Academic Information and Policies

Academic Records

The Registrar’s Office maintains a file on each enrolled student. Student files contain correspondence and communication that take place between the student, the university, and the public. Information within the file is maintained according to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974, as amended. This act was designed to protect the privacy of education records, to establish records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. Students have the right to file complaints with FERPA concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with this act.

Students may access their grade reports via the Web at the end of each semester. It is the student’s responsibility to seek correction for any apparent errors and to keep the Registrar’s Office informed of any mailing address changes. Failure on the student’s part to seek correction within one year after the conclusion of the semester the course was taken indicates that records are accurate as stated.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records beginning the first day of class.

These rights are as follows:

• The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day the university receives a request for access. Students should submit to the registrar written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The university official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the university official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed

• The right to request the amendment of education records that the student believes is inaccurate or misleading. A student may ask the university to amend a record that he or she believes is inaccurate or misleading. The student should write the university official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record to be changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the university decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the university will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

• The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is defined as a person employed by the university in an administrative, supervisory, academic, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit and health staff); a person or company with whom the university has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, degree, or enrollment verification service such as the National Student Loan Clearinghouse, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.

ORU designates the following categories of student information as public or “Directory Information.”

Such information may be disclosed by the institution for any purpose, at its discretion.

Category I: Name, address, telephone number, dates of attendance, classification.

Category II: Previous institution(s) attended, major field of study, awards, honors, degree(s) conferred (including dates).

Category III: Past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities, physical factors (height, weight) of athletes, date and place of birth.

Category IV: Grade reports to parents or guardians of undergraduate students who are of dependent status.

Currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of any category of information under FERPA. To withhold disclosure, written notification must be received in the Registrar’s Office.

• The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the university to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The following is name and address of the office that administers FERPA:

Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-4605

Undergraduate students declare dependent or independent status as part of the registration process. All undergraduate students are considered independent as it pertains to the confidentiality of their academic record and FERPA.. Parents may obtain non-directory information (grades, GPA, etc.) only after the student has changed their FERPA status to dependent and identified the individual as being authorized to which information can be disclosed. Parents also may obtain non-directory information by obtaining a signed consent from their child.

More information, including a tutorial, is available on the ORU website.

Enrollment

Classification of Students

A student’s classification is determined as follows:

• Freshman—fewer than 27 semester hours

• Sophomore—27 to 59 semester hours

• Junior—60 to 89 semester hours

• Senior—90 semester hours or more

The standard number of semester hours needed to receive an undergraduate degree is 128; however, some degrees require more hours, as specified in the department sections of this catalog.

Classification of Courses

Courses are identified with letters and numbers. The letters refer to the subject area, and the first digit of the course number indicates the level.

100s First year

200s Second year

300s Third year

400s Fourth year

500 and above Graduate or professional

For each term, five-digit Course Reference Numbers (CRNs) are assigned to each course section to facilitate registration.

Catalog Requirements and Readmissions

A candidate completing a degree program at ORU within the regular time period outlined for the degree or in a period of continuous full-time enrollment may earn the degree under the catalog of the year of matriculation or choose to meet the full requirements in the catalog of any one of the intervening subsequent years. This must be done in writing and submitted to the Registrar’s Office.

A full-time student who is readmitted and whose re-enrollment is continuous to graduation may meet the full requirements of the catalog of the year in which the student re-enrolls or the full requirements of the catalog of any one of the intervening subsequent years. Any student not maintaining continuous enrollment must meet the requirements of the catalog of the most recent year of entry.

Seven years is the time limit a student has to meet the degree requirements under a particular catalog. After seven years, the student is required to satisfy the requirements of the newest catalog. Prior credits earned do not expire, however.

Registration

Students, with the approval of their academic advisors, plan their programs in accordance with the degree plans for their declared majors or graduate programs as outlined in this catalog or any curriculum changes approved since publication. Student enrollment must be completed according to the academic calendar.

No contract arises from enrollment; the university reserves the right to alter its rules and regulations at any time. The university reserves the right to cancel any course for which enrollment is considered insufficient.

Non-Traditional Coursework

Courses by Special Arrangement

With the permission of the student’s advisor, the department concerned, and the instructor of a particular subject listed in the course schedule, a student may complete a course by special arrangement/ directed study. Directed study courses are charged at the same rate as other residential courses. The objectives of the course, as defined in the current syllabus, must be met. Special assignments, tests, and conferences may be required to satisfy the instructor and department concerned that the objectives have been achieved. A course of study that involves extensive work while the student is absent from the campus can be pursued only upon the approval of a petition presented to the dean of the respective college.

