicothe, Ohio, an education complex that specializes in training audio engineers. Students may also choose to attend the Contemporary Music Center in Tennessee or take a block of music industry courses on campus.

 

Music Therapy (B.M.)

Music Therapy majors are trained to be performers as well as music therapy clinicans. The music therapy degree culminates in a senior recital and a semester long music therapy internship under the supervision of a certified music therapist.

 

Worship Arts (B.S.)

Students in this major study the history and practice of worship and complete an internship in a local church under a worship pastor. The Worship Arts major has a choice of five concentrations: dance, music production, ethnomusicology, theology, and theatre. This degree can be completed in three years by following the degree-in-three plan sheet. More information is available from the Music Department and at music.oru.edu.

 

Music Education (B.M.E.)

Students seeking vocal or instrumental licensure to teach at the K-12 levels need to complete the music education major, which leads to standard certification. Students interested in a teaching license should work closely with the music education advisor in the Music Department as well as with the ORU College of Education.

 

Degree in Three

The Music Department offers two degrees that industrious students can complete in three years: the B.A. degree in Music Arts and the B.S. degree in Worship Arts. Completing a major in three years usually involves taking courses in the summers, including the summer before a student’s freshman year. Degree plan sheets that show how the degrees can be completed in three years are available in the Music Department and at http://degreeplansheets.oru.edu.

 

Minors

The Music Department also offers the following minors: ethnomusicology, music, music production, fine arts technology, and worship leadership. Each minor is a minimum of 18 credit hours.

  

Enrollment Information

Admission Requirements

Prospective students must meet the general admission requirements for Oral Roberts University described in the university catalog. Admission to the music program requires a separate application with the Music Department and an audition. Applicants are notified of their acceptance to the university by the Admissions Office; they are notified of acceptance (via email) as a music major or worship leadership minor by the Music Department after their audition.

 

Performance

Music majors must demonstrate continuous growth in ability to perform on a major instrument. Recitals are regularly presented, affording students opportunities to appear as soloists. As with all ORU seniors, music majors are required to prepare a culminating activity: a recital, project, paper, or an internship. Performance majors present a full recital in the senior year, after successfully presenting a half recital in the junior year.

Bachelor of music composition majors make several presentations of original compositions in junior and senior recitals. A bachelor of arts candidate prepares a senior project, paper, or recital. Music education majors may elect to present a music education recital or a senior/paper project, each for two credit hours. A lecture recital option is also available and does not require a junior recital as a prerequisite.

 

Course Credits

For all applied lessons, a weekly 25-minute lesson receives one credit hour for the semester, and a weekly 50-minute lesson receives two hours of credit.

For ensembles, a class receiving one hour of credit may meet from one to five times per week.

 

Fees

Each semester, all music majors are charged an inclusive $250 fee. Non-music majors who take applied lessons are assessed a $250 applied music lesson fee for each credit hour taken (e.g., $500 for two credit hours). Two additional fees include the music instrument use fee, which is a $55 fee charged each semester for the use of university-owned musical instruments and equipment, and the music ensemble fee, a $40 fee charged each semester to each student enrolled in an ensemble.

 

Grade Requirements

All courses in the major, concentration, and cognate must be passed with at least a “C.” In addition, MUS 205, 206, 208, and 300--if required--must also be passed with a “C” or better. If that grade requirement is not met, the student must retake the respective class.

 

Policy on Repeating a Course

All music theory courses--including MUS 100, 101, 102, 103, and 104--may be repeated only one time.

 

Music Seminar

All music majors (with the exception of Worship Arts Majors, see Worship Seminar below) must enroll and successfully complete at least 2 credit hours of MUS 099 Music Seminar, but must be enrolled in and earn at least a “C” in the class for seven semesters; minors must pass for four semesters. After the 2 credit hours are attained, MUS 099 is taken for 0 credit. As part of the requirement, music majors and minors must attend a designated number of recitals and concerts and perform in class at least once per semester. Transfer music majors must earn at least a “C” in Music Seminar every semester they are enrolled as majors (a minimum of four semesters and up to seven semesters). Transfer music minors must pass Music Seminar at ORU for at least two semesters. If they attend ORU for three semesters, they must pass Music Seminar for all three semesters, and if they attend ORU for four or more semesters, they must pass Music Seminar for four semesters.

 

Worship Seminar

Worship Arts majors must enroll in and successfully complete Music Seminar for 0 credits during their first four semesters. After, worship arts majors must enroll in and successfully complete at least 2 credit hours of MUS 098 Worship Seminar with at least a “C.”

 

Ensemble Requirement

Music majors are required to participate in an appropriate major ensemble every regular semester of enrollment. Students are placed in a major ensemble by audition. Major ensembles include the following:

• For vocalists: University Chorale and Chamber Singers

• For string players: Orchestra

• For wind and percussion: Wind Ensemble

Keyboardists and guitarists may enroll in any of the above ensembles as approved by their advisors. Guitar majors may use guitar ensemble for four semesters to count toward major ensemble credit. Jazz Combos, Jazz Ensembles and Opera Theatre students can receive up to two credits for participation in these groups out of the eight semesters of performance group credits required.

 

Proficiency

All students majoring in music, including transfer students, must pass the ORU piano proficiency and music vocabulary proficiency. Advisors acquaint their advisees with the requirements of these proficiency examinations and, if necessary, may recommend remedial work in piano class to assist them with the piano proficiency. All bachelor of music education candidates must pass a guitar proficiency in addition to the piano and vocabulary proficiencies before they can begin student teaching. Music therapy majors must also pass the guitar proficiency in addition to piano and music vocabulary.

 

Health and Safety Standards

The Music Department provides ORU students and faculty with basic information about the maintenance of health and safety within the contexts of practice, performance, teaching, and listening.

 

Clubs and Organizations

Collegiate Music Educators National Conference (CMENC). This organization focuses on music education but is open to all music majors. It sponsors many of the music activities that occur on and off campus and is a great networking tool for any person who desires a career in music.

Student Music Therapy Association (SMTA). This organization is for music therapy majors. Its purpose is to build a community, raise awareness and help provide students with a scholarship to reach regional and national conferences. At these conferences, students can sit in on research, netwok and present their own research. The group also helps students to network with other professionals within the community and listens to testimonies for educational purposes.

 

Special Opportunities

Music Production (MPRO) students can spend a semester of their junior year at The Recording Workshop in Chillicothe, Ohio, an education complex that specializes in training audio engineers. The Recording Workshop’s primary educational goal is to teach the creative operation of professional audio recording equipment. Students experience this teaching by spending extensive time in audio control rooms at the complex.

Music students may also choose to spend a semester at the Contemporary Music Center in Nashville, Tennessee. The program offers students the opportunity to study and work with faculty and music industry experts who share an interest in making and marketing contemporary music. The program is for any student considering a career in the music industry, both the art and the business. Department approval is required in order to receive credit.

 

Awards and Scholarships

Outstanding Student Awards. In recognition of scholarship, leadership, and ORU lifestyle commitment, the Music Department annually honors graduating seniors with the presentation of Outstanding Student Awards in the department’s majors: music arts, music composition, music performance, worship arts, and music education.

Scholarships offered by the music department are awarded on the basis of acceptance into the program by audition and participation in ensembles.

  

Music ARTS Major (MUA) Bachelor of Arts

Students with this major choose a concentration in either arts or pre-medicine.

Students choosing the pre-med concentration need to follow the music major requirements specific for the pre-med option because it differs from the music major requirements for the arts concentrations.

General EducatioN (pre-med concentration)

Introduction to Whole Person Education - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters of French or German including 203) - 6                                        

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Mathematics (MAT 106 or 201) - 3-4

Laboratory Science (BIO 111 and BIO 112 lecture and lab) - 8

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Social Science (MUS 208)* - 3

History and Literature of Music I and II (MUS 205, MUS 206)* - 8

Humanities - 6

HUM 103 plus one of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 333, 250, 255, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315.

Health and Physical Education - 4.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total -  63.5

*A Grade of "C" or better is required.

Major (pre-med concentration)

MUS 099 Music Seminar* - 2

MUS 026-047, 050, 052-055 Applied Music: Primary - 8

MUS 061-065, 067-075, 080, 085-086 Performance Groups (every semester) - 8

MUS 101 Harmony I - 2

MUS 102 Harmony II - 2

MUS 103 Sight Singing and Ear Training I -2

MUS 104 Sight Singing and Ear Training II - 2

MUS 105 Introduction to Music Production  -1

MUS 333 Conducting I - 2

PRFM 100 Piano Proficiency**  - 0

PRFM 101 Music Vocabulary Proficiency - 0

Choice of one of the following - 3

MUS 421 Senior Recital***

MUS 499 Senior Paper/Project

Choice of one of the following - 3

MUS 201 Harmony, Sight Singing, & Ear Training III

MUS 301 Form and Analysis

MUS 302 Orchestration

MUS 443 Conducting II: Choral

MUS 444 Conducting II: Instrumental

MUS Music Production elective

____

Major Total - 35

*Students must complete seven semesters of MUS 099 and earn at least 2 credit hours with a grade of "C" or better.

**Applied Piano or Class Piano must be taken until completion of PRFM 100.

***Students choosing this option must take MUS 399 Junior Recital as a prerequisite.

Premed Concentration (MPMC)

CHE 111 General Chemistry I (lecture/lab) - 4

CHE 112 General Chemistry II (lecture/lab) - 4

CHE 211 Organic Chemistry I (lecture/lab) - 4

CHE 212 Organic Chemistry II (lecture/lab) - 4

CHE 459 General Biochemistry I (lecture/lab) - 4

BIO Biology lecture and lab elective - 4

MAT 332 Biostatistics - 3

PHP 100 Pre-Health Professions Seminar - 1

Choice of one of the following - 4

PHY 101 General Physics I (lecture and lab)

PHY 111 General Physics I (lecture and lab)

Choice of one of the following - 4

PHY 102 Physics II (lecture and lab)

PHY 112 Physics II (lecture and lab)

____

Pre-med Concentration Total - 36

Degree Total with Pre-medicine Concentration - 134.5

GENERAL EDUCATION (arts CONCENTRATION)

Introduction to Whole Person Education - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters of French or German including 203) - 6                                        

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

Laboratory Science (BIO, CHE, PHY or PSC lecture and lab) - 8

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Social Science (MUS 208)* - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103 plus three of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 333, 250, 255, 270, COMP 101, MAT 315.

Health and Physical Education - 4.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total -  61.5

*A Grade of "C" or better is required.

 

Major (arts concentration)

MUS 099 Music Seminar* - 2

MUS 101 Harmony I - 2

MUS 102 Harmony II - 2

MUS 103 Sight Singing and Ear Training I - 2

MUS 104 Sight Singing and Ear Training II - 2

PRFM 100 Piano Proficiency** - 0

PRFM 101 Music Vocabulary Proficiency - 0

Choice of one of the following - 3

MUS 421 Senior Recital***

MUS 499 Senior Paper/Project

____

Major Total - 13

*Students must complete seven semesters of MUS 099 and earn at least 2 credit hours with a grade of "C" or better.

**Applied Piano or Class Piano must be taken until completion of PRFM 100.

***Students choosing this option must take MUS 399 Junior Recital as a prerequisite.

 

 

 

 

Arts Concentration (MAC)

MUS 026-047, 052-055 Applied Music: Primary - 8

MUS MUS 061-065, 067-075, 080, 085-086 Performance Groups - 8

MUS 105 Introduction to Music Production - 1

MUS 205 History and Literature of Music I - 4

MUS 206 History and Literature of Music II - 4

MUS 333 Conducting I - 2

Choice of one of the following - 3

MUS 201 Harmony, Sight Singing, & Ear Training III

MUS 301 Form and Analysis

MUS 302 Orchestration

____

Arts Concentration Total - 30

Minor# - 18

Elective credits Total - 8

____

Degree Total with Arts Concentration - 130.5

**If three hours are taken, one counts toward elective hours.

# Music students choosing a business minor designed for music majors can find requirements for the minor in the Undergraduate Business Department section of this catalog.

 

  

MUSIC THERAPY MAJOR (MSTH) BACHELOR OF MUSIC

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

History and Literature of Music (MUS 205, 206)* - 8

Humanities (HUM 103, MUS 208*) - 6

Laboratory Science (BIO lecture and lab) or Mathematics - 3-4

Applied Anatomy and Physiology (HLSS 319) - 4

American History (HIS 101) - 3

Government (GOV 101) - 3

Social Science (PSY 201) - 3

Health and Physical Education - 5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 53-54

*A grade of "C" or higher must be earned.

Major

MUS 099 Music Seminar - 2                                      (A total of 7 semesters must be completed with with a grade of "C" or better in 2 credit hours)

MUS 026-047 Applied Music: Primary - 12

MUS 004, 125-127 Applied Music: Secondary - 4 (piano)

MUS 061-075, 080-087) Performance Groups - 6

MUS 101 Harmony I - 2

MUS 102 Harmony II - 2

MUS 103 Sight Singing and Ear Training I - 2

MUS 104 Sight Singing and Ear Training II - 2

MUS 105 Intro to Music Production - 1

MUS 201 Harmony, Sight Singing, and Ear - 3 Training II

MUS 202 Harmony, Sight Singing, and Ear - 3 Training IV

MUS 333 Conducting I - 2

MUS 421 Senior Recital - 2

PRFM 100 Piano Proficiency ** - 0

PRFM 101 Music Vocabulary Proficiency - 0

PRFM 102 Guitar Proficiency - 0

Choice of three of the following courses - 3

MUS 004 Voice

MUS 005 Guitar

MUS 023 Percussion

MUS 131 Class Voice

MUS 135 Class Guitar I

MUS 136 Class Guitar II

____

Major Total - 46

**Applied Piano or Class Piano must be taken until completion of PRFM 100.

Concentration

MUT 153 Introduction to Music Therapy - 2

MUT 156 Clinical Orientation - 1

MUT 203 Psychology of Music - 3

MUT 256 Instr. Skills in Music Therapy - 1

MUT 303 Music Therapy I: Developmental - 2

MUT 306 Clinical I: Developmental - 1

MUT 353 Music Therapy II: Geriatric - 2

MUT 356 Clinical II: Geriatric - 1

MUT 403 Music Therapy III: Psychiatric - 2

MUT 406 Clinical III: Psychiatric - 1

MUT 453 Music Therapy IV: Med/Rehab - 2

MUT 456 Clinical IV: Med/Rehab - 1

MUT 470 Music Therapy Research & Methods - 3

MUT 480 Music Therapy Internship - 3

PSY 301 Developmental Psychology - 3

PSY 338 Psychology of Abnormal Behavior - 3

____

Concentration Total - 31

____

Degree Total - 130-131

MUSIC COMPOSITION MAJOR (MUCO) BACHELOR OF MUSIC

Music composition majors choose between a concentration in composition, film scoring or production.

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Foreign Language (French or German) - 3

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Mathematics or Laboratory Science  - 3-4

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Social Science (MUS 208)* - 3

History and Literature of Music (MUS 205, 206)* - 8

Humanities - 6

HUM 103, plus one of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 250, 255, 270, 333, COMP 101, MAT 315)

Health and Physical Education - 4.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 52.5-53.5

*A grade of "C" or higher must be earned.

Major

MUS 026-047, 050, 052-055 Applied Music: Primary - 6

MUS 048 Applied Music: Composition - 6

MUS 061-065, 067-075, 080-086           Performance Groups - 8

MUS 099 Music Seminar - 2                                      (Students must complete 7 semesters with a grade of "C" or better in 2 credit hours)

MUS 101 Harmony I - 2

MUS 102 Harmony II - 2

MUS 103 Sight Singing and Ear Training I - 2

MUS 104 Sight Singing and Ear Training II - 2

MUS 105 Introduction to Music Technology - 1

MUS 201 Harmony, Sight Singing, and Ear    Training III - 3

MUS 202 Harmony, Sight Singing, and Ear                  Training IV - 3

MUS 301 Form and Analysis - 2

MUS 302 Orchestration - 2

MUS 333 Conducting I - 2

MUS 399 Junior Recital - 2

MUS 401 Principles of Counterpoint - 2

MUS 341 Brass and Percussion Instruments - 1

MUS 342 Woodwind Instruments - 1

MUS 441 String Instruments - 1

PRFM 100 Piano Proficiency** - 0

PRFM 101 Music Vocabulary Proficiency - 0

Choice of four hours from the following - 4

MUS 001-023 Applied Music: Secondary

MUS 125-127 Class Piano I-III

MUS 131 Class Voice

MUS 135-136 Class Guitar

____

Major Total - 54

**Applied Piano or Class Piano must be taken until completion of PRFM 100.

composition (MUcC)

MUS 335 Composition I - 2

MUS 337 Composition: Small Ensembles - 3

MUS 338 20th Century Composition Materials - 3

MUS 421 Senior Recital - 3

MUS 431 Coposition: Advanced Studies-Ensembles - 3

Composition Concentration Total - 14

 

Film Scoring (MUFC)

MUS 049 Applied Audio Workstation - 2

MUS 315 Music for Film and Other Media - 3

MUS 328 Orchestration for Film - 3

MUS 360 Advanced Film Music - 3

Choice of one of the following courses - 3

MUS 421 Senior Recital

MUS 499 Senior Paper/Project

Film Scoring Concentration Total - 14

 

Production (MUTC)

Choice of production courses - 9

MUS 025, 049 Applied Audio Workstation

MUS 310 Studies in Advanced Music Prod*

MUS 313 Digital Audio Workstation

MUS 315 Music for Film and Other Media

MUS 335 Composition I

Choice of one of the following courses - 3

MUS 421 Senior Recital

MUS 499 Senior Paper/Project

Production Concentration Total - 14

Elective credits Total - 11

____

Degree Total - 131.5-132.5

*Students may take MUS 310 more than once if different content is covered each time.

MUSIC PERFORMANCE MAJOR (MUP) BACHELOR OF MUSIC

Music performance majors choose between a concentration in instrumental, keyboard or vocal performance.

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Foreign Language (French or German) - 3-6    (non-vocal primaries complete 3 hours, vocal primaries complete 6 hours)

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Mathematics or Laboratory Science - 3-4          (BIO, CHE, PHY, PSC  lecture and lab or MAT 105)

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Social Science* (MUS 208) - 3

History and Literature of Music (MUS 205, 206)* - 8

Humanities - 6

HUM 103, plus one of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 250, 255, 270, 333, COMP 101, MAT 315)

Health and Physical Education - 4.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

Non-Vocal General Education Total - 52.5-53.5

Vocal General Education Total - 55.5-56.5

*A grade of "C" or higher must be earned.