Online Courses

Online courses offered in the fall and spring through the ORU Distance Learning Department are seven weeks in duration. Those offered through one of the university’s residential academic departments last the entire semester. A residential student wanting to take an ORU distance learning course during the fall or spring must file a Petition for Policy Exception with the director of distance learning. It must also be approved by the student’s academic advisor, department chair and financial aid by the last day to add classes. Online course enrollment during the fall or spring semesters contributes to the fulfillment of the 12-hour minimum for full-time status; however, it may affect full-time financial aid.

Off-Campus and Study Abroad Programs

Students may design personalized study abroad programs, working closely with academic advisors to develop a proposed program at least one year in advance of studying abroad. Prior to going abroad, the proposals must be approved by ORU’s International Study Committee.

ORU awards credit for the following off-campus programs (semester and summer) offered by the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU).

CCCU Semester Programs

The Australia Studies Centre (ASC) seeks to prepare students to live the Christian life in a religiously and culturally pluralistic world. Students examine the many faces of Australia and are challenged to grapple with the meaning of being salt and light in the culture-shaping arena of the professional performing artist.

The American Studies Program (ASP) is designed to help students integrate faith with the realities of the marketplace and public life. Through a semester of experiential learning in Washington, DC, ASP students explore their career interests while examining specific public policy issues.

The China Studies Program enables students to view China from the inside and to experience its culture and its diversities. Although students reside primarily on the campuses of China’s premier universities in Xi’an and Shanghai they also experience Beijing, Hong Kong, and other areas. Students study the Chinese language, geography, history, religion, and culture. A service opportunity allows students to assist in English classes.

The Contemporary Music Center, on the island of Martha's Vineyard, offers students the opportunity to study and work with faculty and music industry experts who share an interest in making and marketing contemporary music. The program is for any student considering a career as a musician, vocalist, songwriter, producer, engineer, artist manager, booking agent, A&R director, marketing executive, music publisher, concert promoter or entertainment industry entrepreneur. An intensive field experience in Nashville is included.

The India Studies Program provides both immersion in a local community and broad exposure to a variety of peoples, places, and customs in India. Students particiipate in two core courses that give a broad overview of the historical, religious, geographical, and economic landscape of India through the eyes of Indian Christians, and students can take courses in their major areas with Indian students and professors.

The Latin American Studies Program is based in San Jose, Costa Rica. It allows students to experience cross-cultural living, to deepen their understandings of the Lordship of Christ in an international context, to explore the economic, political, social, and cultural realities of Latin America, and to examine North America’s relationship with its Latin neighbors.

The Los Angeles Film Studies Center exists to introduce students to the work and workings of Hollywood and to prepare them to serve with professional skill and Christian integrity in the film industry.

The Middle East Studies Program, based in Israel, helps students understand the history, religions, peoples, and cultures of this fascinating and complex region. As part of the Conflict and Change course, students hear guest speakers and travel to select locations in Israel. Conditions permitting, they will also go to Cairo, Egypt.

The Scholars’ Semester in Oxford presents a rigorous academic program aimed at increasing critical thinking skills and scholarship. Students choose from a wide variety of tutorial study programs in the arts, religion, history, economics, philosophy, and many others. A small group seminar and an integrative course are designed to guide students on faith and learning issues. Field trips accentuate England’s rich historical setting.

The Uganda Studies Program offers students a personal encounter with this country, which has become an economic and public health model in its region. Program courses taught by local faculty in the English tutorial tradition immerse students in a uniquely African experience. Topics such as African literature, African history, and Christianity and Islam in contemporary Africa provide insights into African life because of the guidance of local faculty.

The Washington Journalism Center provides a semester of experience on Capitol Hill. Students use professional news skills and learn about being a Christian working in the news media of the nation’s capital.

CCCU Summer Programs

The Oxford Summer Programme is designed to enable students to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between Christianity and culture and to participate in specialized study under Oxford academicians. This is a five-week study program built around lectures focusing on Christianity and the development of Western culture. In addition to lectures, students enroll in a Field Seminar and a Topical Seminar. The program is appropriate for rising sophomores, juniors, and seniors; graduate and seminary students; non-traditional students; and those enrolled in continuing education programs.

Other Programs

ORU also participates with the following programs:

Au Sable Institute of Environmental Studies. Information is available in the Biology and Chemistry Department section of this catalog. (This is on the CCCU registry.)

The Focus on the Family Institute, located in Colorado Springs, offers a multidisciplinary curriculum for students from ORU and other participating colleges from the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities. The Institute focuses on topics related not only to psychology, sociology and family studies, but also to leadership, social ethics, public policy, philosophy and theology. (This is on the CCCU registry.)

The Recording Workshop. Information is available in the Music Department section of this catalog.