Major

MUS 061-065, 067-075, 080-086 - 8   Performance Groups

MUS 099 Music Seminar - 2                                                (Students must complete 7 semesters with a grade of "C" or better for 2 credit hours)

MUS 101 Harmony I - 2

MUS 102 Harmony II - 2

MUS 103 Sight Singing and Ear Training I - 2

MUS 104 Sight Singing and Ear Training II - 2

MUS 105 Introduction to Music Technology - 1

MUS 201 Harmony, Sight Singing, and Ear                    Training III - 3

MUS 202 Harmony, Sight Singing, and Ear                    Training IV - 3

MUS 301 Form and Analysis - 2

MUS 302 Orchestration - 2

MUS 333 Conducting I - 2

MUS 335 Composition I - 2

MUS 401 Principles of Counterpoint - 2

MUS Music elective -  0-2                                    (required for non-vocal concentration only)

PRFM 100 Piano Proficiency** - 0

PRFM 101 Music Vocabulary Proficiency - 0

One of the two following courses -2

MUS 443 Conducting II: Choral

MUS 444 Conducting II: Instrumental

____

Non-Vocal Major Total - 39

Vocal Major Total - 37

**Applied Piano or Class Piano must be taken until completion of PRFM 100.

Note: Students with this major choose one of the following three concentrations.

Instrumental (MPIC)

MUS 031-047, 050, 052, 054, 055 Applied Music: Primary - 12

MUS 001-023, 125-127, 131, 135, 136 Applied Music: Secondary - 4

MUS 326 Instrumental Pedagogy/Repertoire - 1

MUS 341 Brass and Percussion Instruments - 1

MUS 342 Woodwind Instruments - 1

MUS 399 Junior Recital - 2

MUS 421 Senior Recital - 3

MUS 441 String Instruments Class - 1

____

Instrumental Concentration Total - 25

 

Keyboard (MKC)

MUS 026-027 Applied Music: Primary - 12

MUS 004-023, 131, 135-136 Applied Music: Secondary - 4

MUS 327 Keyboard Pedagogy and Repertoire - 1

MUS 341 Brass and Percussion Instruments - 1

MUS 342 Woodwind Instruments - 1

MUS 399 Junior Recital - 2

MUS 421 Senior Recital - 3

MUS 441 String Instruments - 1

____

Keyboard Concentration Total - 25

 

Vocal (MVC)

MUS 029 Applied Music: Primary - 12

MUS 001,125-127, 135-136 Applied Music: Secondary - 4

MUS 241 Phonetics - 1

MUS 242 Diction for Singers - 2

MUS 325 Vocal Pedagogy and Repertoire - 1

MUS 399 Junior Recital - 2

MUS 421 Senior Recital - 3

____

Vocal Concentration Total - 25

Non-Vocal majors elective credits Total - 12

Vocal majors elective credits Total - 11

____

Degree Total - 128.5-129.5

MUSIC PRODUCTION MAJOR (MPRO) BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (BIO, CHE, PHY or PSC)  lecture and lab - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Social Science (MUS 208)**** - 3

Music Appreciation (MUS 300)**** - 3

Humanities - 9

HUM 103 plus two of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 250, 255, 270, 333, COMP 101, MAT 315.

Health and Physical Education* - 4.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 55.5

Major

CAM 451 Communications Internship - 3

MKT 350 Internet Marketing - 3

MUS 026-047, 050, 052-055 Primary Instrument or Voice - 6

MUS 001-023 Applied Instrument or Voice - 2

MUS 049 Applied Audio Workstation - 4

MUS 061-075, 080-086 Performance Groups** - 8

MUS 099 Music Seminar - 2                                                (Students must complete 7 semesters with a grade of "C or better in 2 credit hours)

MUS 101*** Harmony I - 2

MUS 102 Harmony II - 2

MUS 103 Sight Singing and Ear Training I - 2

MUS 104 Sight Singing and Ear Training II - 2

MUS 160 Live Sound - 2

MUS 165 Lights/Projection for Music - 2

MUS 228 Contemporary Music Theory/Lead Chart Notation - 2

MUS 260 Live Sound 2 - 2

MUS 313 Digital Audio Workstation - 3

MUS 315 Music for Film and Other Media - 3

MUS 316 Music, Distribution and Social Media - 3

MUS 320 Songwriting and Arranging - 2

MUS 460 Professional Touring - 3

PRFM 100 Piano Proficiency***** - 0

PRFM 101 Music Vocabulary Proficiency - 0

Choice of one of the following two courses - 1

MUS 105 Introduction to Music Production

MUS 106 Intermediate Music Production

Choice of the following courses/programs - 9

PRFM Contemporary Music Center OR

PRFM The Recording Workshop CORE OR

MUS 381 Sound Stage Recording AND

MUS 385 Advanced Music Production AND

MUS 289 Music Industry Practices

____

Major Total - 68

Elective credits Total - 6

____

Degree Total - 129.5

 *HPE required each semester if enrolled full-time. If student attends the CMC or CORE program during the fall or spring semester the HPE requirement for that semester is waived.

**Students must enroll in a performance group each semester, selected from MUS 061-067. Two semesters of a performance group can be chosen from MUS 070-075, 080-086.

***Fundamentals of Music (MUS 100) must be taken as a prerequisite to MUS 101 if the Theory Placement Exam is not passed. Students must pass MUS 101 and 103 before proceeding into music production courses.

****A grade of "C" or higher must be earned.

WORSHIP ARTS MAJOR (MWOR) BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Worship arts majors choose between a concentration in dance, music production, ethnomusicology, theology or theatre.

General Education

Intro to Whole Person Education - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature - 6                         (BLIT 110/120 or BIB 222/261)*

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

Laboratory Science (BIO, CHE, PHY, PSC lecture and lab) - 8

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Social Science (MUS 208)** - 3

Humanities - 12

HUM 103, 270**, MUS 300** and choice of one of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 250, 255, 333, COMP 101, MAT 315.

Health and Physical Education - 4.5

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 55.5

*Students pursuing the theology concentration must take BIB 222 and BIB 261.

**A grade of "C" or higher must be earned.

Major

MUS 004, 131 Applied Voice - 4

Choice of applied piano or guitar courses - 4

MUS 001, 124-127 Applied Piano** MUS 005, 135-136 Applied Guitar

MUS 061-075, 080-086 Peformance Groups - 8

MUS 089 Contemporary Music Ministry Ensemble (4 semesters) - 0

MUS 098 Seminar for Worship Majors - 2

MUS 099 Music Seminar (4 semesters) - 0

MUS 101 Harmony I - 2

MUS 102 Harmony II - 2

MUS 103 Sight Singing and Ear Training I - 2

MUS 104 Sight Singing and Ear Training II - 2

MUS 105 Introduction to Music Production - 1

MUS 228 Contemporary Music Theory/Lead Chart Notation - 2

MUS 309 Biblical Foundations of Worship - 3

MUS 320 Songwriting & Arranging - 2

MUS 333 Conducting I - 2

MUS 417 The Worship Service: Design and Function - 3

MUS 420 Worship Internship - 3

MUS 451 Church Music Administration - 3

MUS 452 Music in Modern Worship - 3

MUS Elective - 3

PRFM 100 Piano Proficiency** - 0

PRFM 101 Music Vocabulary Proficiency - 0

Choice of one of the following two courses - 2

MUS 207 Guitar Skills for Worship  or MUS 210 Keyboard Skills for Worship

_____

Major Total - 53

**Applied Piano or Class Piano must be taken until completion of PRFM 100.

Dance (MDAC)

DANP 230 Dance for Worship - 3

DANP Electives - 4

Choice of ballet courses from the following - 3

DANP 100 Ballet 

DANP 103 Ballet I

DANP 203 Ballet II

DANP 303 Ballet III

DANP 403 Ballet IV

Choice of modern dance courses from the following - 3

DANP 101 Modern Dance I

DANP 204 Modern Dance II

DANP 304 Modern Dance III

DANP 404 Modern Dance IV

Choice of related dance forms from the following - 2

DANP 105 Related Dance Forms I

DANP 205 Related Dance Forms II

DANP 305 Related Dance Forms III

____

Dance Concentration Total - 15

 
Music Production (MPRC)

MUS 049 Applied Audio Workstation - 4

MUS 160 Live Sound - 3

MUS 165 Lighting/Video for Music - 2

MUS 313 Digital Audio Workstation - 3

MUS 315 Music for Film and Other Media - 3

____

Music Production Concentration Total - 15

Ethnomusicology  (MUEC)

MUS 170 Cross-Cultural Worship - 3

MUS 270 Ethnomusicology in Practice - 3

MUS 370 Ethnic Music Perspectives - 3 (completed three times at 1 credit hour each semester)

SOC 101 Intro to Sociology - 3

SOC 308 Cultural Anthropology - 3

____

Ethnomusicology Concentration Total - 15 

Theology (MTHC)

THE 299 Intro to Theology - 3

BIB 306 Hermeneutics: Principles of Biblical Interpretation - 3

CHRM 305 Teaching the Bible - 3

Choice of two of the following courses - 6

CCC 315 Charismatic/Pentecostal Approaches to Counseling - 3

CHRM 302 Christian Leadership

CHRM 317 Introduction to Youth Ministry

CHRM 351 Team Ministry

CHRM 460 Church Administration

____

Theology Concentration Total - 15

 

Theatre (MTRC)

DRAM 204 Playwriting - 3

DRAM 205 Fundamentals of Acting - 3

DRAM 216 Introduction to Technical Production - 3

DRAM 336 Directing - 3

DRAM 405 Makeup Design - 3

____

Theatre Concentration Total - 15

Elective credits Total - 5

____

Degree Total - 128.5

Music Education Major (MUE) with K-12 Teaching Licensure Bachelor of Music Education

Students seeking licensure to teach at the K-12 levels need to complete the music education major, which leads to standard certification. Students interested in a teaching license should work closely with the music education advisor in the Music Department as well as with the ORU College of Education.