The H.E.A.R.T. Institute (Hunger Education and Resources Training) is an interdenominational center that trains students to serve in Third World locations. Located in Florida, the center simulates village life to provide students with practical, hands-on experience. The curriculum includes technical, problem solving, and coping skills in an effort to prepare students for challenging endeavors overseas.

Credit by Examination or Demonstration

With the permission of the department chair or dean concerned, students currently enrolled in the university may petition to demonstrate (either by examination or other means) mastery of the usual course material covered to earn credit in any subject listed in the catalog. Students may not petition for credit in this manner for courses in which they have been enrolled during previous semesters. After successfully petitioning, students must enroll in Section 85 (the test-out section) of the desired classes before the last day to add classes. The student and department faculty involved then schedule the demonstration.

Students who attempt to receive credit for courses by examination or demonstration will have the grades posted on their transcripts. Grades of “A,” “B,” or “C” are posted as earned. The words "test-out" appear as part of the course title on the ORU transcript. Grades of “D” or “F” are posted as “NP” (no pass). Students who do not take the exam or complete the required demonstrations and neglect to drop the courses by the end of the drop period for the semester receive grades of “F,” which are posted as “NP” (no pass).

Graduate students and part-time undergraduate students are charged one-half tuition for recording the credit. Full-time undergraduate students are charged one-half tuition for any hours over 18.5.

. If a student takes the exam before the add/drop deadline and receives a grade of “NP,” the student may petition to enroll in a non-test-out section of the class. The petition must be approved by the professor of record, college dean, Director of Student Accounts, and registrar. The student must pay the difference between the original tuition charge for a test-out class and the full tuition charge for a non-test-out section of the class.

Continuation as a Student

Continuation as a student at Oral Roberts University is not automatic. Basic academic, spiritual, and physical requirements must be satisfied. Additionally, all prior balances must be paid in full.

Students admitted on probation must earn sufficient credit within the first academic year to be removed from probation. Failure to be removed from probation may result in suspension. Students consult with their program advisors prior to each enrollment period. Progress for students is monitored by the advisors and the students, based on the appropriate degree plan sheet.

Retention for graduate students is contingent upon the following:

•Students must maintain the standards, grades, and grade point averages appropriate to the degree programs in all work done for credit (including HPE courses) toward meeting the degree requirements.

•Students must meet the requirements of a physical activity by enrolling in and passing HPE courses as specified in their degree plans.

• Students must attend chapel according to the guidelines established by Student Development.

Students must maintain the lifestyle as defined in the student handbook.

The university may request the withdrawal of students at any time if they fail to comply with the standards and regulations of the institution or are not compatible with its philosophy. It is imperative for students to understand that attending and receiving a degree from ORU is a privilege, not a right.

Course Loads

Definition of a Credit Hour

ORU meets or exceeds the following requirements in the federal definition of credit hour:

Federal Credit Hour Definition: A credit hour is an amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally-established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than (1) one hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work each week for approximately 15 weeks for one semester or trimester hour of credit, or 10 to 12 weeks for one quarter hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or (2) at least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other activities as established by an institution, including laboratory work, internships, practica, studio work, and other academic work leading toward to the award of credit hours.

Fall and Spring Terms

Undergraduate

Full-time student status for the fall or spring semesters is defined as being enrolled in a minimum of 12 credit hours; thus, a student must be enrolled in at least 12 credit hours to be considered full-time and to be eligible for benefits of full-time status, such as most forms of financial aid.

The typical course load consists of 16 hours each semester; however, in some disciplines the load may be heavier. Recorded course withdrawal does not change full-time status unless the student withdraws from all courses, which indicates withdrawal from the university. Residential students wanting to enroll in online courses during the fall and spring semesters must submit a petition to the director of distance learning. Online courses contribute toward the fulfillment of the 12-hour requirement; however, it may affect full-time financial aid.

Undergraduate students wanting to take more than 18.5 hours in a given semester must get written permission of the major department chair. Students may not take more than 24 hours in a given semester.

Graduate

The full-time load for master’s-level students in the Graduate School of Business, the Graduate School of Education, and the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry is nine hours with the exception of the LMBA program where six hours is considered full-time.

. The full-time load for doctoral students in the Graduate School of Education is six hours per semester while enrolled in the coursework phase of the program. Two hours per semester constitutes a full-time load when enrolled in dissertation.

The full-time load for doctoral students in the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry is six hours per semester while enrolled in the coursework phase of the program. One hour per semester is considered full-time when enrolled in the project phase.

Students in the dissertation/project phase are required to enroll in a minimum of one credit for the fall, spring, and summer semesters (continuous enrollment) until their dissertation is successfully defended or the student is withdrawn from the program The student must complete a minimum of eight dissertation credit hours.