Students in the music education major choose a concentration in either vocal (MEVC) or instrumental (MEIC) music. Students may earn licensure in a second subject/content area or may earn both vocal and instrumental licensure. The Oklahoma Commission for Teacher Preparation requires the OSAT/OPTE test(s) be passed in order to obtain a license in an additional subject/content area. Students interested in completing coursework toward additional licensing should consult with the music education coordinator and the advisor in the second subject area. 

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101)* - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

Laboratory Science (1 biological, 1 physical - 8

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Foreign Language Proficiency PRFL 001 - 0                                                                  (exam or 102 level of a foreign language class)

Social Science (MUS 208)* 3

History and Literature of Music (MUS 205, 206)* - 8

Humanities - 6

HUM 103 plus one of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 250, 255, 270, 333, COMP 101, MAT 315)

Health and Physical Education - 4

(one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, Basic First Aid/CPR, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 57

*Must earn a “C” or higher in this course.

Major

MUS 099 Music Seminar (7 semesters) - 2

MUS 101 Harmony I - 2

MUS 102 Harmony II - 2

MUS 103 Sight Singing and Ear Training I - 2

MUS 104 Sight Singing and Ear Training II - 2

MUS 105 Introduction to Music Technology - 1

MUS 201 Harmony, Sight Singing, and Ear Training III - 3

MUS 202 Harmony, Sight Singing, and Ear Training IV - 3

MUS 302 Orchestration - 2

MUS 333 Conducting I - 2

PRFM 100 Piano Proficiency* - 0

PRFM 101 Music Vocabulary Proficiency - 0

PRFM 102 Guitar Proficiency - 0

Choice of one of the following two courses** - 2

MUS 421 Senior Recital

MUS 499 Senior Paper/Project

____

Major Total - 23

*Applied Piano or Class Piano must be taken until completion of PRFM 100.

**MUE majors have the option to perform a full recital, preceded by a junior recital, a full senior paper/project (each for 3 credit hours), to perform a music education recital without a prerequisite junior recital, or to complete a music education paper/project (each for 2 credit hours). Both of these specific music education culminating activities are to be approximately two-thirds of the full requirements. 

Instrumental (MEIC)

MUS 001, 125-127 Applied Music: Secondary (Piano) 2 courses - 2

MUS 033-047 Applied Music: Primary Instrument (5 semesters) -10

MUS 007-023 Applied Music** - 1

MUS 065, 067 Performance Groups - 7

MUS 341 Brass and Percussion Instruments - 1

MUS 342 Woodwind Instruments - 1

MUS 441 String Instruments - 1

MUS 444 Conducting II: Instrumental - 2

Choice of one of the following - 1

MUS 004 Applied Music: Voice 

MUS 131 Class Voice 

MUS 325 Voice Pedagogy and Repertoire 

____

Instrumental Concentration Total - 26

**instrumental courses should be taken before the applied lesson of choice.

Vocal (MEVC)

MUS 061, 063 Performance Groups - 7

MUS 242 Diction for Singers - 2

MUS 341 Brass and Percussion Instruments - 1

MUS 342 Woodwind Instruments - 1

MUS 441 String Instruments - 1

MUS 443 Conducting II: Choral - 2

Choice of one of the following two applied courses - 10

MUS 026 Applied Music: Piano

MUS 029 Applied Music: Voice

Choice of one of the following secondary courses - 2

MUS 001, 125-127 Applied Music: Piano

MUS 004, 131 Applied Music: Voice

____

Vocal Concentration Total - 26

Professional Education

PED 100 Education Seminar (every semester) - 0

Choice of the following two field-based courses - 1

PED 111 Field-Based Experience (Elementary)*

PED 121 Field-Based Experience (Secondary)*

PED 203 Foundations and Methods of Education* - 3

PED 222 School Health Care - 1

PED 305 Pedagogy I - 4

PED 306 Pedagogy II - 4

PED 361 Professional Education Seminar/Portfolio - 0

MEIC or MEVC courses based on concentration - 2

MUS 241 Phonetics for Singers (MEVC)

MUS 326 Instrumental Pedagogy and Repertoire (MEIC)

MUS 329 Marching Band Techniques

MUS 325 Vocal Pedagogy and Repertoire (MEVC)

PED 475 Intern/Student Teaching: Elementary - 5

PED 495 Intern/Student Teaching: 10-12 - 5

MUS 426 Elementary Music Methods and Evaluation - 3

MUS 427 Secondary Music Methods and Evaluation - 2

____

Professional Education Total - 30

____

Degree Total - 136

*Must earn a “C” or higher in this course.

 

 

minors

Ethnomusicology (MUEM)

Requirements for students majoring in another discipline are a minimum of 18 semester hours selected from the courses listed in the areas below. Students may take more hours than required in each area. Transfer students must take at least nine of the hours at ORU.

Choice of the following courses:

MUS 100 Fundamentals of Music - 3

MUS 101/103 Harmony I/Sight Singing I - 4

Music Theory Course Total - 3-4

Choice of four of the following courses:

MUS 170 Cross-Cultural Worship - 3

MUS 208 Music in World Cultures- 3

MUS 270 Ethnomusicology in Practice- 3

MUS 370 Ethnic Music Perspectives - 3            (completed three times at 1 credit hour each time)

MUS 470 Cross-Cultural Internship - 3

Ethnomusicology Course Total  - 12

Choice of one of the following courses:

ELL 415 Cross-Cultural Communication - 3

HIS _____  Area History Course - 3                          (HIS 362, 371, 381, 382, 464, 472, 473, 483).

HUM 333 Travel Studies - 3

HUM 350 Area Studies - 3

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology - 3

SOC 308 Cultural Anthropology - 3

Elective Course Total - 3

____

Minor Total - 18-19

Music (MUM)

Requirements for students majoring in another discipline are 18 semester hours selected from the courses listed in each of the areas below. Students may take more hours than required in each area. Transfer students must take at least nine of the hours at ORU.

Choice of either MUS 100 or both MUS 101/103 and MUS 102/104.

MUS 100 Fundamentals of Music - 3

MUS 101/103 Harmony I/Sight Singing - 4

MUS 102/104 Harmony II/Sight Singing - 4

Music Theory Area Total - 3 -8

Choice of either MUS 300 or both MUS 205 and MUS 206.

MUS 205 History & Literature of Music I - 4

MUS 206 History & Literature of Music II - 4 

MUS 300 Music Appreciation - 3

Music History/Literature Area Total -  3-8

Choice of the following applied music classes:

MUS 001-023 Applied Music** - 1

MUS 124-127 Class Piano - 1

MUS 135-136 Class Guitar I-II - 1

MUS 131 Class Voice - 1

**Fee required

Applied Music Area Total - 3-5

Choice of the following performance groups:

MUS 061-075, 080-086 - 1

Performance Group Area Total - 3-5

Four semesters of music seminar:

MUS 099 Music Seminar - .5

Music Seminar Area Total - 2

Choice of the following elective credits:

MUS 105 Intro to Music Production - 1

MUS 208 Music in World Cultures - 3

MUS 241 Phonetics for Singers - 1

MUS 242 Diction for Singers - 2

MUS 313 Digital Audio Workstation - 3

MUS 315 Music for Film & Other Media - 3

MUS 341 Brass & Percussion Instruments - 1

MUS 342 Woodwind Instruments Class - 1

MUS 441 String Instruments - 1

MUS 451 Church Music Administration - 1

MUS 452 Music in Modern Worship - 1

Elective Credit Total - 0-4

____

Minor Total - 18

Music Production (MPM)

Requirements for a minor for students majoring in another discipline are a minimum of 18 semester hours selected from the courses listed below. Transfer students must take at least nine of the hours at ORU.

Choice of either MUS 100 or both MUS 101/103 and MUS 102/104.

MUS 100 Fundamentals of Music - 3

MUS 101/103 Harmony I/Sight Singing - 4

MUS 102/104 Harmony II/Sight Singing - 4

Music Theory Area Total - 3 -8

Choice of either MUS 300 or both MUS 205 and MUS 206.

MUS 205 History & Literature of Music I - 4

MUS 206 History & Literature of Music II - 4 

MUS 300 Music Appreciation - 3

Music History/Literature Area Total -  3-8

Choice of the following applied music classes:

MUS 001-023 Applied Music** - 1

MUS 124-127 Class Piano - 1

MUS 135-136 Class Guitar I-II - 1

MUS 131 Class Voice - 1

**Fee required

Applied Music Area Total - 3-8

Choice of the following performance groups:

MUS 061-075, 080-086 - 2

Performance Group Area Total - 2

Four semesters of music seminar:

MUS 099 Music Seminar - .5

Couice of the Following Music Production Courses:

MUS 025 Applied Audio Workstation - 1

MUS 049 Applied Audio Workstation - 2

MUS 160 Live Sound - 2

MUS 165 Lights/Projection for Music - 2

MUS 260 Live Sound 2 - 2

MUS 313 Digital Audio Workstation - 3

MUS 315 Music for Film & Other Media - 3

MUS 316 Music Distribution and Social Media - 3

MUS 381 Sound Stage Recording - 3

MUS 389 Music Industry Practices - 3

Choice of one of the following:

MUS 105 Introduction to Music Prod - 1

MUS 106 Intermediate Music Prod - 1

Music Production area Total - 6-9

____

Minor Total - 18

Worship LeadershiP (MWLM)

The worship leadership minor contains classes in worship, improvisation, worship planning, songwriting and arranging, and leadership. Noted worship leaders participate in workshops to complement classes in the minor. Entrance requirements include an application, vocal audition, and a personal interview.

Choice of either MUS 100 or both MUS 101/103:

MUS 100 Fundamentals of Music - 3

MUS 101/103 Harmony I/Sight Singing I - 4

Music Theory Course Total - 3-4

Choice of one of the following courses:

MUS 207 Guitar Skills for Worship or      MUS 210 Keyboard Skills for Worship

Music Improvisation Course Total - 2

Choice of the following Applied Music Courses (piano, voice or guitar):

MUS 001, 004, 005 Applied Lessons**

MUS 124-127 Class Piano

MUS 131 Class Voice

MUS 135-136 Class Guitar I and II

**Fee required.

Applied Music Course Total - 3

Choice of the following Performance Groups:

MUS 061-067, 080-086 - 1

MUS 089 Contemporary Music Ministry 0

Performance Group Course Total - 4

Worship Leadership Courses:

MUS 451 Church Music Administration - 3

MUS 452 Music in Modern Worship - 3

Worship Leadership Course Total - 6

____

Minor Total - 18

*Students take MUS 100 or both MUS 101 and 103 as determined by results on the Theory Placement Exam.

Fine Arts Technology (FATM)

Students choose a total of 18 hours, nine from each of two areas. At least one course from each area must be 300 or 400 level.

Art

Choice of three of the following courses: 9

ART 101 Fundamentals of Art I

ART 213 Drawing

ART 218 Graphic Design I

ART 365 Digital Photography

___

Art Area Total - 9

 

Communication Arts

Choice of three of the following courses: 9

INT 401 Advanced Interactive Media

TVF 228 Introduction to TV Production

TVF 128 Principles of Audio Production

TVF 317 Media Analysis

TVF 318 Fundamentals of Scriptwriting

___

Communication Arts Area Total - 9

___

Minor Total - 18

 

 

Departmental Courses

Descriptions of the courses listed below are in the section titled Course Descriptions at the end of this catalog. Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order by the prefix. Courses offered are listed as “F” for the “fall,” “S” for the “spring,” and “Sum” for “summer.” “F*” and “S* indicate courses taught in even years, and “F**” and “S**” indicate courses taught in odd years. Courses with no designation are offered every semester. The department has more information.

Note: A jury is required for all applied music lessons.

Applied Music (Secondary Instrument or Voice)

MUS 001 Piano

MUS 002 Organ

MUS 003 Harpsichord

MUS 004 Voice

MUS 005 Guitar

MUS 006 Harp

MUS 007 Violin

MUS 008 Viola

MUS 009 Violoncello

MUS 010 Drum Set

MUS 011 Bass

MUS 012 Flute

MUS 013 Oboe

MUS 014 Clarinet

MUS 015 Saxophone

MUS 016 Bassoon

MUS 017 French Horn

MUS 018 Trumpet

MUS 019 Trombone

MUS 021 Baritone Horn

MUS 022 Tuba

MUS 023 Percussion

MUS 024 Composition

MUS 025 Audio Workstation

MUS 051 Arranging

 

Applied Music (Primary Instrument or Voice)

MUS 026 Piano

MUS 027 Organ

MUS 028 Harpsichord

MUS 029 Voice

MUS 031 Guitar

MUS 032 Harp

MUS 033 Violin

MUS 034 Viola

MUS 035 Violoncello

MUS 036 Bass

MUS 037 Flute

MUS 038 Oboe

MUS 039 Clarinet

MUS 040 Saxophone

MUS 041 Bassoon

MUS 042 French Horn

MUS 043 Trumpet

MUS 044 Trombone

MUS 045 Baritone Horn

MUS 046 Tuba

MUS 047 Percussion

MUS 048 Composition

MUS 049 Audio Workstation

MUS 050 Drum Set

MUS 052 Contemporary Guitar

MUS 053 Contemporary Piano

MUS 054 Contemporary Drums and Percussion

MUS 055 Contemporary Bass

MUS 059 Arranging

 

Performance Groups

MUS 061 Chamber Singers

MUS 063 University Chorale

MUS 065 Orchestra

MUS 067 Wind Ensemble

MUS 073 Opera Theatre

MUS 075 Jazz Ensemble

MUS 077 Basketball Band

MUS 080 Guitar Ensemble

MUS 081 String Ensemble

MUS 083 Brass Ensemble

MUS 085 Vocal Jazz Ensemble

MUS 086 Jazz Combo

MUS 087 Bell Ensemble

MUS 089 Contemporary Music Ministry Ensemble

Music

MUS 098 Seminar for Worship Majors

MUS 099 Music Seminar

MUS 100 Fundamentals of Music

MUS 101 Harmony I F

MUS 102 Harmony II S

MUS 103 Sight Singing and Ear Training I F

MUS 104 Sight Singing and Ear Training II S

MUS 105 Introduction to Music Production

MUS 106 Intermediate Music Production

MUS 124 Preparatory Class Piano

MUS 125 Class Piano I

MUS 126 Class Piano II

MUS 127 Class Piano III

MUS 131 Class Voice

MUS 135 Class Guitar I

MUS 136 Class Guitar II

MUS 160 Live Sound

MUS 165 Lights and Projection for Music

MUS 170 Cross-Cultural Worship

MUS 201 Harmony, Sight Singing, and Ear Training III

MUS 202 Harmony, Sight Singing, and Ear Training IV

MUS 205 History and Literature of Music I

MUS 206 History and Literature of Music II

MUS 207 Guitar Skills for Worship

MUS 208 Music in World Cultures

MUS 210 Keyboard Skills for Worship

MUS 228 Contemporary Music Theory/Lead Chart Notation F**

MUS 241 Phonetics and English Diction for Singers F*

MUS 242 Diction for Singers S**

MUS 260 Live Sound 2

MUS 270 Ethnomusicology in Practice

MUS 300 Music Appreciation

MUS 301 Form and Analysis F**

MUS 302 Orchestration F**

MUS 309 Biblical Foundations of Worship S*

MUS 310 Studies in Advanced Music Production F*

MUS 313 Digital Audio Workstation S

MUS 315 Music for Film and other Media F*

MUS 316 Music, Distribution and Social Media S*

MUS 320 Songwriting and Arranging S*

MUS 325 Vocal Pedagogy and Repertoire F*

MUS 326 Instrumental Pedagogy and Repertoire F*

MUS 327 Keyboard Pedagogy and Repertoire F*

MUS 328 Orchestration for Film Scoring

MUS 329 Marching Band Techniques F*

MUS 333 Conducting I S

MUS 335 Composition I F*

MUS 337 Composition: Small Ensembles

MUS 338 20th Century Composition Materials F**

MUS 341 Brass and Percussion Instruments Class F

MUS 342 Woodwind Instruments Class S

MUS 352 History of Musical Theatre S**

MUS 360 Advanced Film Music

MUS 399 Junior Recital

MUS 370 Ethnic Music Seminar

MUS 381 Sound Stage Recording F**

MUS 385 Advanced Music Production F**

MUS 389 Music Industry Practices F**

MUS 401 Principles of Counterpoint F*

MUS 417 The Worship Service: Design and Function F**

MUS 420 Worship Internship

MUS 421 Senior Recital

MUS 426 Elementary Music Methods and Evaluation S**

MUS 427 Secondary Music Methods and Evaluation F*

MUS 431 Composition: Advanced Studies-- Ensembles

MUS 441 String Instruments Class F

MUS 443 Conducting II: Choral F*

MUS 444 Conducting II: Instrumental F*

MUS 451 Church Music Administration S

MUS 452 Music in Modern Worship F

MUS 460 Professional Touring F**

MUS 461 Departmental Seminar

MUS 470 Cross-Cultural Internship

MUS 499 Senior Project/Paper

MUS 999 Elective

Music Therapy

MUT 153 Introduction to Music Therapy

MUT 156 Clinical Practicum Orientation

MUT 203 Psychology of Music

MUT 256 Instrumental Skills for Music Therapy MUT 303 Music Therapy I: Developmental

MUT 306 Clinical I: Developmental

MUT 353 Music Therapy II: Geriatric

MUT 356 Clinical II: Geriatric

MUT 403 Music Therapy III: Psychiatric

MUT 406 Clinical III: Psychiatric

MUT 453 Music Therapy IV: Med/Rehab

MUT 456 Clinical IV: Med/Rehab

MUT 470 Music Therapy Research/Methods

MUT 480 Music Therapy Internship

 
Proficiencies

PRFM 100 Piano Proficiency

PRFM 101 Music Vocabulary Proficiency

PRFM 102 Guitar Proficiency

 

 

  

theatre, drama and visual arts department

laura holland, m.f.a., chair

MISSION STATEMENT: With Whole Person Education, the ORU Theatre, Dance, and Visual Arts Department guides and challenges students to raise the standard of global professional practice in the visual and performing arts by pursuing excellence in their craft, health in their body, and foundation in their faith. 