Summer Sessions

Full-time student status during a summer session is defined as being enrolled in a minimum of three credit hours. A student may enroll in a maximum of five credit hours in a summer session. Students may enroll in a maximum of six hours of online courses during a seven-week session.

A student may also enroll in online courses during the summer. A maximum of 16 combined hours (residential and online) is permitted during the summer.

Full-Time Status for Students with Disabilities

Students who have a self-identified disability and unable to enroll in the required number of semester hours to meet the ORU definition of full-time status may request an accommodation allowing them to enroll in part-time hours while remaining on a full-time status. Requesting this accommodation could affect the student’s financial aid. Students need to check with their financial aid counselors for more information. If this accommodation is approved, tuition is calculated on a per credit hour basis. The required procedure for requesting an accommodation follows:

1. Prior to the beginning of the semester, the student submits appropriate documentation of the disability to the Director of the Office of Student Resources, along with a request for a reduced course load.

2. The student must provide the Director of the Office of Student Resources with transcripts from ORU and/or previous institutions.

3. The Director of the Office of Student Resources forms a review committee, including the director and the student’s academic dean or representative.

4. The review committee makes a decision on the student's request. If the accommodation is approved, the committee determines the duration of the program. In addition, all requirements applicable to full-time students as stated in the ORU student handbook apply, including, but not limited to, the residential policy, chapel attendance, and the HPE requirement.

5. At the end of the approved duration, the student may re-apply. The review committee reassesses the student’s academic progress to determine if the accommodation will be renewed.

If the accommodation is not approved or renewed as requested, the student may appeal the review committee's decision by contacting the Director of Student Resources, as stipulated in the Reasonable Accommodation Policy of Oral Roberts University,

Adding and Dropping

Students may drop or add courses, with the approval of their faculty advisors and the departments in which the courses are offered, within the first two weeks of classes, provided the total load does not exceed 18.5 hours. A signature from the major department chair is required to enroll in more than 18.5 hours. When a course is dropped after two weeks, a “W” is recorded for students passing at the time of the drop. For students not passing, “WF” is recorded. Students withdrawing from a class after the twelfth week receive a “WF.” The “WF” is counted as an “F” in determining the grade point average. Students called up for military duty can request a “WM.”

Class and Laboratory Attendance

Attendance Policy

It is assumed that students will make the most of the educational opportunities available to them by regularly and punctually attending class and laboratory periods. Therefore, regular class attendance is required as a condition of receiving credit for work done in the class.

A student absent from a class or laboratory period is subject to a loss of “privilege status,” and the instructor may reduce the student’s grade or deny credit for that course unless the student satisfactorily accounts for the absence.

Students who wish to appeal the instructor’s decision may do so using this procedure: meet with the department chair for resolution of the excuse, then with the dean of that particular college, and ultimately with the Provost.

The attendance policy for each course is stated in the syllabus for that course. Therefore, all matters of attendance and the privilege of making up assignments or tests, except for administratively excused absences, are between the student and the professor.

Late Exam Fee

Students taking a late exam because of an unauthorized absence are charged a late exam fee. Final exams cannot be given before their scheduled times. Students need to check the final exam schedule online before planning return flights or other events at the end of the semester.

Administrative Excuses

Students absent from a class or laboratory period at the request of the university administration are given an administratively excused absence by the respective department chair or director This excuse grants the students the privilege of making up assignments, tests, or other work missed because of the absences without unreasonable limitations or penalties. The only absences that are administratively excused are for official university business. All other absences are between the student and professor.

The Student Development Office does not give administrative excuses for individual absences, such as funeral leave or student illness. For funeral leave, the Student Development Office follows the policy that absences should be worked out between students and professors. Missing classes because of a funeral for someone other than immediate family members may be deemed as an unexcused absence by some professors. Student Health Services does not give administrative excuses for absences as a result of illness. This also is a matter between students and professors.

Grading System

Grade points are assigned to each grade: four grade points are awarded for each semester hour of “A,” three for “B,” two for “C,” one for “D,” and zero for “F.” Other grades that may appear on the transcript include “W” (withdrawal), “WF” (withdraw/failure), “WM” (withdraw/military), “I” (incomplete), “E” (extension of incomplete), “P” (pass), “NP” (no pass), “AU” (audit), and “M” (missing grade). None of these other grades is used in the computation of the grade point average except the ‘WF.” A minimum GPA of 2.0 per semester hour must be earned for all undergraduate work and 3.0 for graduate work, except for M.Div. and professional master of arts degrees in the Graduate School of Theology and Ministry.

No grade below “C” may apply toward the major or professional education courses. Normally a grade of “C” is required for courses in concentrations. Generally, a course in which a “D” is earned may apply toward general education, minor, cognate, and general elective degree requirements. Some departments may have more rigorous requirements.

Incompletes

On rare occasions, the grade of “I” may be given for work that is incomplete at the time grades are given. It is given only after the instructor and the department chair or college dean approve a petition submitted by the student that his or her work is incomplete for good cause. Good cause typically consists of a catastrophic event in which the student is prevented from completing the course requirements. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate the petition, make up any incomplete work and ask the instructor to submit a grade change to the registrar. If the work is not completed by the end of the subsequent semester, the incomplete will automatically convert to an “F.” For graduating seniors, the degree will be awarded in the term that the student completes his or her course work, not the final term of enrollment.

Extension of Incompletes

On rare occasions, the grade of “E” may be given for work that remains incomplete longer than the one semester allowed to make up incomplete work. It is given only after the student establishes with the instructor and the department chair or college dean, by written permission, that his or her work remains incomplete for good cause. Good cause typically consists of a catastrophic event in which the student is prevented from completing the course requirements. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate this process, make up any incomplete work and ask the instructor to submit a grade change to the registrar. If the work is not completed by the end of the second semester following enrollment in the course, the extended incomplete will automatically convert to an “F.” For graduating seniors, the degree will be awarded in the term that the student completes his or her course work, not the final term of enrollment.

Course Withdrawal

If a student drops a course after two weeks, a “W” is recorded provided the student is passing at the time of the withdrawal. If the reason for withdrawal is being called for military duty, then the student can request a “WM.” If the student is not passing, “WF” is recorded. Any student who withdraws from a class after the twelfth week receives a “WF,” which is counted as an “F” in determining the GPA. A recorded course withdrawal form must be used to request a “W” or “WF.” Undergraduate students enrolled full-time are not permitted to withdraw from their health fitness courses.

Course Repeat

A course may be repeated at ORU to replace the original grade. The course appears on the transcript with all grades given and a repeat flag, but only the most recent grade of a repeated course counts in the GPA. The student must notify the Registrar’s Office of any repeated courses by completing a Report of Repeated Course form. Courses may be repeated outside ORU with departmental approval; however, grade point averages earned at ORU remain on the transcript and are not affected by grades earned elsewhere. Double credit is not awarded for repeated classes. Some seminars, internships, music lessons, dance classes, ensembles, and HPE activity courses may be taken more than once for credit.

Pass/No-Pass Option

Junior students in good standing may choose the pass/no-pass option for any general elective courses above 12 hours each semester. Seniors in good standing may choose the pass/no-pass option for any general elective courses above one-half of their enrollments. This option must be declared during registration or by the last day to add classes for the semester. (More information is available in the Grading System section.)

Students choosing the pass/no-pass option receive a standard grade from the instructor, but this grade is converted to a “P” or “NP” grade on the grade report and transcript. Grades of “A,” “B,” or “C” are converted to a pass grade; grades of “D” or “F” are converted to the no-pass grade. Credits taken under the pass/no-pass option are not counted in the GPA. The pass/no-pass option may not be chosen to fulfill general education requirements or requirements for a major, minor, concentration, or cognate.

Audit

Undergraduate students (with the approval of the instructor) and graduate students (with the approval of the instructor, academic advisor, and dean) may enroll as audit without credit in any undergraduate or graduate course, respectively, offered by ORU by the last day to add courses for the semester. Students may request the option of receiving grades by notifying the registrar and obtaining credit for the course. Courses audited without credit will not count toward completion of a degree or load credit. Students are responsible for any tuition incurred as a result of requesting that courses be changed from audit to credit or vice versa. Some restrictions apply to the College of Theology and Ministry.

Normally, regular class attendance as outlined in the syllabus is required to receive an audit on the transcript. A student who withdraws from an audit course by requesting that the instructor send a memo to the Registrar’s Office before the last day of class shall have that course deleted from the transcript. If a student does not withdraw and does not meet audit requirements as determined by the instructor for the course, a “no pass” grade is recorded on the transcript.

Application for Graduation

Thirty semester hours of a baccalaureate degree program, including at least six hours in the major field and the senior paper/project, must be taken at ORU. The minimum number of credits required for an undergraduate degree is 128 semester hours. Programs offered through the Online and Lifelong Learning department and the Anna Vaughn College of Nursing require a minimum of 120 semester hours. Students should refer to the department and college sections for information regarding the number of hours and the specific requirements for completing degrees.