We are committed to guiding students to celebrate the freedom of Christ and to be a positive influence in society.  We seek to develop and train the Christian Artist to serve the world with God’s healing through their divine talent and creative works.

OVERVIEW

Courses in the Theatre, Drama and Visual Arts Department are designed for students desiring (1) general cultural background in the performing and visual arts; (2) a strong foundation for graduate work; (3) foundational preparation for a career in the performing and visual arts; and (4) certification for teaching.

The departments offers programs for students interested in art, dance, drama/television and film performance, teaching art, theatre and numerous other academic fields.

DEGREE PROGRAMS

The department offers seven majors and five minors.

 

Theatre Arts (B.A.)

The theatre arts major provides a foundation on which one can build experiences in professional, semi-professional, or amateur dramatic production; develops the intellectual, aesthetic, and creative potential of students through drama as a liberal study; and prepares students for graduate study in the theatre.

 

Drama/TV/Film Performance (B.S.)

The drama/television/film performance major (1) provides a foundation one can use to build experiences in professional, semi-professional, or amateur drama/ television/film performance; (2) develops the intellectual, aesthetic, and creative potential of students through drama/television/film as a liberal arts study; (3) prepares students for graduate study in drama, television and film; and (4) provides the student with a variety of acting opportunities and experiences on the live theatre stage, in the television studio, and on the film location.

 

Musical Theatre (B.A.)

The musical theatre major (1)provides a foundation on which one can build experiences in professional, semi-professional, or amateur theatre, music and dance performance; (2) develops the intellectual, aesthetic, and creative potential of students through drama, music, and dance as a liberal arts study; (3) prepares students for graduate study in drama, music and dance; and (4) provides the student with a variety of acting opportunities and experiences on the live theatre stage in opera, musical theatre and dance performances.

 

Dance Performance (B.A.)

The dance performance major prepares students physically, intellectually, and spiritually to become dance artists of excellence. Their training is in an atmosphere that promotes the blending of faith and art. The student will explore space, effort, time and design through the world of dance. Our teachers are dedicated in helping dancers discover their artistic voices and sharpen their skills so that they may have a positive impact on their culture.

 

Studio Art (B.A.)

This major validates and nurtures each student’s call to be a Christian artist or art teacher. The art faculty seek to instill a firm foundation of creative experiences in 2-D and 3-D as well as a critical knowledge of art past and present. Faculty teach the necessary technical art skills (e.g., painting, ceramics, sculpture, and printmaking) and written skills to pursue their chosen disciplines. These facets collectively assist students in the preparation of a portfolio, thus enabling the student to be in a competitive position for the marketplace or for applying to graduate school.

 

Graphic Design (B.S.)

This major begins the process of professional preparation for a career in graphic design. Students complete a broad range of study in studio art as grounding for an expansive course of study in design. Specialized courses in typography, Web, and motion design prepare students for a design studio and internship requirements. Students may choose to pursue additional study in related disciplines through discretionary and elective options. Students in this major are required to fulfill the design technology requirement, as published by the department, upon completion of ART 218 Graphic Design I.

 

TEACHING LICENSURE

The Theatre, Drama and Visual Arts Department offers two options for students wanting to teach: (1) completion of the art education major for K-12 teaching licensure or (2) completion of another major in the Theatre, Drama and Visual Arts Department, which can lead to alternative certification. As alternative certification is intended for those seeking career changes, requirements vary widely from state to state, and laws governing these programs can change frequently. Therefore, students interested in pursuing alternative certification need to meet with the ORU College of Education’s certification officer to ensure they are well informed prior to choosing this option. Students pursuing alternative certification need to check with the State Department of Education from any state in which they plan to teach in order to ensure they meet specific requirements for that state’s alternative certification.

A cooperative liaison is maintained throughout the program by the Theatre, Drama and Visual Arts Department and the ORU College of Education. For this reason, it is important that all students interested in teachng identify themselves to both this department and the College of Education as soon as possible.

 

ART EDUCATION (B.A.)

This major is for students planning to teach art in elementary and secondary grades (K-12). The major meets licensure standards for the State of Oklahoma and is offered in cooperation with the ORU College of Education. Students interested in this major should work with both the advisor in this department and with the College of Education.

 

MINORS

The Theatre, Drama and Visual Arts Department also offers the following minors: art, graphic design, theatre arts, fine arts technology, dance, and drama.

 

CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS

Campus Artists meet to discuss all fine arts activities, produce art, and participate in service-related projects. Experience levels range from beginner to advanced. Membership is open to all ORU students.

Photography Society meets to take pictures for various campus groups and events and to increase their knowledge of the profession. Experience levels range from beginner to advanced. Membership is open to all ORU students.

Art Directors Club of Tulsa is a professional organization dedicated to promote, elevate, and connect creative visual communications professional around the world. It focuses on the highest standards of excellence and integrity in visual communications for the industry and encourages students and young professionals entering the field. Student membership is strongly recommended for design majors.

AIGA, the professional association for design, stimulates thinking about design, demonstrates the value of design, and empowers the success of designers at each stage of their careers. AIGA’s mission is to advance designing as a professional craft, strategic tool, and vital cultural force. Student membership is strongly recommended for design majors.

Alpha Psi Omega is an honorary drama society.

Nu Delta Alpha Society is an honorary dance society.

 

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES AND OPPORTUNITIES

Students have opportunity to display their talents by involving themselves in on- and off-campus activities. Some of these activities include the following:

  • Art shows on and off campus
  • Art displays in the Galleria (LRC third floor)
  • Rotating art displays in the Tutoring Center (GC fifth floor)
  • Senior project shows
  • Annual juried faculty and student shows
  • Theatre performances
  • Dance performances
  • Study Abroad-Students many complete a semester remotely or abroad. Interested students should visit with their faculty advisor.
  • Students explore inductry careers with on-campus and virtual speakers, field trips and through regional and national conference attendance.

 

AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS
  • Outstanding Senior Paper—awarded to the graduating senior having the best senior paper within the department.
  • Visual Art Student of the Year—awarded to a studio art, graphic design (print or video), or art education major, as determined by the art faculty.
  • Thomas C. Durfey Outstanding Senior Award—awarded to the top graduating senior in each major program within the department..
  • Warren and Eileen Straton Memorial Scholarship—awarded to a sophomore or junior majoring in art education, graphic design, or studio art.
  • Charles Ramsay Sr. Memorial Scholarship—awarded to a sophomore or junior art major.
  • Art Talent Scholarship—a $1000 scholarship given each year to up to 20 art majors and is renewable each year for a total award of $4000. New and returning students are eligible to apply through a formal application process.

  

art EDUCATION MAJOR (artE) WITH K-12 TEACHING LICENSURE BACHELOR OF arts

The art education major is for students planning standard certification to teach art in elementary and secondary grades. The major meets licensure standards for the State of Oklahoma and is offered in cooperation with the ORU College of Education. Students interested in this major should work with both the advisor in this department and the College of Education.

Students may earn licensure in a second subject/content area. The Oklahoma Commission for Teacher Preparation requires the OSAT/OPTE test(s) be passed in order to obtain a license in an additional subject/content area. Students interested in completing coursework toward additional licensing should consult the subject area advisor.

General Education 

Introduction to Whole Person Assessment (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Social Science (SOC 323) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Physical Science (lecture and lab) - 4

Biological Science (lecture and lab) - 4

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12                                                      HUM 103, ART 103*, and ART 104* plus one of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 333, COMP 101 or MAT 315.

Health and Physical Education - 4                    (one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, Basic First Aid/CPR, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 61

*Grade of “C” or better required

Major

ART 101 Fundamentals of Art I - 3

ART 102 Fundamentals Art II - 3

ART 107 Digital Funamentals - 3

ART 201 Ceramics I - 3

ART 203 Painting I - 3

ART 204 Printmaking I - 3

ART 213 Drawing - 3

ART 214 Figure Drawing - 3

ART 223 Crafts - 3

ART 307 Art History Survey III - 3

ART 333 Watercolor - 3

Choice of three the following courses - 9

ART 202 Sculpture
ART 218 Graphic Design II
ART 304 Advanced Printmaking
ART 315 Advanced Painting
ART 318 Advanced Printmaking
ART 321 Advanced Ceramics
ART 365 Digital Photography
ART 999 Elective
_____

Major Total - 42

Note: The requirement of a senior paper/project is met by the professional education portfolio.

Professional Education

ART 106 Elem/Secondary Methods and Evaluation - 6          (1 credit for six semesters)

PED 100 Education Seminar (every semester) - 0

Choice of one of the following two field experiences: - 1

PED 111 Field-Based Experience/Practicum (Elementary)
PED 121 Field-Based Experience/Practicum (Secondary)

PED 203 Foundations and Methods of Education - 3

PED 222 School Health Care - 1

PED 305 Pedagogy I - 4

PED 306 Pedagogy II - 4

PED 361 Professional Education Seminar/ Portfolio - 0

PED 475 Intern/Student Teaching: Elementary - 5

PED 495 Intern/Student Teaching: 10-12 - 5

____

Professional Education Total - 29

____

Degree Total - 132

DANCE PERFORMANCE (DANP) BACHELOR OF ARTS

GENERAL EDUCATION 

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communications (COM 101) - 3

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) - 6

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (2 semesters including HPE 319) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12                                                        (HUM 103, DANP 125*, DRAM 215* 12 plus one of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 333 )

Social Science Elective - 3                            (Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244, MUS 208, PSY 201, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, SWK 202)

Health and Physical Education - 4.5                 (one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 61.5

*Grade of “C” or better required.

MAJOR

DANP 106 Dance Seminar - 4                        (taken 8 times at .5)

DANP 107 Improvisation I - 1

DANP 108 Improvisation II - 1

DANP 109 Dance Ensemble - 5

DANP 207 Fund of Choreography - 2

DANP 230 Dance for Worship - 2

DANP 307 Intermediate Choreography - 2

DANP 325 History of Dance II - 3

DANP 406 Pedagogy I - 2

DANP 407 Advanced Choreography - 2

DANP 420 Performance Arts Management - 3

DANP 426 Pedagogy II - 2

DANP 490 Senior Performance - 3

A total of eight semesters of ballet - 12

DANP 100 Beginning Ballet

DANP 103 Ballet I

DANP 203 Ballet II

DANP 303 Ballet III

DANP 403 Ballet IV

A total of eight semesters of modern dance - 12

DANP 101 Beginning Modern Dance

DANP 104 Modern Dance I

DANP 204 Modern Dance II

DANP 304 Modern Dance III

DANP 404 Modern Dance IV

A total of six semesters of dance forms - 6

DANP 102 Beginning Dance Forms

DANP 105 Dance Forms I

DANP 205 Dance Forms II

DANP 305 Dance Forms III

____

Major Total - 62

Elective Credits Total - 4.5

____

Degree Total - 128

  

DRAMA/TELEVISION/FILM PERFORMANCE MAJOR (DTF) BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

All drama/television/film performance majors must register for DRAM 105 Theatre Seminar for six semesters. The Drama/Television/Film/Performance program does not require a minor but does include a cognate of 21 additional hours of drama, mass media communication, and film courses.

GENERAL EDUCATION

Introduction to Whole Person Education  (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (2 semesters including HPE 319) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12                                                   (HUM 103, DRAM 215*, DRAM 304*, plus one of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 333 )

Social Science Elective - 3                            (Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244, MUS 208, PSY 201, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, SWK 202)

Health and Physical Education - 5                 (one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 56

*Grade of “C” or better required.

MAJOR

DRAM 105 Theatre Seminar - 3                           (6 semesters at .5 per semester)

DRAM 107 Film Acting Techniques - 3

DRAM 205 Fundamentals of Acting - 3

DRAM 216 Intro to Technical Production - 3

DRAM 305 Theatre History II - 3

DRAM 306 Advanced Acting - 3

DRAM 336 Directing - 3

DRAM 403 Costume Design - 3

DRAM 405 Makeup Design - 3

DRAM 420 Performing Arts Management - 3

DRAM 498 Senior Paper Preparation - 1

DRAM 499 Research and Senior Paper/ Project - 2

JRN 215 Workshop: News/Anchoring - 1

Choice of one of the following two acting courses - 3

DRAM 232 Acting Styles

DRAM 301 Acting for Musical Theatre

Choice of one of the following two design courses - 3

DRAM 404 Theatrical Scene Design

DRAM 233 Theatrical Lighting Design and Technology

____

Major Total - 40

COGNATE

DRAM 227 Theatre Forms - 3

TVF 128 Principles of Audio Production - 3

TVF 318 Fundamentals of Scriptwriting - 3

TVF 332 Field Production and Editing - 3

TVF 337 Film Directing and Producing - 3

TVF 345 Announcing - 3

TVF 417 Media Analysis - 3

____

Cognate Total - 21

Elective Credits Total - 12

____

Degree Total - 129

  

GRAPHIC DESIGN MAJOR (GRD) BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

General Education 

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105 or MAT 201) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12                                                      HUM 103, ART 103*, and ART 104* plus one of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 333, COMP 101 or MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3 (Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244, MUS 208, PSY 201, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, SWK 202)

Health and Physical Education - 5                    (one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 56

*Grade of “C” or better required.

Core Courses

ART 101 Fundamentals of Art I - 3

ART 102 Fundamentals of Art II - 3

ART 107 Digital Fundamentals - 3

ART 213 Drawing - 3

ART 214 Figure Drawing - 3

ART 307 Art History Survey III - 3

ART 331 Illustration - 3

ART 499 Senior Project - 3

_____

Core Total - 24

Major

ART 205 Typography - 3

ART 218 Graphic Design I - 3

ART 318 Graphic Design II - 3

ART 355 Graphic Design Studio* - 6

ART 365 Digital Photography - 3

ART 378 Motion Design** - 6

ART 442 Web Design** - 6

ART 453 Practicum Infield Study - 3

Choice of six hours from the following - 6

ART 201 Ceramics I

ART 202 Sculpture I 

ART 203 Painting I 

ART 204 Printmaking I 

ART 435 Advanced Photography 

ART 999 Art electives 

­­­_____

Major Total - 39

Elective Credits Total - 9

____

Degree Total - 128

*ART 355 is 1.5 credit hours and is taken four times.

**ART 378 and ART 442 are 3 credit hours. These courses are taken twice.

  

MUSICAL THEATRE (MUST) BACHELOR OF ARTS

The musical theatre major incorporates dance, acting, theatre, and music. It also requires a dance minor.

General Education

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communications (COM 101) - 3

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) - 6

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (2 semesters including HPE 319) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12                                                                                                          (HUM 103, MUS 300*, DRAM 305*, and DRAM 215*)

Social Science Elective - 3                                                                                                  (Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244, MUS 208, PSY 201, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, SWK 202)

Health and Physical Education - 4.5                                                                                (one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

___

General Education Total - 61.5

*Grade of “C” or better required.

Major

MUS 004 Applied Music: Voice - 8

(8 semesters at 1 hr. per semester)

MUS 001-025 Applied Music Piano - 1

MUS 073 Opera Theatre - 4

(4 semesters at 1 hr. per semester)

MUS 099 Music Seminar - 2

(4 semesters at .5 per semester)

MUS 101 Harmony I - 2

MUS 102 Harmony II - 2

MUS 103 Sight Singing I - 2

MUS 104 Sight Singing II - 2

MUS 241 Phonetics for Singers - 1

MUS 352 Musical Theatre History - 2

DRAM 105 Theatre Seminar - 3

(6 semesters at .5 per semester)

DRAM 205 Fundamentals of Acting - 3

DRAM 216 Introduction to Technical Production - 3

DRAM 301 Acting for Musical Theatre - 3

DRAM 306 Advanced Acting - 3

DRAM 336 Directing - 3

DRAM 405 Makeup Design - 3

DRAM 498 Senior Paper Preparation - 1

DRAM 499 Research and Senior Paper/Project - 2

____

Major Total - 50

Required Dance Minor - 18

Degree Total - 129.5

  

STUDIO ART MAJOR (STA) CERAMICS, PAINTING, SCULPTURE, PRINTMAKING BACHELOR OF ARTS

General Education 

Intro to Whole Person Educ (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) - 6

Oral Communication (COM 101) - 3

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (lecture and lab) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105 or MAT 201) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12                                                      HUM 103, ART 103*, and ART 104* plus one of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 333, COMP 101 or MAT 315.

Social Science Elective - 3                                        (Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244, MUS 208, PSY 201, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, SWK 202)

Health and Physical Education - 7                  (one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 64

*Grade of “C” or better required.

Core Courses

ART 101 Fundamentals of Art I - 3

ART 102 Fundamentals of Art II - 3

ART 107 Digital Fundamaentals - 3

ART 213 Drawing - 3

ART 214 Figure Drawing - 3

ART 307 Art History Survey III - 3

ART 331 Illustration - 3

ART 499 Senior Project - 3

____

Core Total - 24

Major

ART 201 Ceramics I - 3

ART 202 Sculpture I - 3

ART 203 Painting I - 3

ART 204 Printmaking I - 3

ART 365 Digital Photography - 3

Choice of five of the following courses -15

ART 304 Advanced Printmaking -3-6 hrs.

ART 313 Advanced Drawing -  3-6 hrs.

ART 315 Advanced Painting - 3-6 hrs.

ART 321 Advanced Ceramics - 3-6 hrs.

ART 341 Advanced Sculpture - 3-6 hrs.

ART Art electives - 3-6 hrs.

____

Major Total - 30

____

Elective Credits Total -12

____

Degree Total - 130

  

THEATRE ARTS MAJOR (THA) BACHELOR OF ARTS

All theatre arts majors must register for DRAM 105 Theatre Seminar for eight semesters.