An application for graduation must be filed with the Registrar’s Office during the fall semester prior to commencement. This process is completed online. Undergraduate and graduate students completing their degree requirements in the fall or spring and undergraduate students with six or fewer hours to complete in the summer are eligible to apply for graduation. All monies owed to the university must be paid in full two weeks prior to commencement for students to participate in commencement exercises.

The graduation application processing fee is nonrefundable for candidates who had planned to graduate in the spring but fail to submit requests to withdraw the application in writing by April 1. Candidates who are completing their course work in the fall must withdraw their application no later than December 1. If, for any reason, a candidate does not complete a degree program by the anticipated graduation date, the student must complete any deficiencies by August 31 of that year or they will forfeit their diploma fee and be required to submit an new application.

Undergraduate students can participate in hooding and commencement activities if they have completed all of the graduation requirements or if they (1) have the Registrar’s verification that they do not lack more than six hours from degree completion and (2) have enrolled in summer school at ORU to complete those courses. Students who require more than six hours, including transfer course work and CLEP exams, to complete in the summer must submit a Petition to Participate in Commencement. This process is completed online.

Withdrawal from the University

A student withdrawing from the university must initiate the process online. The date that the notice is received constitutes the official date of withdrawal, and all applicable financial and academic policies will apply. The last day to withdraw from the university is the date for the final day of class. The calendar at the beginning of this catalog lists such dates.

Probation and Suspension

Academic

Students are expected to make satisfactory progress toward a degree or other approved objective to be eligible to continue enrolling in the university.

A probation list, based on students’ academic achievements for the previous 12 months, is compiled once each academic year prior to the fall semester.

Students are placed on probation if they fail to complete at least 75% of the hours attempted for the previous two semesters. Credit is not awarded for grades of “F,” “I,” or “W.” Likewise, credit is not awarded for noncredit or audited courses. Students whose grade point averages fall below the minimums required for total quality hours are also placed on probation. These minimums appear in the following chart:

Total Quality Minimum

Hours Attempted GPA Required

1-26 1.50

27-59 1.75

More than 60 2.00

Students are removed from probation when they submit additional academic work sufficient to raise them to the minimum requirements. Academic progress is re-evaluated at the end of the following fall semester. Normally, students who are not removed from the probation list after one full year are suspended. Students on probation are generally not eligible for financial aid.

Students accepted into ORU on probationary status are subject to the same policies as students placed on probation. Graduate students should consult the graduate academic standing policies in the appropriate graduate sections.

Upon recommendation of the college dean and approval of the Provost, a student may be put on probation or may be suspended at any time for severely inadequate academic work. Such suspension may be temporary or permanent.

Financial Obligations

Every student is required to meet financial obligations to the university according to the Settlement of Accounts section found under Financial Information in this catalog. Failure to meet these requirements may result in suspension.

Honors

Honor Rolls

The Provost’s honor roll recognizes undergraduate students who carry at least 12 hours for credit in a semester, exclusive of pass/no-pass courses, and who attain a grade point average of 3.50 or higher with no grade below “C.” The President’s honor roll recognizes undergraduate students who carry at least 12 hours for credit in a semester, exclusive of pass/no-pass courses, and who attain a grade point average of 4.00. A student doesn’t appear on both lists, only on the higher one he or she qualifies for.

Graduating with Honors

Honors are determined for the commencement program and ceremony, for both graduate and undergraduate students, based on the cumulative GPA at the conclusion of the fall semester prior to commencement. Honors on the diploma include the final semester of coursework for the degree, the grade earned on the senior paper or project and the oral defense of the senior paper or project.

Undergraduate

Students who fulfill the degree requirements with cumulative grade point averages (GPAs) of at least 3.80 and earn grades of “A” or “B” on the senior paper/project receive the distinction summa cum laude. Students with cumulative GPAs between 3.60 and 3.79 who earn grades of “A” or “B” on the senior paper/project receive the distinction magna cum laude. Students with a cumulative GPA between 3.40 and 3.59 who earn a grade of “A” or “B” on the senior paper/project receive the distinction cum laude. To receive honors, students also must be successful in the oral defense of the senior paper/project.

Graduate

Graduate students completing a master’s program with 4.00 GPA’s receive the distinction “with high honors,” and those with GPA’s between 3.80 and 3.99 receive the distinction “with honors.” Doctoral programs do not have specific honors distinctions.

Transferring Credit

Credit can be transferred to ORU in several ways. Some involve earning credit before enrolling at ORU (matriculating) and some after.

Transferring Credit before Matriculation

ORU accepts liberal arts courses from regionally accredited institutions. Regionally accredited means that an institution is accredited by one of the six regionally stipulated accreditation agencies approved by the U.S. Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). ORU also accepts credits from schools accredited by the Association for Biblical Higher Education (ABHE), and the Association of Theological Schools (ATS). Technical or vocational courses are not ordinarily considered for transfer. No credit is given for any course with less than a “C” level grade. Transfer credits from institutions that are not regionally accredited may be accepted on the same basis they are accepted by the reporting institution in their own state.

Transfer credit is based on the transfer guidelines established by ORU (available on request). Courses that do not have an ORU equivalent but are academic in nature are counted as general elective credit unless transferred in to meet a specific requirement through a petition to transfer course.

ORU accepts test-out credit from regionally accredited institutions in accordance with the established ORU Transfer Guidelines. Grade of “A,” “B,” or “C” on a test-out are recorded as a “TPC” on the ORU transcript. Grades of “D” and “F” are recorded as an “NTD” on the ORU transcript. The words “test-out” appear as part of the course title on the ORU transcript.

A maximum of 72 semester hours may be transferred into ORU from a community or junior college. A maximum of 98 hours can be transferred from four-year institutions. The last 30 semester hours of a degree program, including at least six hours in the major field and the senior paper or project, must be taken at ORU.

Transcripts submitted to ORU become the property of ORU and are stored in students’ permanent files. They cannot be copied or reissued except for on-campus advisement purposes, in which case the documents are delivered directly to academic departments.

Transferring Credit from Oklahoma Colleges and Universities

Oral Roberts University participates in the Course Equivalency Project (CEP) sponsored by the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education. CEP is a postsecondary education resource service that provides course equivalency information to facilitate student transfer within the Oklahoma System of Higher Education. Its database contains faculty-generated course equivalency information for hundreds of courses offered at most institutions in Oklahoma. The courses are organized by discipline: biology, history, etc. Within each discipline, several equivalency groups appear, each containing a collection of courses from sponsoring institutions. Credit for a course within a group can be transferred to any system institution that sponsors a course in that group. The entire matrix of courses and their transferability can be found at http://www.okhighered.org/student-center/transfer-stdnts/course-transfer.shtml. Prerequisites for these courses must be met.

Transferring Credit through Articulation Agreements

Articulation agreements are agreements between two educational entities to ease the transfer process for students transferring from one educational institution to the other. Oral Roberts University has several articulation agreements to help provide a seamless transition for students transferring into ORU as well as ORU students transferring out to enroll in programs not offered at ORU (e.g., speech or physical therapy). More information is available in the department sections of this catalog that have specific articulation agreements.

Following are articulation agreements that apply to a broader range of students transferring to ORU from Tulsa Community College, Christ for the Nations Institute, Teen Mania, Victory Bible College and Rhema Bible Training College. Students transferring into ORU under these articulation agreements should note that once students transfer to ORU, taking addional coursework from their previous institutions cannot be transferred into ORU for credit.

Articulation Agreement with Tulsa Community College

An articulation agreement between Tulsa Community College (TCC) and ORU has been developed to assist students with an associate’s degree from TCC to obtain a bachelor’s degree at ORU. This agreement allows students from TCC to transfer to ORU and receive the maximum allowable credit towards a bachelor’s degree.

Admission Criteria

Students interested in transferring from TCC to ORU under this articulation agreement need to do the following:

• Apply for admission to Oral Roberts University.

• Meet ORU’s minimum academic and admissions transfer requirements.

• Complete all TCC courses before taking any ORU courses.

• Transfer between 60 and 72 hours.

• Understand that only courses with a grade of “C” or better can be transferred.

• Understand that no remedial or developmental courses can be transferred.

TCC and ORU also have an Honors Transfer Articulation Agreement designed to facilitate the transfer of students between the honors programs at TCC and ORU. Transfer students may be given full credit for their honors hours earned when the credit is appropriate to the student’s degree program and the receiving institution (ORU) has validated the courses, with the following additional provisions:

• TCC Honors Scholars with a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher qualify for the ORU Honors Program and may use up to 12 transfer honors credit hours toward the 21 honors hours required for graduating as a transfer scholar.

• TCC Honors Scholars must earn an A or B in any TCC honors class for it to be used to meet ORU Honors Program requirements.

• TCC students who meet the ORU Honors Program requirements (minimum 29 ACT or 1280 SAT and minimum overall GPA of 3.5 from TCC) may apply for the Honors Program Scholar’s Scholarship. The deadline is March 1.

• ORU Honors Program students transferring to TCC’s Honors Program may use 12 transfer honors hours from ORU toward TCC Honors Scholar graduation requirements (24 honors credit hours or 21 honors credit hours plus an approved honors service learning project).

• Both institutions intend to remain active members of the Great Plains Honors Council and the National Collegiate Honors Council.