General Education 

Introduction to Whole Person Education (GEN 150) - 1

English (COMP 102, 303) - 6

Oral Communications (COM 101) - 3

Foreign Language (2 semesters including 203) - 6

Biblical Literature (BLIT 110, 120) - 6

Theology (THE 103) - 3

Laboratory Science (2 semesters including HPE 319) - 8

Mathematics (MAT 105) - 3

American History (HIS 101) - 3

American Government (GOV 101) - 3

Humanities - 12                                                                                                          (HUM 103 and DRAM 215*, DRAM 304* or 305*, plus one of the following: HUM 222, 233, 244, 333)

Social Science Elective - 3                                                                                    (Choice of one of the following: BUS 201, FIN 244, MUS 208, PSY 201, SOC 101, SOC 201, SOC 323, SWK 202)

Health and Physical Education - 4.5                                                                                (one course per full-time semester at ORU, including HPE 00I and 002, swimming course or proficiency, and activity courses)

____

General Education Total - 61.5

*Grade of “C” or better required.

Major

DRAM 105 Theatre Seminar (taken 8 times at .5 credit hrs.) - 4

DRAM 204 Playwriting - 3

DRAM 205 Fundamentals of Acting - 3

DRAM 216 Introduction to Technical Production - 3

DRAM 227 Theatre Forms - 3

DRAM 306 Advanced Acting - 3

DRAM 336 Directing - 3

DRAM 403 Costume Design - 3

DRAM 405 Makeup Design - 3

DRAM 420 Performing Arts Management - 3

DRAM 498 Senior Paper Preparation - 1

DRAM 499 Research and Senior Paper/Project - 2

Choice of one of the following two courses - 3

DRAM 232 Acting Styles

DRAM 301 Acting for Musical Theatre

Choice of one of the following two design courses - 3

DRAM 233 Theatrical Lighting Design and Technology

DRAM 404 Theatrical Scene Design

____

Major Total - 40

Minor - 18

Elective Credits Total - 9

____

Degree Total - 128.5

  

Art Minor (ARTM)

Choice of one of the following two courses - 3

ART 101 Fundamentals of Art I

ART 102 Fundamentals of Art II

Choice of one of the following three courses - 3

ART 103 Art History Survey I

ART 104 Art History Survey II

ART 307 Art History Survey III

Choice of twelve hours from the following courses - 12

ART 106 Elementary and Secondary Methods/Evaluation

ART 201 Ceramics I

ART 202 Sculpture I

ART 203 Painting I 

ART 204 Printmaking I 

ART 205 Typography 

ART 213 Drawing 

ART 214 Figure Drawing 

ART 218 Graphic Design I 

ART 223 Crafts 

ART 304 Advanced Printmaking

_____

Minor Total - 18

Dance Minor (DANM)

Choice of four hours from the following** - 4

DANP 100 Beginning Ballet* 

DANP 103 Ballet I*

DANP 203 Ballet II* 

DANP 303 Ballet III* 

DANP 403 Ballet IV*

Choice of four hours from the following** -  4

DANP 101 Beginning Modern Dance* (1 hr.)

DANP 104 Modern Dance I* (1 hr.)

DANP 204 Modern Dance II* (1 hr.)

DANP 304 Modern Dance III* (1 hr.)

DANP 404 Modern Dance IV* (1 hr.)

Choice of four hours from the following - 4

DANP 102 Beginning Dance Forms* (1 hr.)

DANP 105 Dance Forms I* (1 hr.)

DANP 205 Dance Forms II* (1 hr.)

DANP 305 Dance Forms III* (1 hr.)

DANP Dance Electives*** 6

_____

Minor Total - 18

*Course can be taken more than once for credit.

**Placement needs approval by the dance program director.

Drama Minor (DRAM)

DRAM 205 Fundamentals of Acting - 3

DRAM 215 Introduction to Theatre - 3

DRAM 216 Introduction to Technical Production - 3

DRAM 336 Directing - 3

DRAM Drama electives* - 6

____

Minor Total - 18

*With approval of the drama advisor.

Graphic Design Minor (GRDM)

This minor provides a basic overview to terminology, strategy, and techniques of graphic design practice.

ART 101 Fundamentals of Art I - 3

ART 218 Graphic Design I - 3

ART 318 Graphic Design II - 3

ART 355 Graphic Design Studio* - 1.5

ART 355 Graphic Design Studio* - 1.5

Choice of one of the following - 3

ART 102 Fundamentals of Art II

ART 213 Drawing

Choice of one of the following - 3

ART 103 Art History Survey I

ART 104 Art History Survey II

ART 307 Art History Survey III

_____

Minor Total - 18

 *This course is to be taken for two semesters.

FINE ARTS TECHNOLOGY MINOR (FATM)

Students choose a total of 18 hours, nine from each of two areas. At least one course from each area must be 300 or 400 level.

COMMUNICATION ARTS

Choice of three of the following courses - 9

INT 401 Advanced Interactive Media

TVF 228 Introduction to TV Production

TVF 128 Principles of Audio Production

TVF 317 Media Analysis

TVF 318 Fundamentals of Scriptwriting

_____

Communication Arts Area Total - 9

 

 

MUSIC

MUS 300 Music Appreciation

Choice of two of the following courses - 2

MUS 061/089 Performance Groups (1 hr.)

MUS 001/025 Applied Music (1 hr.)

MUS 131 Class Voice (1 hr.)

MUS 135 Class Guitar (1 hr.)

Choice of four hours from the following - 4

MUS 105 Introduction to Music Technology (1 hr.)

MUS 313 Sequencing and Digital Audio (3 hrs.)

MUS 315 Music Rich Media (3 hrs.)

CHIL 400 Introduction to Sound Reinforcement (2 hrs.)

CHIL 401 Studio Recording & Music Production I (3 hrs.)

CHIL 402 Studio Recording  & Music Production II (3hrs.)

CHIL 403 Recording Studio Maintenance (1 hr.)

CHIL 404 Advanced Studio Recording (1 hr.)

CHIL 405 New Technology Audio Production (1 hr.)

___

Music Total - 9

___

Minor Total - 18

  

DEPARTMENTAL COURSES

Descriptions of the courses listed below are in the section titled Course Descriptions at the end of this catalog. Course descriptions are listed in alphabetical order by the prefix.

Art

ART 101 Fundamentals of Art I

ART 102 Fundamentals of Art II

ART 103 Art History Survey I

ART 104 Art History Survey II

ART 106 Elementary and Secondary Methods/Evaluation

ART 107 Digital Fundamentals

ART 201 Ceramics I

ART 202 Sculpture I

ART 203 Painting I

ART 204 Printmaking I

ART 205 Typography

ART 213 Drawing

ART 214 Figure Drawing

ART 218 Graphic Design I

ART 223 Crafts

ART 307 Art History Survey III

ART 304 Advanced Printmaking

ART 313 Advanced Drawing

ART 315 Advanced Painting

ART 322 Advanced Ceramics

ART 341 Advanced Sculpture

ART 318 Graphic Design II

ART 331 Illustration

ART 333 Watercolor

ART 353 Practicum Infield Study I

ART 355 Graphic Design Studio

ART 363 Black and White Photography

ART 365 Digital Photography

ART 378 Motion Design

ART 435 Advanced Photography

ART 442 Web Design

ART 452 Directed Study

ART 453 Practicum Infield Study

ART 456 Secondary Art Methods and Evaluation

ART 462 Elementary Art Methods and Evaluation

ART 499 Senior Project

ART 999 Elective

Dance Performance

DANP 100 Beginning Ballet

DANP 101 Beginning Modern Dance

DANP 102 Beginning Dance Forms

DANP 103 Ballet I

DANP 104 Modern Dance I

DANP 105 Dance Forms I

DANP 106 Dance Seminar

DANP 107 Improvisation I

DANP 108 Improvisation II

DANP 109 Dance Ensemble

DANP 125 History of Dance I

DANP 203 Ballet II

DANP 204 Modern Dance II

DANP 205 Dance Forms II

DANP 207 Fundamentals of Choreography

DANP 230 Dance for Worship

DANP 303 Ballet III

DANP 304 Modern Dance III

DANP 305 Dance Forms III

DANP 307 Intermediate Choreography

DANP 325 History of Dance II

DANP 403 Ballet IV

DANP 404 Modern Dance IV

DANP 406 Pedagogy I: Dance Techniques for Children

DANP 407 Advanced Choreography

DANP 420 Performing Arts Management

DANP 426 Pedagogy II: Dance Techniques for Secondary Education

DANP 490 Senior Performance

DANP 999 Elective

Drama

DRAM 105 Theatre Seminar

DRAM 107 Film Acting Technique

DRAM 150 Drama in the Church

DRAM 204 Playwriting

DRAM 205 Fundamentals of Acting

DRAM 215 Introduction to Theatre

DRAM 216 Introduction to Technical Production

DRAM 227 Theatre Forms

DRAM 232 Acting Styles

DRAM 233 Theatrical Lighting Design and Technology

DRAM 301 Acting for Musical Theatre

DRAM 304 Theatre History I

DRAM 305 Theatre History II

DRAM 306 Advanced Acting

DRAM 336 Directing

DRAM 350 Radio Drama

DRAM 403 Costume Design

DRAM 404 Theatrical Scene Design

DRAM 405 Makeup Design

DRAM 498 Senior Paper Preparation

DRAM 499 Research and Senior Paper/Project

DRAM 999 Elective