Articulation Agreements with Bible Institutes and Academies

Oral Roberts University (ORU) and the following Bible institutes and academies share a similar mission of preparing students to reach their world with the Gospel of Jesus Christ and to demonstrate God’s healing power through the Holy Spirit:

• Christ for the Nations Institute

• Teen Mania

• Victory Bible College

• Rhema Bible Traing College

Thus, articulation agreements between ORU and these educational entities have been developed to assist students transferring to ORU in order to obtain a bachelor’s degree from ORU. These agreements help provide a seamless transition process that allows students from these educational entities to transfer to ORU and receive the maximum allowable credit towards a baccalaureate degree. Students may not enroll in these institutions once they have matriculated for the purpose of transferring coursework to fulfill degree requirements

National Institute of Christian Leadership

The ORU Undergraduate Department of Theology and Ministry and the National Institute of Christian Leadership (NICL) have entered into the following agreement:

• Students who successfully complete two seminars within the NICL, and are properly accepted into Oral Roberts University, based on normal entrance requirements, may earn three transfer credit hours towards a BA degree in the ORU College of Theology and Ministry.

• A maximum of six credit hours may be earned through completion of all four seminars. The transfer credit hours consist of the following: students who successfully complete the seminars entitled “Leadership Management” and “Staff and Volunteers” are given credit for CHRM 460 Church Administration; and students who successfully complete the seminars entitled “Preaching and Worship” and “Strategic Leadership for Growth” are given credit for CHRM 302 Christian Leadership.

• Students pursuing a degree are required to meet all degree program requirements as stated in the ORU catalog.

Credit from Concurrent Enrollment

High School and College. College credit hours earned while concurrently enrolled in high school are eligible for transfer credit in accordance with ORU transfer guidelines if the hours were earned at a regionally accredited institution or otherwise recognized institution. College credits earned prior to high school graduation that are eligible for transfer credit as ORU 100- and 200-level courses are automatically transferred in. College credits earned prior to high school graduation that would transfer in as ORU 300- and 400-level courses, including general elective credit, are eligible for transfer credit by Petition for Policy Exception only.

Credit from Professional Programs

Transfer of courses to any program that prepares students for professional certification or licensure may not apply to degree requirements if such transfer courses are prohibited or restricted by state law, the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, or specific requirements for professions, certification, accreditation, or licensure. For example, in the teacher education programs, ORU cannot normally accept credit from junior colleges or community colleges to meet upper-division teacher education requirements.

Credit from Non-Accredited (Regional) Institutions

Certification, diploma, associate degree, and other pre-bachelor degree programs issued by institutions not accredited by regional accrediting agencies and without articulation agreements are not accepted for block credit. Courses in these programs may be evaluated individually according to ORU credit transfer policies.

Credits earned in military service schools or through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute are reviewed by the Registrar’s Office. Credit may be granted if approved by petition. Basic Military Training meets the ORU general education requirements for Health Fitness I and II.

Credit from Examinations

Credit granted through Advanced Placement (AP), the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), and Advanced Level (A Level) examinations set by the General Certificate Examination (GCE) Boards appear on student transcripts as accepted credit regardless of whether the students graduate from ORU. More information is available in the section titled “Advanced Placement and College Level Examination Program” in this catalog.

Credit from Foreign Institutions

ORU generally follows the guidelines set forth by the National Association of Foreign Student Affairs (NAFSA) and the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) when transferring foreign academic credit. The amount of credit granted may vary at the discretion of the degree-granting dean. An official final transcript from the foreign school with an original transcript, an English translation, and course descriptions must be submitted for evaluation in order to transfer credit.

Transferring Credit after Matriculation

To transfer courses after matriculation, ORU students should consult the transfer guidelines established by ORU (available online and by request). Courses that do not have an ORU equivalent but are academic in nature are counted as general elective credit unless transferred in to meet a specific requirement through a Petition to Transfer Course. This approval must be obtained prior to enrollment in those courses.

A maximum of 72 semester hours may be transferred into ORU from a community college or junior college. A maximum of 98 hours can be transferred from four-year institutions. The last 30 semester hours of a degree program, including at least six hours in the major field and the senior paper/project, must be taken at ORU.

Academic Policy Changes

The university reserves the right to change academic policies when deemed necessary and to hold students responsible for any revisions. In the case of any change in courses already completed, students are not obligated to fulfill the new requirements. All changes are announced and officially posted. It is ultimately the student’s responsibility to stay informed regarding changes that may affect programs and requirements for graduation.

Policy Exception

Students may petition to have a stated policy modified due to extenuating circumstances. Petitions for Policy Exception are available in the Registrar’s Office and, upon receipt of proper signatures, should be returned to the Registrar’s Office for processing. Students are notified by mail when final decisions are taken.